Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!

Installing OpenSSH 2.3 UNIX
In the hint on fixing the security hole in SSH, one of the possible solutions was to install OpenSSH 2.3. No detail was provided on exactly how to do this, however! I had thought this link was already posted on the site somewhere, but a quick search failed to find it ... so I'm posting it now (again?).

To install OpenSSH 2.3, head on over to stepwise.com, and follow the excellent page of instructions written by Scott Anguish which will walk you through the process.

I have not built OpenSSH 2.3 on my machine, so you're on your own to see if it actually works. I'm sure it does, but I haven't tested it myself yet.
  Post a comment  •  Comments (1)  
  • Currently 3.75 / 5
  You rated: 1 / 5 (4 votes cast)
 
[5,227 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
SSH security hole and fix System
If you run SSH on OS X PB, there's a new report on a number of websites of a security hole in versions under 2.3.0. You can either attempt to install OpenSSH 2.3 (available from the OpenSSH web site), or you can disable the SSH1 protocol, which is where the security hole exists.

To disable SSH1, start a terminal session, enter su and your root password, and edit the file /etc/sshd_config. You may want to back it up first (cp sshd_config sshd_config_old), just in case. Change the line that reads #Protocol 2,1 to simply Protocol 2. Remember to take out the '#', otherwise the line is still commented out! Save your changes and exit the editor.

The last step is to generate a host DSA key, while still logged in as root. Type ssh-keygen -d and wait for the prompted save location. Type "/etc/ssh_host_dsa_key" as your response, and then enter two "return" keystrokes when asked for the passphrase.

Now either 'kill' and restart sshd, or restart the computer, and you should be good to go. If you had been using NiftyTelnet SSH (an SSH1 client) to connect to your box, it will no longer work. You'll have to use MacSSH, which is an SSH2 client ... or just use the UNIX command line, if you're coming from another OS X or UNIX box.
  Post a comment  •  Comments (3)  
  • Currently 3.00 / 5
  You rated: 4 / 5 (6 votes cast)
 
[3,977 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
Multiple language support System
If you'd like to see an example of multi-language support in OS X via OmniWeb, first download the Code2000 unicode font (which contains something like 30,000 characters). Unzip the file, and move the .TTF font into your fonts folder (/Users/username/Library/Fonts).

Launch OmniWeb, and open the font preference panel and select "Code2000" as your font. Now visit Alan Wood's Unicode Sample Pages to see a selection of unicode characters for various languages and purposes ... it's a pretty impressive display!

This tidbit was found on the "Unleash your multilingual Mac" page, written by Tom Gewecke. Visit his site for even more info on multi language support in both OS X and OS 9.
  Post a comment  •  Comments (2)  
  • Currently 1.50 / 5
  You rated: 1 / 5 (6 votes cast)
 
[4,228 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
root's daily/weekly/monthly mail UNIX
If you leave your OSX box up and running 24/7 and have been burning some midnight oil, you might have noticed some system activity in the early hours. If you look in /etc/crontab, you'll see that the root user runs some nightly, weekly and monthly security and maintenance tasks. Whenever cron produces output, it gets emailed to the job owner, so in this case root will be sent email nightly, weekly and monthly.

Unless you're in the habit of logging in as root and reading the email there it's more useful to have all of root's email redirected to your own mailbox. As with most (all?) unix systems, you can do this by creating a .forward file for the root user. Read the rest of this article if you'd like instructions on how to create this file.
read more (184 words)   Post a comment  •  Comments (6)  
  • Currently 3.17 / 5
  You rated: 2 / 5 (6 votes cast)
 
[6,065 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
What host types for configure? UNIX
I'm trying to get jed running so I have to install slang first. I finally got onto ADC and get the dev kit. The configure script dies at host type. What is host type? darwin? ppc? rhapsody? How can I get a list of acceptable host types?

Bordering on a dumb question I know, just can't find answer for this.

Clay

[answered in the comment]
  Post a comment  •  Comments (1)  
  • Currently 3.00 / 5
  You rated: 3 / 5 (4 votes cast)
 
[3,908 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
Adding additional highlight colors System
Jeff Frey provided a tip in this ResExcellence article on how to add additional highlight choices to the set provided with OS X.

The highlight choices are stored in a plist file buried in your System folder, and this file can be edited (most easily) in OS 9.0, and additional colors added by simply specifying RGB color values and a name.

Check out ResExcellence for the details!
  Post a comment  •  Comments (0)  
  • Currently 2.00 / 5
  You rated: 1 / 5 (6 votes cast)
 
[2,425 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
Apache virtual host setup tips UNIX
This is a first ... asking for help on my own site! I'm trying to set up Apache to run virtual hosts, and I'm having a bit of trouble.

If you have experience in this area and can lend a hand, please read the rest of this article for the details on what I'm trying to accomplish.

[see the notes for some helpful tips]
read more (348 words)   Post a comment  •  Comments (10)  
  • Currently 2.20 / 5
  You rated: 3 / 5 (5 votes cast)
 
[13,849 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
Resizing the dock System
In the interest of thoroughness, I thought I'd post this "world's most obvious tip" on using the dock. You can resize it quickly and easily by dragging on the vertical bar that separates the two portions of the dock - up to grow, down to shrink.

I'm sure every OS X beta tester on the planet knows this one, but it's going into the database so future new users will be able to find it!
  Post a comment  •  Comments (0)  
  • Currently 1.88 / 5
  You rated: 2 / 5 (8 votes cast)
 
[4,234 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
Using the 'cron' scheduler System
UNIX includes a program named 'cron' to handle the execution of tasks on a specified schedule, regardless of whether the user is logged in or not. Cron does this through a series of simple text files known as 'crontabs' which control the scheduling of jobs.

The cron daemon is used by the system for scheduled daily, weekly, and monthly maintenance, and can be used by users to run various programs at set intervals, such as to handle my site backup program as described elsewhere on this site.

Read the rest of this article if you'd like a simple overview of what cron is and how it can be used.
read more (493 words)   Post a comment  •  Comments (14)  
  • Currently 3.05 / 5
  You rated: 2 / 5 (19 votes cast)
 
[269,132 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version
How to automate a remote backup UNIX
This past weekend, I took advantage of OS X's UNIX core to automate the database backup for this site. Until recently, I backed up the data by connecting to the ISP, launching the mySQL database program, exporting the data, then using one of a number of transfer programs (Fetch, RBrowser, etc) to bring the file back to my home machine.

Although this worked, it was quite tedious, and I would often forget to do the backup. Then another geeklog-powered site had a major disaster, and lost all of their articles (macosxapps.com, if you'd like to stop by and help them rebuild, it'd be greatly appreciated!). This was the kick I needed to find a better way to do my backups.

Read the rest of this article if you'd like a little insight into how I used some basic UNIX programs to handle this repetitive mundane task. This is fairly basic stuff for UNIX wizards, and I'm sure I could be doing this in a more advanced way, but it does demonstrate how the UNIX core of OS X can be put to good use.
read more (605 words)   Post a comment  •  Comments (5)  
  • Currently 3.00 / 5
  You rated: 4 / 5 (4 votes cast)
 
[24,896 views] Email Article To a Friend View Printable Version