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Force Quit in OSX Beta System
My OSX-beta QuickTime would hang-up upon launching movie trailers on different occasions. I tried the keystrokes command-option-escape out of habit. To my surprise, up popped a panel listng current USER processes. I selected QuickTime then hit RETURN. I was then able to relaunch the movie trailer. Add this one to your 10.0 important-keys list.

DP note: OSX processes don't seem any faster than my old G3/400. Any concurrence here? I'm using a G4/450/DP/15" Flat panel monitor
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Change the boot disk from the terminal System
[Editor's note: See the comments for a discussion and link for more info on this topic.]

Does anybody know what exactly happens when I change the boot drive using the System Disk utility? Is there any way to make the same changes on the OSX command line?
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Upgrade from beta? System
[Editor's note: See the comments for a good discussion on the methods of upgrading to OS X..]

I was wondering if there was any information on what the best process would be to upgrade from the public beta to the upcoming release of OS X. I generally do "clean installs"; will I be able to do that with the new OS? Should I instead back up any of my user files and re-format the partition?

I also downloaded and installed the developer tools onto my public beta. Will I have to do that again, or will these tools be included in the release? Any info. would be appreciated.
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Using the terminal to quit a GUI program UNIX
[Editor's note: See the comments for the answer to the question.]

Does anybody know how to quit a GUI program through a telnet session? I can open GUI programs through telnet but can't figure out how to then quit that same program. PS won't show GUI programs so I can't KlLL them. Any help is appreciated.
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OS X arrives on March 24th! System
If you live in the States (at a minimum; I can't check other countries ;-), and you ordered OS X 1.0 (or whatever they're going to call it) through the Apple store, it appears you'll have your three CD collection on Saturday the 24th!

Over on the MacFixIt boards (where I've been hanging out while MacNN's boards are down), reader MacXO pointed out that his order status shows "FedEx Saturday Delivery"on the top of the screen. I checked mine, and it has the same shipment method. Seems pretty solid evidence of a Saturday morning FedEx visit! Now I just need to call the store and change my "Ship To"to the house instead of the office.

You might want to check your orders as well, if you often ship to work for weekday deliveries. I might be wrong, but I'd rather have it show up at home on Monday or Tuesday than at the office on Saturday!

NOTE: You may want to call 1-800-Go-FedEx and verify that you live in a Saturday delivery area before making this change. Just press "8" to speak to a representative, and then ask about Saturday delivery and provide your zip code.

UPDATE - 10:45am: I just spoke with the Apple store. The rep at first claimed that there was no way they could possibly have Saturday delivery, as Apple didn't have a contract for that service with FedEx. I told him that was what the web site reflected, and he offered to change my order to read UPS if it would make me feel better ... I respectfully declined :-). After changing my address, he noted (with apparent surprise) that it was coming up coded "FED-S" shipping, which did, in fact, indicate Saturday delivery ... his last words were "Well, you learn something new every day..." ;-).
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Help for new OS X users Install
Over on the MacNN boards they started one forum topic specific to new OS X users. You can read about things like partitioning, what is Aqua, where things are, what is the terminal, and more. However, the MacNN boards are currently being updated with new bulletin board software, and the thread is not available. But they were nice enough to move the thread to this mac.com page so that you can read it until the boards return. They have some good info, so check it out if you're new to the world of OS X!
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Graphically set the time System
If you do NOT use the network time option (which I always do, since it means never having to set the clock), you can use a unique method for setting the time under OS X.

Open the date and time prefs panel, and use the mouse to drag the hours and minutes hands where you want them ... this will set the clock! Pretty cool, and potentially useful if your machine is not connected to the internet on a regular basis.
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Better disk usage information UNIX
The UNIX environment has two common commands for looking at disk usage - 'df' and 'du'. 'df' returns information about all mounted disks, and 'du' returns information about a given file or set of files. As installed in OS X, though, the 'df' and 'du' commands do not return easy to use information. For example, here's the 'df' output for one drive on my system:
Filesystem           1k-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/disk0s9 3121344 1314624 1806720 42% /osxfiles
Wouldn't it be much nicer if you could have it output like this:
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/disk0s9 3.0G 1.3G 1.7G 42% /osxfiles
Read the rest of this article if you'd like to learn how to create a more usable "df" (and other!) commands.

NOTE: I have packaged four of the more useful of these utilities (ls, dircolors (sets the colors for the new ls), df, and du) into one downloadable archive. These are pre-compiled, and you'll just need to expand the archive with OpenUp or the command line (or the new StuffIt Expander). Move the files into /usr/localbin, and they should be ready to go. I have NOT included the 'man' pages, since I wasn't sure how to do that - read the GNU online help for info on each command, or compile the whole package.
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Show package contents in 9.1 System
Something strange happened when I upgraded to 9.1, in my OS X partition, all of the of the .app folders, show up as files now. if I control click on them, it shows the show package contents selection.

Sorta Strange? I didn't notice this fact on any of the recent posts.
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Setting file permissions on multiple files UNIX
Last night, as I began experimenting with possible successors to geeklog, one package (phpnuke) had an instruction step that read:

"Set all files to 666 permission; set all directories to 777." Although this is relatively trivial for multiple identical items (chmod 777 *), it's a bit trickier when files and directories are mixed in the structure, with sub-directories and sub-files, and different settings for directories and files. The phpnuke package installs literally hundreds of files, and probably 25-50 subdirectories. I was reduced to mass changing everything in a folder (chmod 666 *), and then setting the directories by hand. It took a while!

I was sure there was an easier way, but had no idea what that way might be. A post to the MacNN forums provided the answer, courtesy of "Icampbell":
find . -type f | xargs chmod 666
find . -type d | xargs chmod 777
This does exactly what I needed it to do. 'xargs' is an interesting command, and well worth reading up on ('man xargs'). It basically executes the command specified (chmod in this case) for each item passed to it (the results of the 'find' command, routed via the pipe '|' symbol). It's fairly easy to see how powerful xargs can be, given its ability to act on a series of things passed to it. One note of caution in this example - the 'find' command will search down through the directory structure from where you start, so make sure you want to effect EVERYTHING in that path if you try something along these lines!
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