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10.5: Organize data files for networked Time Machine use
Authored by: stokessd on May 23, '08 09:35:41AM

It's a good discussion, but "change the way you work to make time machine happier" is not a hint or a tip. Time machine works for me, I don't work for it.

I have my directories laid out nicely, and my mail all organized, I'll be damned if I'm going to change it. in the case of mail.app. I thought going from the universal mbox format to a zillion files was pretty dumb when it happened, and I stand by that today.

I've got about 90Gb of personal files (including music) and my time machine backup via wireless is about 5 minutes an hour. I also get about 100 spams a day, and my mailbox is frequently changing.

Sheldon



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10.5: Organize data files for networked Time Machine use
Authored by: lowbatteries on May 23, '08 11:46:23AM

I agree with you on the first point - with spotlight, time machine, meta data, the need to organize files at all is getting less and less. I have a folder called "drop box" on my desktop that hold 50% of my incoming files. Cleaning your inbox? Haven't done that in years, and won't. Smart folders are the way to go.

However, the MBOX format is a dinosaur, and good riddance. It's like windows's registry - one file to corrupt them all. Many little files are always better than one unreadable BLOB. It's a huge reason I moved from thunderbird to mail.



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10.5: Organize data files for networked Time Machine use
Authored by: stokessd on May 24, '08 07:52:58AM

An mbox file is a plain text file, easy to parse. It's not like outlook's binary blob. You can grep right thought it. I'll take a handful of mbox files over a zillion tiny files that aren't stored on the drive efficiently any day.

By the same token, should SQL records all be individual files? Think of the carnage...

Sheldon



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