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Create very unique signatures in Preview Apps
You can make signatures in Preview that are pen and ink style drawings.

I don't know if this has been posted yet, or if it is generally known, but I stumbled upon a neat feature of signatures in Preview.app. When you create a signature, if you you don't hold up a piece of paper with a signature on it, and simply smile for a mug shot, Preview will create a signature that is a neat pen and ink style image of yourself, or whatever is in front of the camera. I've created several, that for the right client, can be used as a humorous alternative to an actual signature. I also used a screen capture of the signature on a document and made the image into a Facebook Profile picture.

[crarko adds: Well I didn't know about it. Most folks use Photo Booth to do things like this, I'd guess, but I always appreciate a creative use of a program.]
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Custom margins in TextEdit Apps
There is already an old hint about this topic, but it doesn't really explain it very clearly, only in the comments.

Here's how you can change the margins in TextEdit to your favourite size, so that you can use, for example, the whole space on a sheet of paper when printing.

First, save your document first as a Rich Text file (.rtf), if you have not already done this. To see the effect directly in your document, open it and enable under the Format menu the setting Wrap to Page for your document.

Next open up the TextEdit preferences, switch to the tab Open and Save and check on the option Display RTF files as RTF code instead of formatted text.

Open the document again and you will see the raw code that defines how the document look like. You want to look in the 4th row, where it says:

margl1440margr1440

This defines the left and right margins, thats what the 'l' and 'r' behind marg stand for: left and right.

Now to define customized top and bottom margins you have to add margt and margb, and similarly to before 't'=top, and 'b'=bottom. So add these after the given ones for the side margins, like this:

margl*margr*margb*margt*

Now you can set the margins how you like. You have to replace the stars with the correct number in Twips (1 Twip = 1/1440 inch). Here a few examples:
  • 360 (.25 inch)
  • 720 (.5 inch)
  • 1080 (.75 inch)
  • 1440 (1 inch)
  • 567 (1 cm)
Finally save the modified document and change the preference settings back to what they were originally. Then open the document again and you'll have your custom margins.

[crarko adds: I haven't tested this one. Please note that updating older hints and clarifying them is always a good thing, so don't be shy about submitting ideas that do just that.]
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Low-power mode for Maps.app iOS devices
It's possible to save power when using Maps to navigate in a car. It's an obvious trick once you know about it, and easy too.

When you're navigating with the Maps app, you're probably used to it chewing through battery life. Even on a full charge my iPhone 5 doesn't last more than 2-3 hours when navigating.

To eke out extra life, just press the Sleep button (top of the phone), once you're on your way and are on a long stretch before the next turn/navigation point (i.e. on a freeway for 50 miles). The screen will blank, but the navigation will continue. The phone will briefly wake 10 miles from your next turn/navigation point, to tell you about it, and will wake 2 miles from it and stay awake until you get past it.

To switch back to non-power-saving mode, just swipe as usual to wake the phone.

To be honest this doesn't save a huge amount of battery life in my tests, but it's better than nothing. For long journeys,you really need a USB power source such as those that fit into cigarette lighter sockets.

[crarko adds: I haven't tested this one, but I will on my next long drive.]
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Hiding Software Updates System
Since the introduction of Lion the system's Software Opdate mechanism has been integrated into App Store.app and the Software Update Preference Pane has been removed and substituted with "App Store".

If you constantly are being reminded to install software updates you don't really want to install, you can right-click (Control+click) the name of the update and hide it, eliminating the reminder.

[crarko adds: I think this is probably known already to many of you, but if it's not it can be a handy trick. I find the whole App Store method for Software Update a lot less pleasant than the old Snow Leopard mechanism where it was separate, but maybe I'm just old fashioned.]
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iOS: Change how Calendar events look in Notifications iOS devices
Long frustrated with how calendar events look within the Notification Center I've discovered a way to change it.

As part of iOS 7.1 Apple improved on the ability to view calendar events by adding a list view button in the Daily view. I have noticed that if you toggle this to list view within the Calendar app then your calendar events within Notification Center will also show as a list.

[crarko adds: Is this actually new? I don't remember having looked for this in previous versions of iOS.]
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10.9: Enable experimental network commands Network
Many advanced network configuration commands can be reached with the scutil command line tool. Launch Terminal.app and run:

ENABLE_EXPERIMENTAL_SCUTIL_COMMANDS=1 scutil --net, then type help and press the Return key to see the available options.

