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iTunes 11: Two ways to quickly add songs to Up Next Apps
Up Next, the feature in iTunes 11 that (sort of) replaces iTunes DJ, where you could queue up songs for a listening party, or just for your work day, offers many ways to add music. But if you want to add songs quickly to Up Next, here are two ways you can do so.

First, just drag an item from the iTunes library onto the iTunes LCD, the display at the top of the window that shows what's playing. This can be a single song, an album, or a playlist. The iTunes LCD will show a blue border when you bring the item over it, and the Up Next icon will flash with art of the item you have added.

The second way is to press the Option key and hover your cursor over an item. The track number next to its name will change to a + icon. Click that icon to add it to Up Next. (Thanks to David Chartier for this one.)
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Make home Library sub-folders available to Spotlight System
Here's one approach to making items in your home Library folder searchable in Spotlight.

Spotlight searches exclude items that exist in the user's home Library folder (now hidden by default). There are some items that normally reside in the home Library folder that I want to be available for my Spotlight searches. Rather than trying to find a hack to defeat the system's exclusion of the home Library folder for Spotlight, I use a method that doesn't require crossing the boundaries of what the OS permits users to do.

I simply select folders, the contents of which I would like to appear in Spotlight searches, such as Scripts and Favorites, move them up a level to the home folder, then create a symbolic link to the moved item to serve as a substitute for it in its original location. I'm including source for an AppleScript droplet that I use to automate this process. If your Library folder is already open (one way to open it is to hold down the Option key then select it from the Go menu in the Finder), just drop one or more of its folders onto the droplet. If you double-click the droplet created from the AppleScript, it will open your Library folder so that you can drop one or more folders into the ensuing dialog box.
on open the_items
        my up_one_leave_link(the_items)
end open

on up_one_leave_link(the_items)
        display dialog "This will move dropped folders
up one directory and substitute symbolic links
that point to their new location.

Is that what you want to do?"
        repeat with the_item in the_items
                set the_item to the_item as alias
                tell application "Finder"
                        set sost to ((container of folder ¬
                                (the_item as string)) as alias) as string
                        set sost_Parent to (container of folder ¬
                                (sost as alias))
                end tell
                set sost to POSIX path of sost
                set sost_Parent to POSIX path of (sost_Parent as string)
                set this_filepath to (the_item as string)
                if last character of this_filepath is ":" then
                        tell me to set it_is_a_folder to true
                else
                        set it_is_a_folder to false
                end if
                set thesourcename to (name of (info for the_item))
                set the_source_file to POSIX path of this_filepath
                set pos_filepath to sost
                if it_is_a_folder then
                        try
                                set my_command to "mv" & ¬
                                        space & (quoted form of the_source_file) ¬
                                        & space & (quoted form of sost_Parent)
                                set my_command to my_command & ¬
                                        ";ln -s" & space & (quoted form of sost_Parent) ¬
                                        & (quoted form of thesourcename) & space & (quoted form of sost)
                                do shell script my_command
                        on error onerr
                                activate
                                display dialog onerr
                        end try
                else
                        display dialog "Folders only, please!"
                end if
        end repeat
end up_one_leave_link

on run
        display dialog "This will move selected folders
up one directory and substitute symbolic links
that point to their new location.

Is that what you want to do?"
        do shell script "open ~/Library"
        do shell script "sleep 1"
        activate
        set the_items to ((choose folder) as list)
        up_one_leave_link(the_items)
end run
[kirkmc adds: Paste the above script in AppleScript Editor, then save it as an application. This solution should work, but be careful if, after an OS X update, something is broken.]
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See how long a given process has been running UNIX
I wanted to find out how long a certain background process had been running. There's a column for CPU Time in Activity Monitor, but that's not real clock time.

