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Mountain Lion grade

1/1: What grade would you give to Mountain Lion?

A 510 (36.69%)
B 533 (38.35%)
C 187 (13.45%)
D 62 (4.46%)
E 26 (1.87%)
F 72 (5.18%)
Other polls | 1,390 votes | 15 comments

Mountain Lion grade | 15 comments | Create New Account
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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: cra on Aug 01, '12 07:51:32AM

I'd really like to know people's reasons for the lower grades, as that could be helpful in deciding whether to upgrade or not. Anyone?



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: DCJ001 on Aug 01, '12 10:38:20AM

The people who gave the lower grades are Microsoft employees.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Aug 01, '12 09:13:40PM

Ha!

---
iMac 2.93 GHz Core 2 Duo, 8GB, 1TB, Mac OS X 10.8
www.david-schwab.com
www.myspace/davidschwab
www.sgd-lutherie.com



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: fyngyrz on Aug 01, '12 01:55:50PM

Low grade because:

Sandbox by default, applescript busted, app store apps now emasculated by decree... that's serious enough, but you have to ask yourself if these things will be turned into roadblocks we can't work around.

"Full-screen" mode; Used to work with multiple monitors, now utterly broken.

Webserver? "Buy OS X Server"... seriously? Yep.

~/Library - Hidden

So. I didn't buy a mac to own an appliance. I bought it to own a computer. You know. Programmable, etc. The synergies of apps that work together.

Apple has been far from perfect; lack of decent IPC (public port style messaging), the unbelievably weak Finder, the manifest dumbness of that menu bar in a multi-monitor environment, the single button mouse idiocy, PPC emulation gone, the anti-typist chiclet keyboards (thank you, Matias!) that whole broken display profile processing thing, broken UDP ports... a trail of unfixed bugs that stretches back across a number of OS releases.... but it was improving in the newer versions, even if they were screwing people who bought earlier versions thinking they'd be responsible enough to fix the bugs in them.

But now it's actually devolving. The "upgrade" is a downgrade. Compounding this is Apple's failure to bring IOS along; 20 apps per folder, no nesting... come on. This isn't 1981 any longer. I want to put apps of one type into ONE folder. Instead, I have folder1, folder2, folder3... ugh. A good number of the apps I have that used to work fine just crash now, or won't even start. Not that IOS is that important to me by itself -- I don't dev for it -- but I take it as a sign that the people making decisions at Apple are doing a very bad job of it.

Time for me to take a harder look at where I want to put my effort.

Right now, I have ML running on a machine to test my apps. I have no plans to actually use it myself, or, if it turns out that an app won't run on it, to modify my products to comply with the sandbox or anything else they've hosed. I will, however, warn my users -- that's only fair.

---
--fyngyrz



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: cra on Aug 02, '12 12:08:13AM

Thanks for the extensive reply :)

I find it somewhat strange that " the single button mouse idiocy" still pops up as an argument, though? I have been using my Microsoft (!) mouse since day 1 as a Mac user, and all my buttons work just like I'm used to. Granted, I had to set them up in the settings, but that wasn't a problem.

I have seen some devolving myself after my first experience with OS X. When I first started using it (I think it was Leopard), I was impressed how it automatically knew which printer to use by default based on my IP address (?). When I as at home, it selected my home printer. At work locations it always selected the one I used last on that location. In Snow Leopard that was gone.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: agentx on Aug 01, '12 07:55:53AM

As such when you compare ML to Lion it really blows it out of the water!

I would have given Lion an E/F grade on release and voted a B on ML v10.8.
I am planning to get a majority of my clients onto an "even" release schedule as these seem to be the best incarnations. ie. 10.4,10.6, 10.8 have all been the better of the Apple's OS releases. At my client sites we are looking now to a 2 year OS upgrade cycle.....no way we are going yearly.

Luckily most of my user base (~80%) are on 10.6.8 about 15% Lion and 5% other.
I am slowly starting to forget all my 10.5 hacks and only coming across a handful in my travels/deployments.