For example:
localhost:~ user$ ENABLE_EXPERIMENTAL_SCUTIL_COMMANDS=1 scutil --net
set "Automatic" selected
> help

Available commands:

 help                          : list available commands
 f.read file                   : process commands from file
 quit [!]                      : quit

 commit                        : commit any changes
 apply                         : apply any changes

 create interface  [  |  ]
 create protocol 
 create service [  |  [  ]]
 create set [setName]

 disable protocol [  ]
 disable service  [  |  ]

 enable protocol  [  ]
 enable service   [  |  ]

 remove protocol  [  ]
 remove service   [  |  ]
 remove set       [  |  ]

 select interface  |  | $child | $service | $vlan | $bond  | $bridge 
 select protocol  
 select service    | 
 select set        | 

 set interface context-sensitive-arguments (or ? for help)
 set protocol  context-sensitive-arguments (or ? for help)
 set service   [ name  ] [ order new-order ] [ rank ( | First | Last | Never) [temp] ]
 set set       [ name setName ] | [ current ]

 show interfaces
 show interface [  |  ]
 show protocols
 show protocol  [  ]
 show services  [ all ]
 show service   [  |  ]
 show sets

 show set       [  |  ]

 update                        : update the network configuration

>


[crarko adds: I haven't tested this one. Obviously be careful before using the commands. I'd suggest making a log of any changes made, and understand how to undo them. This would be a good time to do a full system backup.]
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Paste an address and Contacts will parse it Apps
I'm not sure how long this has been the case, but if you copy an address, say from a web site, and paste it into the first address field (street) in Contacts, Contacts will parse appropriately.

For example, try:

1234 Easy St
Pleasantville, CA 43402

When pasted into Contacts it will correctly place the City, State and Zip into the appropriate fields.

[crarko adds: OK, I'll admit I don't know when this was introduced either because I'd long ago stopped looking for it. Nice to know data detectors keeps being improved.]
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10.9: Run sysdiagnose with keyboard shortcut System 10.9
The command-line utility sysdiagnose can be triggered by pressing Cmd+Opt+Ctrl+Shift+Period, and it may take a few minutes to complete. When ready, the output will automatically be revealed in a Finder window (or it can be manually retrieved from /var/tmp).

What sysdiagnose Collects:
  • A spindump of the system
  • Several seconds of fs_usage ouput
  • Several seconds of top output
  • Data about kernel zones
  • Status of loaded kernel extensions
  • Resident memory usage of user processes
  • All system logs, kernel logs, opendirectory log, windowserver log, and log of power management events
  • A System Profiler report
  • All spin and crash reports
  • Disk usage information
  • I/O Kit registry information
  • Network status
  • If a specific process is supplied as an argument: list of malloc-allocated buffers in the process's heap is collected
  • If a specific process is supplied as an argument: data about unreferenced malloc buffers in the process's memory is collected
  • If a specific process is supplied as an argument: data about the virtual memory regions allocated in the process
The man page for sysdiagnose can be found here.

[crarko adds: This seems to be primarily intended for software developers as a debugging aid, but I can see it useful for system troubleshooting at a low level as well. I tried it and found the output (text) file in /var/tmp, as mentioned above.]
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10.9: Add an Automator action to Calendar Apps
Apple removed the option to add an action to Maverick's Calendar app but you can use Automator to accomplish this.

I found that if you use Automator to add an action an Automator calendar will appear over in the Calendar side bar. Then just select the Automator calendar for the item you are adding.

[crarko adds: I had to play around a bit in Automator to figure out what to do here, but it looks like creating a Calendar Alarm action will do the trick.]
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10.9: Encrypt/Password-Protect a PDF in Preview Apps
With the latest versions of Preview.app (since OS X v10.8, I believe) which save versions of files rather than the old standard Save dialogues, it took me a while to figure out how to Save As... and encrypt a PDF file with a password.

While clicking on the File menu, press the Option key, which causes the Duplicate menu item to become Save As... instead. Then you'll see the familiar Save As.. sheet with the Encrypt checkbox. Enabling this allows you to set a password for the PDF file.

[crarko adds: I tested this, and it works as described. This may be common knowledge, but serves as another example of why it's often helpful to explore the modifier keys in an application before getting too frustrated.]
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