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How to prevent iPhone audio interference in speakers
Authored by: bcometa on Jan 07, '08 09:45:11AM

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What you are doing is shielding the GSM antenna, which will prevent the cell phone from receiving or sending calls, or at least significantly reduce the signal strength. Since the phone has a harder time connecting to the cell tower, it will also boost its signal strength, reducing battery life.
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That's what I thought, but did you actually try it? While what you said sounds correct and makes sense, the signal strength appears to be exactly the same. Adding/removing the foil seems to have no effect on the wireless "bars" or reception (making/receiving phone calls/email/text messages) as far as I can tell. Perhaps battery life is being shortened, but I've still never had to recharge my iPhone more than once a night since first getting it, so at least for me it's not a noticeable difference.

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You might be better off putting it in airplane mode, or placing it in a location, where it interferes less with the audio signals.
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While airplane mode also solves the problem, one can not make/receive text/email/phone calls/web surf, the main reasons for having an iPhone.

I should also note that since submitting the original hint, I've decided to remove the tape/foil from the back of the phone (for cosmetic purposes). Now, I have lined my car phone holder (the kind that holds onto your air conditioner vents) with aluminum foil and electrical tape. Since I only have this problem in my car, and since I always have my iPhone in my car phone holder when in my car, this solution makes more sense for me - iPhone still looks great, speaker interference problem in car is gone, and reception, if in any way compromised (as haralds suggested), is contained to the car.



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How to prevent iPhone audio interference in speakers
Authored by: xfrosch on Jan 07, '08 03:17:56PM

You shouldn't be taking calls or surfing while you drive anyway. I have to share the damn road with your distracted ass.

For an arbitrary modification of an antenna pattern, it's impossible to tell what the effect in a given direction will be without detailed testing. Your transmission/reception will be worse in most directions, but might actually be better in others. The problem is that if you succeed in reducing emissions in the direction of your stereo, you will also reduce the efficiency of your phone in that direction, and at least part of the time that will be the direction in which the base station lies.

You might interfere with the pattern so much that your phone actually acquires ANOTHER, farther away, base station rather than the one whose cell you are in. Theoretically you could jump from one cell to another merely by pointing your car (and thus your phone) in a different direction.

If you were to succeed in blocking energy transmission (and thus stereo interference) in ALL directions, you would also block incoming signals from all directions. That's called the "principle of reciprocity", and it's the first thing they teach you in a course in antenna engineering.

Worse yet, the energy your phone was trying to radiate would still have to go SOMEWHERE. It would reflect back into your phone, which can't be a good thing; it's pretty closely analogous to putting a sheet of aluminum foil into your microwave, or running the microwave with nothing in it.

How often are calls dropped or phones damaged in practice? I don't know. That's the kind of thing that radio engineers might write master's theses or doctoral dissertations on, if they were really starved for inspiration.



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How to prevent iPhone audio interference in speakers
Authored by: frgough on Jan 07, '08 03:24:22PM

When you stop listening to the radio, talking to a passenger or looking at a cute girl while driving, you can give us lectures on distracted cell phone users.

Until then, spare us the example of how you've been brainwashed by the same control freaks that think it's cool to ban the incandescent light bulb.



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How to prevent iPhone audio interference in speakers
Authored by: hjeff on Feb 05, '09 02:01:01AM

If it's of interest, there have many studies going over these effects on real drivers showing that cell phone use (handheld or not) has a much more serious detrimental effect on driving than talking to a passenger, listening to the raido, looking at a cute girl, or even eating. It's right up there with drinking and sleepiness.

As someone who walks and rides his bike a lot, I can tell you that almost all the close calls caused by drivers are by those talking on the phone.



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How to prevent iPhone audio interference in speakers
Authored by: lokon1979 on Jan 08, '08 08:03:47AM

keeping your cell phone turned on while driving doesn't mean you have to answer the call. i don't drive, but i always keep the phone on while watching movie or concert, but set it in silent mode. many people don't like to leave voice message, so keep the cell phone on to record missed calls can be a better idea to turn the phone off.



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How to prevent iPhone audio interference in speakers
Authored by: captain caveman on Jan 08, '08 02:31:06PM

>You shouldn't be taking calls or surfing while you drive anyway. I have to share the damn road with your distracted ass.

You should see the training we have to go through to get a pilot's license. You get trained up real good on when it is safe to use a comm device.



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