Edited on Aug 01, '12 07:56:07AM by agentx



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Robert McMahan on Aug 01, '12 09:23:11AM

RSS was removed. Using an RSS reader slows me down--it is slower and takes more steps on certain web pages, like when I want to save a page to Evernote for reading later.

My late 2009, Core i5, 27" iMac seems slower--I seem to get a lot more spinning beach balls.

It also use more RAM--when I open the usual apps, I have less free RAM available and have to use Memory Cleaner sooner and more often. The only positive here is that with no RSS in Safari, I don't have so many windows/tabs open at one time, so it does not grab so much RAM.

Apparently Spotlight searching of network volumes hasn't been fixed.

I like Messages, notifications, more iCloud syncing, dictation, improved Address Book (Contacts).

Overall, its a solid update, numerous improvements, but, for me, the feature removals and decreased performance drops the grade from an "A" to a "B+".



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: lowbatteries on Aug 01, '12 01:29:51PM

Free RAM is wasted RAM. Ideally, free RAM should be as low as possible, to make everything you use snappier.

See http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1342?viewlocale=en_US - "inactive" ram is available to apps just like "free" ram is, but has the added benefit that it might hold data you'll use again shortly. So freeing it up has no benefit.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Robert McMahan on Aug 02, '12 10:26:16AM

"Free RAM is wasted RAM. Ideally, free RAM should be as low as possible, to make everything you use snappier."

That may be true in some cases but certainly not all. If i'm sitting here with 14 MB of free RAM and a spinning beach ball while the system is paging large chunks of data in/out, it is definitely not snappier.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Aug 01, '12 09:23:31PM

I'm on an early 2009 Core2Duo iMac. Mountain Lion is much faster than Lion was.

Regarding RSS, I was initially very disappointed with that being removed. But that lead me to search for a new RSS reader. Now I'm using Vienna. And you know what? It's way better than doing it in Safari. It's not slower and doesn't take more steps. It actually takes less steps.

I can see all my RSS feeds in one window. I can see which of those has updates. If I click on a feed, I can see a list of all the articles. Clicking on an article shows the story. Vienna, as well as NetNewsWire will even display the web page with no need to switch to Safari. I have it set up so clicking on the story header opens it in Safari.

When I was using Safari as an RSS reader, I would have to look at the feeds in my bookmarks bar. Some of them were not visible without me clicking on the bookmarks menu. That took more work.

Safari was my introduction to RSS, but using a separate reader is a better experience IMO.

---
iMac 2.93 GHz Core 2 Duo, 8GB, 1TB, Mac OS X 10.8
www.david-schwab.com
www.myspace/davidschwab
www.sgd-lutherie.com



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Robert McMahan on Aug 02, '12 10:24:51AM

"I'm on an early 2009 Core2Duo iMac. Mountain Lion is much faster than Lion was."

I'm happy for you. I wish mine was.

_________________________
"Regarding RSS, I was initially very disappointed with that being removed. But that lead me to search for a new RSS reader. Now I'm using Vienna. And you know what? It's way better than doing it in Safari. It's not slower and doesn't take more steps. It actually takes less steps. "

Everybody's work flow is different. In Safari, I would go through all my RSS feeds and just command-click on a link to save the article to a new tab behind the current tab. Then I come back and read it later. In RSS reader, when I create a new tab for an article, it takes me to that tab and then I have top click back to the feed list--extra click. Plus, my RSS reader is much slower opening a page than Safari is.

Then, if I want to save to Evernote for future reference, I then have to open the article back in Safari to do that--extra click. Then, If I want to click a link to iTunes App Store or Mac App Store, again, it takes me to Safari and then to the appropriate app store--switch app, switch app again. Really not efficient for my preferred work flow. I'm glad it works for you, but just because it works for you doesn't mean it works for everyone.

