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DHCP and auto-login System
My computer is on DSL behind a router that uses DHCP. The connection was dropped this morning and Mac OS X's DHCP did not log back and in and get the new information from the router. I had to change the Network preferences to BootP, close the panel, and then return and select DHCP again. OS X logged back in to the router.

Is there any way to make DHCP log back in automatically?
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Running terminal commands from the GUI UNIX
[Editor's note: See the comments for a discussion on a number of alternative methods to making this work]

I have a number of apps/scripts that I've built that can only be launched from the command line. Is there any way to either:

A) Make these double-clickable for launching

-or-

B) Create a simple app that basically executes the same commands I would type in the terminal window

For example, I have a bulletin-board client that I run locally. At present, the only way to run it is to either type the full path to it, put a link to it in a bin folder, or be in the same folder and type ./bbs . What I really want is an icon that I can double click which will open a terminal window and execute a file in a given path.
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iBook crash from sleep System
If I plug in my mouse while the iBook is sleeping (lid closed) when I wake it my screen comes up for a few seconds and then goes dead. Nothing will wake it, except a complete cold reboot. Also my freshly charged battery went totally flat. This happened twice with 2 different batteries before I realized what was happening. The same crash occurs with the power plugged in except the battery appears unaffected (as expected). I am posting this to Apple but thought I should warn everyone as it can stop you dead if power isn't handy.

Mike
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Getting information on disk usage System
User 'pata' writes: "Hello, does anyone know of a way to find the hard disk size and available space short of doing a df -k from the command prompt? Apple, in their infinite wisdom, removed this from the Get Info dialog of a Drive on the Desktop?"

It certainly appears that way. If you do Get Info on a desktop drive icon, you get fairly basic information on kind, where, created, modified, and format, but not on size or usage.

However, if you simply click on that same disk icon, but in a Finder window, the Get Info window changes (on the fly, I love that!) to add Capacity, Available, and Used. So it's still there, but not for drives on the desktop, just for drives in Finder windows.
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Make the Finder remember your window prefs Desktop
Saw this one somewhere today, and it's a good one. The Finder doesn't seem to remember that I prefer column view with about seven columns showing. I set my window that way, navigate around, close it, open a new one, and I get icon view again ... a little frustrating! Turns out there is a way to get it to remember the settings.

Close all your finder windows, open a new window, set it the way you like it (column view, icon view, width, height, whatever). Now close that window before you do anything in it. From now on, all your new Finder windows will open with those characteristics. I'm not sure whether this is a bug or a feature, as it sometimes seems inconsistent about remembering.
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Launching apps at startup System
Reader "parki" wrote in with the question "I recognize that I am likely missing the obvious, but does anyone know how to have apps auto launched when I log in, re-creating the environment when I log out?"

There's at least a partial answer in the System Prefs application. Go to the Login panel, and you can add applications to the list. You can even (apparently) add shell scripts, which opens up a world of possibilities. I was able to add a shell script, but I didn't test it with a logout/login combo. Interesting to think about what you could do, though.

Launching the apps isn't quite totally recreating the environment, but it's a start.
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Use 'nice' to reduce File Sharing load? System
Many people have complained about File Sharing hogging processor cycles, and have reported better system behavior after disabling File Sharing.

I came across the UNIX command nice, which says you can, "invoke a command with an altered scheduling priority." I read this to mean that you could possibly start File Sharing with a lower processing priority, thus causing a reduced drain on system resources.

If anyone is savvy enough to try, please let us know.

-aaron

[Editor's note: See the comments -- nice is broken in the current release of Mac OS X, so this command will have no impact].
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Fix for applications appearing as folders Desktop
In some instances, your OS X disks may display all your applications as folders. When you double-click them, they open like folders to show the package contents, instead of launching. This usually happens after after a crash. There's a relatively simple fix, which you can see if you read the rest of this article.

The solution is courtesy of Apple's Tech Info Library (TIL), which you can find here:

http://til.info.apple.com

This site hosts all sorts of interesting material (I've added it to the links section); just change the drop down to "Operating Systems" and type (without the quotes) "OS and X" to find relevant articles.

The actual URL for this particular problem is: http://til.info.apple.com/techinfo.nsf/artnum/n106241

I've detailed the fix in the remainder of this article (modified from Apple's site).
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Replace the Finder with any application! System
OS X's Finder is just an application, right? So, I conducted an experiment.

GOAL: Replace OS X's Finder with the Terminal App.
RESULT: It works!

Read the rest of this article if you'd like to see how it works, and the implications - could someone write a replacement Finder??
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How to make icons stay in the dock Desktop
I put the 'Internet Connect' icon in my dock for easy access. But when I reboot its always gone and I have to put it in again. Am I doing something wrong? Do I need to do something to save the dock's state?

Editor's note: 'cashd' provides the answer in the comments:

'When you open an application, you see it's icon in the dock. When you close the window for that app, you still see it in the dock. When you quit the application, you no longer see it in the dock.

If you want an application's icon to stay in the dock, even after you have quit it, you must click and hold on the application's icon, until a menu appears. Then you just need to select, "Keep in Dock" from that menu.'
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