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Dock all of an app's windows Desktop
If you hold down the Option (Alt) key while clicking the yellow 'minimize' button of a document window, all of that application's open document windows will minimize into the Dock, and each will have its own icon.

Holding down Shift and Option makes all of the app's windows dock, but very slowly. This is the demo slow genie effect for multiple windows.

Unfortunately, and this is a bug or an egregious oversight, when you hold down Option and click one of the app's minimized windows, all of the docked windows do not restore.

By the way, shouldn't the verb for minimizing be, not "to minimize," but "to dock"? Dock your window.... just a thought.
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Recreate the Control Panels folder System
If you really miss the old "Control Panels" folder, you can (more or less) recreate it using the dock. Simply navigate in the GUI to the /System/Library folder, and then drag the "Preferences" folder onto the right end of the dock.

Control click on the folder, and you get direct access to each the system prefs! Thanks to the X4U mailing list for this one...
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Terminal 101 - Handy aliases UNIX
Warning - For new unix users only... this is intended for mac users new to unix who wish to make the terminal a bit more comfortable.

You can define any number of shortcuts (aliases) to start up applications. For example, to start up TextEdit from the command line and open a file, all you need to do is type:

te main.C &

where: te is the alias you specify, main.C is the name of the text file that you want to edit, and & backgrounds the process (which means you can continue working in the command line).

To learn how to set this up and add to your UNIX knowledge, read the rest of the article ... and thanks to 'anonymous' for sending this in!
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Fonts and memory usage? System
Can anybody tell me if installed fonts (in System/library/fonts, library/fonts or users' folders) are always active and thus taking up memory, or are they activated when selected in an app?
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Navigate your hard drive with a browser Web Browsers
Try typing //Volumes/ in a browser window (I used OmniWeb, but they all should work). Pretty cool, it brings up the local filesystem so that you can navigate through it.

I don't know how useful it is, but sorta cool.
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Permanently deleting a user's home folder System
As an administrative user, you can create a new user account by using the System Preferences: Users section and simply adding a user. Similarly, you can delete a user. The problem is, the deleted users directory doesn't go away, it is just renamed in the /Users directory to "username Deleted". You cannot throw out the Deleted directory using the finder, even as an administrative user. Here is where being able to get to the Unix core is so great.

With administrative power, you are one command away from deleting that unwanted directory. You are also one command away from deleting everything on your system. Here is the command:

sudo rm -rf /Users/"username Deleted"/

If you were to mistype the username and accidently remove your account, there would be no recovering your files. The destructive potential of the rm command is probably one of the main reasons the root account is somewhat hidden (just my opinion).

[Editor's note: You can use a slightly safer variant of the same command by simply adding and "i" to the "-rf" string; the revised command would read sudo rm -rfi /Users/"username Deleted"/ -- this will have "rm" ask you to confirm each file deletion]

Don't fear the command line, it can be a really great thing. But please, use caution anytime you have to use root privilages to rm a file or do anything else. Other than that, learn vi! Enjoy the Unix that your Macintosh is running.
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Share a single user's folder between two machines System
[Editor's note: See the comments for a solution!]

Anyone know how to move a single user's home -- not the entire 'Users' directory? I travel back and forth between two machines and would like to carry my "home" with me on an external hard drive. I tried editing the home directory in NetInfoManager, but it didn't seem to work.
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Hierarchical menus from a folder alias in the dock Desktop
A hierarchical menu will not work for an alias to a folder in a Dock folder if it is created by the contextual menu 'Make alias' command. This must be done [for now] from the command line:
ln -s [path/to/linked/directory] [name of Alias]
-- creating a seamless menu to that aliased folder within a pop-up menu from the dock:)

A related tip: Find the folder you wish to alias in the finder window and drag it onto the terminal window to copy the full path.

I've placed my Apps and Home on the Dock with symbolically linked folders to my Classic Documents and Apps folders (which is much tidier than intermingling and copying over to my OS X native partitions.) One could also create a "Favorites" pop-up in the same way ...

I know credit is due somewhere else, but I can't find the reference anywhere - so I felt compelled to share. Hope this makes your navigation that much better, easier.
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jEdit in v10.0 Apps
I tried to install jEdit on my shiny new OS X v10.0 the other day, and noticed that it failed to install properly. It simply created a folder. So I headed over to Krisko's web page to see what was up -- he did the jEdit port for OS X. There's a not-too-encouraging message on his homepage:

"Looks like Java is pretty much broken under the final version of MacOS X. Lets hope they do something about it soon so jEdit works they way it should."

However, from the comments posted to this original story, there is a solution! 'Mojo' created a package from the latest preview release, and it works perfectly! Download it from his iDisk, linked in the Favorite Apps box on the left edge of the page.
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Building mySQL for OS X v10.0 UNIX
mySQL is a free SQL database program that can work in conjunction with PHP (see PHP hint elsewhere here) to create dynamically generated web sites, such as this one. It's important to me, as I use mySQL and PHP locally to test new elements for this site, and it was getting to be a pain booting back to the Public Beta every time I had to work on something. I tried running the mySQL installer package from the PB, but it failed (not sure why). So I'd been waiting on a new installer package, to make things easy. Last night, I got tired of waiting :-).

I received an email stating that a new binary package was available on the iDisk of 'skribble', so I went and checked it out. Go to www.mac.com, click on the iDisk tab, sign on with your ID, and then enter 'skribble' in the box for "Open Public Folder" section to mount that folder. You'll see the binary for mySQL. I downloaded this and installed it, but couldn't quite get it running - but it may have been user error. It did not install the 'var' directory, where mySQL keeps the databases. You may have better luck than I, so it might be worth a shot.

After a few minutes of mucking around with it (without success), I "rm"ed the mysql directory, and decided to go straight to the source (literally), and grabbed the files from mysql.com to try and build it myself. I was successful, and now have a fully functional PHP 4.04 and mySQL 3.23.36 installation on my OS X machine! Read the rest of the article if you'd like instructions on how to build it yourself -- it's really not that hard!
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