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Faster Finder scrolling with scroll wheel mice Desktop
If you have a scroll wheel mouse and want to scroll faster in the Finder with it, hold the option key as you scroll. This will cause you to scroll by half a page per 'tick' of your wheel. This works with my Microsoft Intellimouse Explorer and I'm assuming it will work with all scroll wheel mice.

[Editor's note: Works fine with the Gateway Trekker Wheel Mouse on my G4/350 ... don't ask!]
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Comments as a replacement for labels Desktop
ive seen a ton of people gripe about the lack of labels in os x, so i hope this helps those that really need them.

1. set your windows to list view
2. pop up the view options panel (apple-j)
3. click the show comments checkbox
4. notice that the comments column appears in the list view
5. label files--type comments in the comments field

you can also write a few applescript droplets to automate entering comments. i have three droplets that set comments: "new", "current", "completed".

paul

[Editor's note: There's a good discussion on this very subject over on the MacFixIt Forums, including a couple of posted AppleScripts to make it easy to 'batch comment' files.]
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'Open Terminal' toolbar AppleScript Desktop
"Open Terminal" is an AppleScript that makes use of the new Toolbar Script system that was introduced with Mac OS X 10.1. It will open up a new terminal window in the current folder. It's also possible to drop files and folders onto the script button. This will open a new terminal session for every item that was dropped.

More information and the download can be found on this page.

[Editor's note: This is a very handy little script - it works as advertised. Make sure you check out Marc's homepage while you're in the neighborhood, too -- he's got some other cool stuff there!]
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Batch resize images from the Finder Desktop
Wanting to quickly resize bunches of digital camera images, I found the available shareware apps a bit overkill and spendy for the task, and wondered if there was anything similar to BeOS' Tracker add-ons that would let me do the job directly from the file management interface. As mentioned in a previous hint, you can download Toolbar Scripts for OSX that integrate directly into the Finder. Lo and behold, Apple offers a free "Scale by %" script that does exactly what I needed.

Place the script in ~/Library/Scripts. In Finder, use View -> Customize Toolbar. Drag the "Scale by %" script from ~/Library/Scripts onto the toolbar. Navigate to a folder full of images you want resized, click the Scale By toolbar icon, and enter the scale factor into the dialog. Bingo - hundreds of images resized with two clicks, without opening a separate app.

Warning: The script will overwrite the original images, rather than writing out new filenames. If you want to save the original images, be sure to make a copy of the folder before beginning. It should be possible to modify the script to fix this.
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Play DVDs on your desktop Desktop
A co-worker of mine found the following information somewhere on the web...

If you make a PNG image (editor: TIFF also works) with the RGB values 0,16,0 and set it as your desktop picture (the hint he saw recommended using a 1 pixel by 1 pixel PNG) then your DVD player can play on your desktop. Start a DVD and then hide the player!

This also works with the Terminal app. You can set your Terminal background to RGB values of 0,16,0 (with no transparency, unfortunately) and whatever the DVD player is showing will play through the background.

[Editor's note: This little trick will NOT work on NVidia cards; much as ATI's can't take screenshots, NVidia's can't play DVDs with the colored window trick.]
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Organize your Favorites into subfolders Desktop
I keep my 'Favorites' folder in the dock. Recently it has become so overcrowded that the "click and hold down the button" listing went off the top of the screen.

I've written a Perl script that sorts the 'Favorites' folder (~/Library/Favorites) into A-Z subfolders, thus keeping things more compact. Make sure you save the file with its unix line endings.

[Editor's note: Although I haven't installed this yet myself, the script is very straightforward -- great idea, Rob! Make sure you make the script file executable (chmod 755 script_name) in order to use it.]
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Add 'Hide App' dock menu to Cocoa apps Desktop
If you are like me your Desktop is often cluttered with way too many windows. I use the Hide command or its option-click counterpart quite a bit to free up screen space and clutter. Command-option-clicking in the Dock is also handy for hiding all. For one app, however, that's not always best either.

With a few simple Interface Builder connections you can add a Hide App dock menu item to almost any Cocoa application. Sadly I couldn't get this to work with a few Apple apps I use often. The Terminal is one, Mail is another.

If you have the Developer Tools installed and would like to add a "Hide Application" dock menu to your favorite Cocoa applicaiton, read the rest of the article.

[Editor's note: I followed these instructions and they worked perfectly for the app I tested (Okito Composer). Even if you're not interested in a new "Hide" dock menu, this is a great tutorial that shows how easy it is to modify an applications behavior with InterfaceBuilder.]
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Tile background images in Finder windows Desktop
If you want to tile the background image of all windows that look like "General", you can edit the following file with PropertyList Editor (or pico or vi or BBEdit etc):
~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.finder.plist
Search for 'icnv' and you should find a section that looks like this:
<key>icnv</key>
<dict>
... lines not shown ...
<key>BackgroundFlags</key>
<integer>0</integer>
... lines not shown ...
</dict>
Change the "0" below "BackgroundFlags" to a "1" (and save the change!) and then either logout and login or relaunch the Finder. When you do so, the image you place in the Global View Options will be tiled in the background of the Finder windows.

Sebastien

[Editor's note: This is distinct from the previous tip that discussed tiling desktop images, although closely related! In order to see the keys discussed, first go to the Finder, open a new Finder window, set it to view by icon, and specify a background image. You should now have the BackgroundFlags key in the com.apple.finder.plist file.]
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Tile a background image Desktop
You can edit the com.apple.desktop.plist file so your background image will be tiled if it is not already.

Just go into the com.apple.desktop.plist (in your user's Library/Preferences directory) file with pico or your favorite text editor and remove the key for placement as well as the string for it. Take out these lines:
<key>Placement</key>
<string>Crop</string>
Then save the file, log out and log back in. Your background should now be tiled.

NOTE: Your background must have been set before you logged in. If you set a new background, you will have to log out and log back in before this will work. I don't know why. Also, I am working on finding a good way to do this with the defaults command.

[Editor's note: I have not tried this myself yet, but if you try it and it doesn't work, you should be able to delete the plist file and the system will create a new one for you.]
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View window contents without scrolling Desktop
If you are in the icon or list view, then you can move around the whole content by pressing command-option and then click-hold with your mouse. You canĀ“t see the effect if all the files are visible.

/Joakim Andersson
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