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Launch apps from the Get Info dialog box System
The small icon in the Get Info window in OS X is useful as an application launcher, too. If you have an application selected in the Get Info window, a double-click on the icon will launch that app. A double-click on a document icon will launch that document's associated application. Finally, a double-click on a folder icon will open a Finder view of that folder.

As always, you can still single-click and cut-and-paste custom icons.
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System installation tips Install
I recently went through hell to get OS X installed on my Dual G4 450. Having read most of the public message boards (macfixit, macnn, apple, macaddict etc) looking for answers, I thought I would impart some of my hard won knowledge to the greater readership of macosxhints.

If you are getting kernel panics or installer error messages that say "could not write file to disk/archive" during your install, you may have problems with RAM or 3rd party devices.

For more great installation tips from Yuri, read the rest of the article!
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NFS mounts don't show up on desktop Network
I had a weird probem. When I mounted the following URL:
nfs://192.168.0.2/home/samba
it did not appear on the desktop. A quick look with the terminal, in the /Volumes/ directory showed that, indeed, it had mounted, in a directory named 192.168.0.2/.

The quick fix was to run this command.
ln -s /Volumes/192.168.0.2 ~/disk
Any additional information about why this command was required is appreciated. Thanks.
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Process control within Classic Classic
There is a great utility for OS 9.1 from Clarkwood Software called Peek-a-Boo (PaB). This is the best utility I've seen for monitoring processes that run inside Classic. When xload or ProcessViewer shows that something has pegged the CPU, run PaB and it will tell you WHICH process within Classic is hung, and often/usually succeed in letting you kill the offending process using PaB.

You can read about and download PaB from Clarkwood Software's Peek-a-Boo page.
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Use command line editing keys in Cocoa apps Apps
Ok, here's one for all the UNIX geeks!

All Cocoa apps respond to familiar commandline controls. This is what I mean, go into a Cocoa application (Omniweb, TextEdit, anything that is not Carbon or Classic) and click on any text field.

Type some random stuff, then press CTRL-A, it will bring the cursor to the beginning of that line, which is a common control in UNIX command lines. [Note: CTRL = the control key]

Read the rest of the article if you'd like to learn a number of other keyboard shortcuts for text editing in Cocoa apps.

[Editor's note: This isn't really just for UNIX geeks. How many times have you wanted a quick way to navigate around a text box without using the mouse?! Learn a few of these shortcuts, and free yourself from the mouse!]
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Customize your dock's appearance Desktop
I got this tip from macosx.org, and they credit Graham Brown from resexcellence.com.

The look of the dock is created by 3 PDF files, called 'left.pdf', 'middle.pdf', and 'right.pdf'. These files can be opened in Photoshop and modified, to make the dock look however you'd like it to.

If you'd like more information on customizing your dock, read the rest of this article, and check out the original over on ResExcellence.
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Toolbar tricks Desktop
If you have a folder in your Finder toolbar, hold option and click to open that folder in a new window and close the old window. Clicking without option simply opens that folder in the existing window. Strangely, it seems to switch to icon view regardless of the view mode from which you click [editor - not on my machine; it seems random!]. If you command-click the folder, it opens in a new window without closing the old one.

Application icons that have been added to the toolbar can be used to switch to the given app, saving you a bit of time and mousing down to the dock to switch. Drag-and-drop apps (such as Stuffit Expander) can have things dropped on them on the toolbar.

Isn't OS X great?

Daniel J. Wilson [with additional info from robg]
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Set the date and time automatically System
As I noticed my system time slowly drifting away from my WWV radio-clock time, I decided to re-check Date & Time settings and found that time wasn't being set automatically. Here's one way to keep your clock synchronized.

Open the Date & Time control panel, and go to the Network Time tab. Make sure Network Time synchronization is OFF (click the button to stop if necessary). Select MANUALLY, and enter an IP address for a Network Time Server (NTS) into the NTP field. There's a listing of appropriate servers at:

www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq/service/time-servers.html

I used the actual IP address (instead of the server name) and it worked perfectly.
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Edit your shell config file System
If you'd like to change some of your command line login defaults, but don't know where to find the file, it's located here:

/Users/[name]/.tcshrc

[name] should be replaced with your username, of course. If you don't have this file, you can create it from the command line or a GUI editor.
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Dock all of an app's windows Desktop
If you hold down the Option (Alt) key while clicking the yellow 'minimize' button of a document window, all of that application's open document windows will minimize into the Dock, and each will have its own icon.

Holding down Shift and Option makes all of the app's windows dock, but very slowly. This is the demo slow genie effect for multiple windows.

Unfortunately, and this is a bug or an egregious oversight, when you hold down Option and click one of the app's minimized windows, all of the docked windows do not restore.

By the way, shouldn't the verb for minimizing be, not "to minimize," but "to dock"? Dock your window.... just a thought.
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