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10.5: Set a FireWire drive's mount point
Authored by: ewelch on Jun 03, '08 07:46:33PM

Could someone please post a clear explanation of why we might want to do this? The response to the question why wasn't clear whether this is to prevent an error in a script if someone changes the name of the Firewire drive, or if by setting the mount point the name change would cause a script to fail.

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Eric

Ernest Hemingway's writing reminds me of the farting of an old horse. - E.B. White



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10.5: Set a FireWire drive's mount point
Authored by: Rod76 on Jun 03, '08 09:35:44PM

This helps when you have a multiple boot environment and you want a Linux partition (or some other specific and possibly hidden) to mount at login. I've done this with Fedora: I had it mount a Windows partition at boot, however I've yet to develop the courage to learn VI. I did all my alterations in Nano (a much simpler and less functional editor).



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10.5: Set a FireWire drive's mount point
Authored by: groundswells on Jun 04, '08 05:55:10AM

The easiest application of this hint for me is mounting an external drive to a folder inside your Movies folder. When you use FrontRow (which allows you to browse your "Movies" folder), you'll have access to your movies when that drive is connected. There are other cool/crazy ideas you could use this hint on like overmounting your home directory with a firewire drive loaded with the default home directory for troubleshooting/testing. This is really a nice hint. Just another tool from the unix style toolbox that makes OSX so nice.



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10.5: Set a FireWire drive's mount point
Authored by: Anonymous on Jun 04, '08 07:16:16AM
I see what you mean. Paulio wasn't answering "Why would I want to change the mount point?", he was answering "Why would I want to fix the mount point to be static?", because that's what the hint describes: making a mount point for a disk static.

Here's a good reason why I might want to do this: we have two laptops, and I might want to keep all our iTunes music on a semi-permanently connected external drive, usually connected to the older, less roadworthy laptop. By mounting the drive at, say, "/Users/Shared/iTunes Volume", I can keep the music out of the /Volumes automount directory and have it in a logical place. To complete this requires symlinking each account's "~/Music/iTunes Library", "~/Music/iTunes Music Library.xml" and "~/Music/iTunes" to the /Users/Shared/iTunes Volume/* locations.

An interesting side-effect of mounting volumes at any point (including inside /Volumes) is that files already there will be hidden by the mounted volume. So in the case of iTunes music, with the drive disconnected, I'd put a few favorite tracks on the boot drive, and that's all iTunes would see with the external drive disconnected, and it would keep my wife happy enough until I'd finished adding some new CDs. Connect the external drive again, and these local files are hidden by the files it contains. Of course, iTunes would need to be restarted.

Another good use might be for Garageband or iMovie projects, or any other app which uses lots and lots of data which you don't need to be there 100% of the time.

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