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Make your iPhone truly silent in silent mode Phones
When you flip the ring/silent switch on your iPhone, it goes quiet while it's locked/asleep—mostly. But unless Do Not Disturb is turned on, your iPhone will still buzz the hum of its internal vibration motor when alerts that would otherwise ring out arrive.

But there's a fix. You can make your silenced iPhone be truly silent with a single flick of a virtual switch. Head over to Settings, and tap on Sounds. Switch Vibrate on Silent to off, and your phone will be both sound and vibration free when you slide the ring/silent switch to the quieter position.
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Send iMessages from the Finder System 10.8

Just as you can send iMessages from the Contacts app, you can do so from the Finder too.

Right-click on any file or folder, and choose Share from the contextual menu that comes up. You can share files via AirDrop, email, and various social media services, depending upon the filetype. But nearly any file can be shared via iMessage.

Select the Messages option, and a popover appears for you to compose your message. If you really want to send the file, of course, you can go right ahead and do so. But if you're just looking to fire off a quick iMessage without first launching the Messages app, you can delete the file attachment from the message body, compose your message, and send it on its way.

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Quick Look with a three-finger tap System 10.8
Keyboard junkies know that they can rely on the spacebar to trigger a Quick Look preview of a file, folder, or drive in the Finder. But what about trackpad junkies?

The good news is, there's an option for the multitouch mavens, too. Perform a three-finger tap on any Quick Look-able item in the Finder, and a Quick Look preview you shall receive.

Repeat the gesture to send the Quick Look preview back into the abyss.
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Create Smart Collections in Font Book System 10.8
You remember Font Book, right? That's the built-in app that OS X offers for organizing and previewing fonts. In Mountain Lion, it gained a feature to make organization a little simpler: Smart Collections.

They work just like Smart Playlists, Smart Folders, and Smart Mailboxes. Option-click the Plus icon at the lower left, or choose File -> New Smart Collection.

Filters in your Smart Collection can include Family Name, Style Name, PostScript name, Languages, and Design Style. That way, you could make a collection that consists of, say, only English, italic, sans-serif fonts.
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Share contacts from your Mac via iMessage or AirDrop System 10.8
OS X's built-in Contacts app has long offered an option to share a contact's details via email. But OS X Mountain Lion added two additional options.

With a contact selected, click on the Send To arrow icon at the bottom of the window, and you can choose to send the card not just via email, but also via iMessage and AirDrop.

If you select the iMessage option, when the iMessage composition screen pops up, you can also use it as a quick shortcut to iMessaging the email address or phone number of your choosing: Just delete the card attachment inserted in the message body, and write whatever you'd like instead.
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Rearrange the Finder's sidebar sections via drag and drop System 10.8
Rearranging the sections in the sidebar of Finder windows used to be a beast. That hasn't been the case since the introduction of Mountain Lion.

You can drag and drop sections like Favorites, Devices, and Shared to reorder them however you'd like. And when you do so, the change is immediately effective in all Finder windows already open.

Even better, of course: The change is reflected in any new Finder windows you open, too.
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Set up a Minecraft server System 10.8

Here’s a recipe for setting up Minecraft server on OS X. Since I don’t fully trust the server not to have some security hole, I want it to run as user nobody so it doesn’t have a lot of permissions. And I also want it to restart automatically when I reboot the computer. Finally I show how to backup the worlds you create.

There’s three parts to this hint.

1) creating the launchDaemon that starts the minecraft server.
2) how to turn it on and off
3) maintaining backups

The first step is to download the minecraft server jar file from the Mojang website. Currently that site is https://minecraft.net/download but that might change in the future. And currently the jar filename is: minecraft_server.1.6.2.jar, but that will change too.