The question asked was to give reasons for the grade I gave. These grades and reasons for them are completely subjective and different for each person.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Makosuke on Aug 01, '12 04:07:19PM

Thus far Mountain Lion seems stable, clean, has some noticeable speed boosts over Lion (even my wife commented on the improvement in Fast User Switching speed), and seems to have fixed a couple of things that the Lion Finder broke with handling links to network volumes.

It also FINALLY removes the boneheaded cross-browser delete-key shortcut for the back button from Safari, which has been a longstanding booby-trap that any UI designer could tell you was insanity from the start (it does something completely different depending on whether the focus is in a text box on a web page or anywhere else on the page, so an accidental tab followed by a delete can--and often does for me--result in you going back a page and losing the contents of a form, rather than just deleting a character from the next field).

On the down side, after forking out for Mountain Lion Server, I've discovered the harsh truth that the Time Machine server only allows you to serve a single partition, and doesn't allow for any kind of per-machine quota, which makes it nearly unusable for any situation in which you have more than one machine backing up unless you have vast amounts of backup space available. Something that, ironically, was never a problem with the non-server Lion (or 10.6, or 10.5), where you could share multiple partitions and just select one per machine to back up to, thereby instituting a crude sort of quota control.

There are apparently a couple of hacks to get around this, but since 10.6 Server had the functionality in place, it's sort of unforgivable that they broke it, especially since it's an obvious use case in either a household with several Macs or a medium sized office. I was planning on instituting TM backups across all machines at the office here, but it means we'll either be stuck on 10.6 Server or I'll have to hack quotas onto 10.8.

Really, guys, it's not an unreasonable feature to ask for.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Robert McMahan on Aug 02, '12 09:22:34AM

"Free RAM is wasted RAM. Ideally, free RAM should be as low as possible, to make everything you use snappier."

That may be true in some cases but certainly not all. If i'm sitting here with 14 MB of free RAM and a spinning beach ball while the system is paging large chunks of data in/out, it is definitely not snappier.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: spinkb on Aug 02, '12 01:01:29PM

ML for the most part is fine, but ti has bugs. Some surprising.

USB DisplayLink driver is unsupported now...why? 10.7 to 10.8 was fairly minor. They released a new driver...back to mostly functional.

Drag and drop an attachment out of Mail, it drops on the desktop 1920 pixels to the right of my drop. Really annoying. guess they forgot to offset the left monitor in their drop pixel calculation...

cmd-delete to delete an item in the Finder now auto selects another item for you after your first item goes to the trash...and key repeat keeps it going randomly deleting many files when you had only intended one. Watch out!

Eclipse suddenly now no longer scrolls my line numbers. Worked perfect in 10.7, 10.6, 10.5...but 10.8...its broken. Can't spend the time updating all my stuff to a newer slower version of Eclipse.

And Safari has done many crazy things on me...a browser restart fixes them, but frustrating all the same. Hard to explain them, but mouse clicks don't go where expected, offset vertically int he wrong place sometimes, and other weird rendering, and freezing loading issues.

Mail sometimes just can't handle a message. Happens on reply. Fix is to close message, delete draft, and try again.

Mail halts displaying incoming messages while an outgoing message is being sent... For me, that can be problematic when SMTP server is running slow for some reason and I hear my iPhone dinging that I just received 3 other new messages and i can't get to them.

Most things are fine...but 10.7.4 was more refined.

--Ben



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: cagg on Aug 04, '12 08:47:53AM

I gave it a B. There are some issues with ML:
- there are remaining bugs, like Click to Tweet in notification center breaks if I Cancel. Textedit freezes if I duplicate an iCloud document then rename to the same name
- loss of easy web sharing like someone mentioned. Webserver is still there but you need to activate it from command line. Lucky I'm technically inclined :-)
- loss of RSS feeds in Safari (I admit I like the app Reeder but it's more convenient to have it in the same app)
- loss of default font choices in Safari. I can't fathom why Apple did this???? It's still accessible from command line but that's not convenient
The improvements in ML seem minor, but it definitely seems 'zippier'. The improvements were. however, enough to keep me from giving it a C.



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