It turns out you can get this information with ps, via the etime keyword. So to get a list of every running process, in decreasing order of run time, just use this command:
ps -ax -o etime,command -c
To see the results for a single process, just add a grep at the end for the process' name. For example:
$ ps -ax -o etime,command -c | grep AppleVNCServer
03-08:09:16 AppleVNCServer
So on my Mac, the AppleVNCServer has been running for three days, eight hours, nine minutes, and 16 seconds. I have a need to do this pretty regularly, so I turned it into a simple command line app:
#!/bin/bash

# Display the time a given process has been running
# Use the process name when calling the command

ps -ax -o etime,command -c | grep $1
I saved that to a file named psup, and made it executable with chmod 755 psup. Now I can just type psup SomeProcess to see the uptime for SomeProcess.
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Quickly enter a time when creating Calendar events Apps
In month view in Calendar, if you double-click, you can enter a name for an event. By default, however, Calendar makes this an all-day event. You have to double-click the new event, then set the time. If you end the name of the event with a time, such as "6 pm," it then enters that as the start time. For example, double-clicking on November 30th, then quickly typing "Dinner with Paul 6pm" enters the event at 6pm on the 30th.

[kirkmc adds: Yes, this is good. I wish this worked in BusyCal, the calendar program I use.]
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Another way to fast-forward and rewind in QuickTime Player System 10.7
There are several ways to fast-forward and rewind in QuickTime Player so here is another one, that works on 10.7 or later. Clicking and holding the Play/Pause button for several seconds replaces the control with a slider. Drag the slider to the right to fast-forward and to the left to rewind. The speed, which is displayed in the upper left corner of the video, is controlled by how far the slider is dragged. Once the mouse button is released, fast-forwarding or rewinding stops.

[kirkmc adds: And if you have a trackpad, this method is even easier.]
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Create a QR code with your contact info Apps
1. Go to: qrstuff.com
2. Select "Contact Details"
3. Select vCard & fill in your info
4. Click DOWNLOAD

This QR code will add your contact info to people's address books if they scan it. You can create QR codes that can do lots of things. For example, you can create codes that will direct people to follow you on Twitter, like a page on Facebook, or compose an email to you.

[kirkmc adds: Another hint from robleach. I haven't tested this.]
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Happy Thanksgiving Site News
Happy Thanksgiving to all; no hints today. Enjoy your day of family, turkey and football, and be thankful for all you have.
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Create a QR code bookmarklet Apps
Have you ever been reading a web page and find you have to leave, but would like to continue reading on your phone? Here's a handy bookmarklet you can use to transfer the URL to your phone:
javascript:var%20qr=window.open('',%20'Scan%20Me',%20'toolbar=0,scrollbars=0,location=0,statusbar=0,menubar=0,resizable=0,width=110,height=130');qr.document.write('%3Cimg%20src=\'http://chart.apis.google.com/chart?chs=100x100&cht=qr&chld=M|0&chl='+document.location+%20'\'%20/%3E%3Cbr%20/%3E%3Ca%20href=\'javascript:self.close();\'%3EClose%20Me%3C/a%3E');

Copy this to a new bookmark. I named mine "Send to Phone." It pops up a little window with the URL of your current web page encoded as a QR code. Simply scan it directly off your computer screen with your phone's QR code reader and off you go! (I don't claim credit for this bookmarklet; I found it at http://www.masukomi.org/projects/qr_bookmarklet/.)

[kirkmc adds: Submitted by robleach; one of three hints submitted together. The others will follow.]
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Easily resend iMessage as text message Apps
Sometimes, such as early this week, Apple's iMessages servers go down. If so, and you try to send iMessages, you may want to resend those messages as standard text messages or SMSs. OS X Daily had a nice hint about how to do so easily. After you've sent the iMessage, if you see that it's not delivered, or if you simply want to use a belt-and-suspenders approach to make sure your recipient gets your message, just tap and hold on the blue bubble containing the message text, then choose Send as Text Message. It will get sent as a text message, and you can tell this by the green text bubble.

For this to work, you have to have your contact's phone number in their card. However, if you only have an email address for that contact, tapping and holding the text bubble shows Send to Email Address. In my tests, this failed every time, so I'm not exactly sure how this is supposed to work. (I assume that it would try and send the message as an email…) If anyone can get this to work, please post in the comments.
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Quick Reminder entry with alert System 10.8
If you ever want to create a reminder with an alert time, it's easy to do, and it's similar to Calendar's Quick Entry feature.

Just type something like "Dinner with grandpa at 6pm", and you will get a reminder with an alert at 6pm today. You can even specify a date, or use relative dates like today, tomorrow, etc.

[kirkmc adds: This makes sense, and it's good to remind people of it.]
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