1) Creating a place for it. When you run the jar the first time it’s going to create a lot of files and subdirectories the in the current working directory (CWD) so we want to create a nice place to do this. It doesn’t matter where this it, but the permissions on the folder do matter. I put mine in /opt

sudo -s -
mkdir -p /opt/minecraft_server/state

Now if your user name is bob then move the minecraft jar into place:

mv /User/bob/Downloads/minecraft_server.1.6.2.jar /opt/minecraft

and make sure the top level folder and executable are owned by root. This will assure that no one can change the jar file without root access. Since the system is going to invoke this file automatically you don’t want it changing with simple user level permissions.

chown -R root:wheel /opt/minecraft<em>server
chmod -R a+xr  /opt/minecraft</em>server

Minecraft is going to run as user nobody, and it will need permission to modify the state folder contents.

chown nobody /opt/state
chmod 755 /opt/state

2) Creating the launch daemon:

As root, create the file

/Library/LaunchDaemons/net.minecraft.plist

The file name is not important, but it’s tradition to name the Daemon for website that it came from. You need to create this as root or otherwise assure it’s owned by root:wheel and can be read. It’s not an executable.


<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
<plist version="1.0">
<dict>
        <key>Label</key>
           <string>net.minecraft</string>
        <key>RunAtLoad</key>
           <true/>
        <key>WorkingDirectory</key>
           <string>/opt/minecraft_server/state</string></p>

<pre><code>     &lt;key&gt;UserName&lt;/key&gt;
        &lt;string&gt;nobody&lt;/string&gt;

    &lt;key&gt;ProgramArguments&lt;/key&gt;
    &lt;array&gt;
            &lt;string&gt;/usr/bin/java&lt;/string&gt;
            &lt;string&gt;-Xmx1024M&lt;/string&gt;
    &lt;string&gt;-Xms1024M&lt;/string&gt;
    &lt;string&gt;-jar&lt;/string&gt;
    &lt;string&gt;/opt/minecraft_server/minecraft_server.1.6.2.jar&lt;/string&gt;
    &lt;string&gt;nogui&lt;/string&gt;
    &lt;/array&gt;
</code></pre>

<p></dict>
</plist>
The above is plist speak to tell it that it should change into the working directory where we want it to store its data, then launch the java jar with a memory size of 1G. You can adjust the values for your system if that turns out to be too much. It also tells it to run the job as the username nobody. And it will start the server when the Daemon is loaded, which happens either at boot time or if you explicitly tell the daemon to load.

The key thing here is that the paths to the “state” folder and the executable are hardcoded. You must change these paths if you set this up in a different place.

2) testing it. first make sure you have java installed. /usr/bin/java -version if java is installed then this will reply with the java version at that path. If it’s not installed OSX will usually ask you if you want to install java and then automagically do this for you.

as root, (sudo -s -) run the following: launchctl load /Library/LaunchDaemons/net.minecraft.plist

test to see if it worked:

ps auxww | grep java | grep jar

does the output include something like this:


nobody          1405   0.5 10.8  3814720 681608   ??  Rs   Mon06PM  25:58.23 /usr/bin/java…

If so then the server jar is running and is running as nobody.

If not then you made a mistake. To help diagnose this try running the command right from the command line.


cd /opt/minecraft<em>server/state
/usr/bin/java -Xmx1024M -Xms1024M -jar /opt/minecraft</em>server/minecraft_server.1.6.2.jar 
note, at this point you are running the server as root. This is reasonably safe, assuming you trust mojang, to do for a moment just to eliminate the permission issues. If you are nervous, disconnect your ethernet cable for a moment.

You may see some java exceptions printed in the process, but if the program stays running then it’s working. Once it stops printing stuff out, type ctrl-c to kill it. List the current directory (state) and you will see a whole bunch of files and folders have been created. So now you know the program and the paths are right. You’ll need to find the error you made. Most likely a permissions issue.

2) controlling it. to load the server by hand:

sudo launchctl load /Library/LaunchDaemons/net.minecraft.plist

it will start when you load it the first time.

to stop the server temporarily

sudo launchctl stop net.minecraft

Here I used the name not the path. The name is one given in the plist file not the actual file name. Normally you want to make these the same for sanity sake. This command stops the server but it doesn’t remove the autostart Daemon—next boot it will start again.

to restart it after stopping:

sudo launchctl start net.minecraft

to unload the daemon (so it won’t autostart at boot)

sudo launchctl unload  /Library/LaunchDaemons/net.minecraft.plist

If you edit the plist file, you need to stop the server and unload the daemon then (re)load the daemon. Otherwise it will ignore your edits till next reboot.

