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Using Mail.app with sendmail in 10.1.1 UNIX
OK, so I was getting a UNIX account in Mail.app to pick up the mail in /var/mail/geoff when it was first set up, then it would fail to pick any more up after that.

If you have had a similar problem, read the rest of the article for the solution...
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Great UNIX reference source UNIX
I have been looking for a good, easy to navigate, yet extensive UNIX reference. I finally found one here: http://wks.uts.ohio-state.edu/

I must say that I did not find this myself - it was recommended on a MacNN forum that I started discussing creating shell scripts.

[Editor's note: I've also added the link to the Links collection here for easy future access.]
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Use SSH with ProjectBuilder's SCM feature UNIX
This document describes how to set up CVS using SSH on a client computer and using Project Builder's SCM feature for version management. It assumes that CVS and SSH are already set up on the server that you will be checking your code out from. It is desirable to use SSH because CVS transmits usernames and passwords in clear text otherwise.

If you'd like the how-to, read the rest of the article...
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Stop typo correction suggestions UNIX
Let's say you're typing a command, and you do a typo. The shell will offer you a correction ... for example, you type:
pinge
and it'll ask you:
OK? ping?
If you don't like that, these commands will stop it from suggesting typo corrections:
unset autocorrect
unset correct
You can put those in whatever appropriate .tcshrc file or such-like place you keep such things. BTW, use at your own caution ... I'm a total Unix newbie who swiped this off a Google search result, and I take NO responsibility for absolutely anything in the whole wide world. ;-)

[Editor's note: If you'd like to re-enable the typo corrections, simply use set autocorrect and set correct. You'll need to close and re-open a Terminal window for the changes to take effect. And I think these commands are generally safe to use :-)]
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Easy application launch Terminal script UNIX
Here is a shell script that will open applications from the terminal without having to type out the full path to the application. It assumes that your applications are kept in /Applications. Using this script and an alias, you can type something like "o TextEdit" to open TextEdit, or "o TextEdit ~/Documents/some_file" to open some_file in TextEdit.

If you'd like to see the script, read the rest of the article.
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Installing a CVS pserver UNIX
Hey! You just crave to install a CVS server on a MacOS X computer so several people can work on the same project or to have a single repository for your sources on your network? Don't worry, this is very simple, as long as you have installed the Developer Tools.

If you'd like to do get a CVS server running, read the rest of this article.

[Editor's note: I have not tried this myself, and there may very well be a typo or two I made in posting this article ... if something doesn't work, please let me know what needs to be fixed!]
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Print to NeXT and other UNIX printers in 10.1 UNIX
[Editor's note: This one is way beyond my ability to test, as the only UNIX box in my house is OS X! Nonetheless, if it helps someone out there, that's why we're here. Use at your own risk, of course!]

OS X 10.1 now uses the 'o' command option in control files of a print job. The version of lpd in NeXTSTEP and other UNIX systems probably doesn't understand this 'new' option. I found a simple solution for that problem. You can batch the LPRIOMHelper. The file is located here:

/System/Library/Printers/IOMs/LPRIOM.plugin/Contents/MacOS/LPRIOMHelper

Use a hex editor to replace 0x6F with 0x6C ('o' -> 'l') at position 0x1A03 (6659 Dez). You need root permissions to do that. And check for the right file attributes after editing the file:
-rwsr-xr-x  1 root  wheel  18984 Oct 21 20:31 LPRIOMHelper
The UNIX commands to set the owner and file attributes for LPRIOMHelper are:
chown root.wheel LPRIOMHelper
chmod a+x LPRIOMHelper
chmod u+s LPRIOMHelper
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A brief tutorial on symbolic links UNIX
OS X's file structure mounts all partitions under the "/Volumes" directory at the root level of the filesystem. However, when navigating the filesystem with "cd" and other commands, it can be annoying to type "/Volumes/volume_name" each time you want to access a different partition. To learn about symbolic links and use them to add shortcuts at the root level of your filesystem, read the rest of this article. This assumes you are moderately comfortable in the Terminal, and that you have administrative privileges.
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Replace the FTP server with ProFTPd UNIX
Here is a step by step guide to installing the industrial-strength FTP server ProFTPd on Mac OS X. It assumes that you have the Developers Tools installed on your system and that you have an Internet connection. The installation will replace the existing OS X FTP server with ProFTPd.

If you'd like to get ProFTPd running on your OS X installation, read the rest of this article.
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Archiving from the command line UNIX
Stuffit Deluxe is a great tool for most archiving duties, but not too good if you have a large number of individual file archives to create. I had this problem with uploading quiz results to individual students. To save space, I needed to ZIP each of 23 files and to do that with a GUI is pretty clumsy. However, I discovered that two CLI tools, zip and unzip, can make this job much easier.

unzip works just like you'd expect:
  unzip [zipfilename]
zip, on the other hand, took a little figuring out:
   zip -h                              {...dumps online help listing}
zip [zipfilename] [file to zip] {...zips and retains the original file}
zip -m [zipfilename] [file to zip] {...zips and removes the original file}
Best of all, I created a script called smush to help me out even more.
# smush - a quick and dirty script to zip pdfs

for i in *.pdf
do
echo "zipping ${i}"
zip -m $i.zip $i
done
I cd to the directory, type smush and it all works automagically. Sweet!

[Editor's note: You'll need to enter the above lines into a terminal editor such as pico, save the file, make it executable (chmod 755 filename), and then make sure it's on your path to use the script.]
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