3) backing up the state. from time to time you may want to back up the state of your minecraft world and the server configuration (banned-IP, whitelist, config…)

To do that:


sudo -s -
cd /opt/minecraft_server
find ./state | sudo cpio -dpl <code>date "+%y%m%d-%H%M-minecraft"</code>

this command will create a snapshot backup of the state of your system. This will look like a copy off the state directory tree and files. But it’s not a copy. It’s a hardlinked image. It doesn’t actually occupy any (significant) disk space unless your world is changed. The command names the new snapshot for the date and time down to the hour.

You can restore an older image to being the current state by deleting the current state folder and moving the state folder from the image folder to the minecraft working directory.

Lex adds: I haven’t tested this one.

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Find devices connected to your AirPort base station without AirPort Utility 5.6 Network

AirPort Utility 5.6 could show you all the devices connected to your AirPort base station—wired and wireless alike. AirPort Utility 6.x, however, only lists devices connected to your base station over Wi-Fi. There’s no way to use the app to list off the IP addresses and names of devices plugged directly into the base station.

You can stil grab the old version of the utility from Apple, though you need a little help to install the app on Mountain Lion, since the installer (falsely) reports that AirPort Utility 5.6 is incompatible with Mac OS X 10.8.

But while you can force AirPort Utility 5.6 to install on Mountain Lion, there’s no guarantee that the app will continue to work on OS X 10.9 Mavericks or beyond. So if you want to find the IP addresses of other devices connected directly to your base station, you might prefer another option.

There are several.

In Terminal, you can use the arp -na command, which will list out devices it finds using the address resolution protocol. You won’t necessarily see friendly names for the devices it finds, but you’ll at least get a list of all the local IP addresses in use that it discovers.

You can also turn to multiple third-party apps. One such app, iNet, is available on the Mac App Store. There are iOS apps for the same purpose, like the free Fing and the $3 LAN Scan.

Those apps will, if possible, list off friendlier device names (in addition to IP addresses) than arp -na offers.

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Unlock an iOS device with a Bluetooth keyboard iOS devices

When you lock your iPhone or iPad with a passcode, the general process for using your device is that you hit the sleep/wake button or the Home button, slide to unlock, and then tap in your passcode. But, as our old friend David Chartier pointed out at Finer Things, you can skip a step if you use an external Bluetooth keyboard.

Presuming your keyboard is already paired to the iOS device, you don't even need to touch the iPad or iPhone at all to unlock it. Press a key on your keyboard to wake the device up, and then typing in your passcode. The iOS device understands what you're trying to do, and jumps to the passcode entry screen automatically.

Once you finish typing in your code, your iOS device is unlocked and ready to go.

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Add full screen mode support to apps lacking it System 10.8
Some applications will never get full screen support. Here's a workaround.

1. Install SIMBL, http://www.culater.net/software/SIMBL/SIMBL.php.

2. Install Maximizer, http://chpwn.com/apps/maximizer.html.

3. Optional, but recommended step. Maximizer breaks full screen in some applications that already support it. To add it on a per application-basis edit SIMBLTargetApplications key from '/Library/Application Support/SIMBL/Plugins/Maximizer.bundle/Contents/Info.plist' by appending entries like explained at http://code.google.com/p/simbl/wiki/Tutorial, no. 3.

Example for TextEdit.

<key>SIMBLTargetApplications</key>
	<array>
		<dict>
			<key>BundleIdentifier</key>
			<string>com.apple.TextEdit</string>
			<key>MaxBundleVersion</key>
			<string>*</string>
			<key>MinBundleVersion</key>
			<string>*</string>
		</dict>
	</array>
Use the following applescript as a trigger with shortcut ⌃⌘F and scope per application(s) in Quicksilver (http://qsapp.com) or use a hotkey application, to enable/disable full screen mode.

tell application "System Events" to tell (first process whose frontmost is true)
	delay 0.05 -- tweak it as necessary
	if front window exists then
		tell front window
			if value of attribute "AXFullScreen" then
				set value of attribute "AXFullScreen" to false
			else
				set value of attribute "AXFullScreen" to true
			end if
		end tell
	end if
end tell
Lex adds: I haven't tested this one.
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