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Closed platform
Authored by: ilchymis on Jan 15, '07 10:57:30PM

There's no way that I'm going to buy that expensive a portable device unless it's an open platform. Even if Apple decides to sell third-party apps for the iPhone, the fact that they insist on controlling distribution probably indicates that we won't see VoIP, instant messaging, or other applications that might interfere with Cingular's income. And programming the iPhone for my own purposes would probably be more trouble than it's worth.

(Let alone the fact that Cingular is horrible in the Gainesville area. Of course they have the least dropped calls: One can never place a call in the first place.)

I hate to have to admit this here, but whatever model I end up choosing as my next cell phone, it will almost certainly run on Windows Mobile.



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Closed platform
Authored by: gurple on Jan 16, '07 02:26:38PM

Agreed in full!

I think Apple is missing pushing the future, blinded to the potential for disruptive change, by making an open IP communication device with the phone as appurtenant. It should be an open platform that any professional to hobbyist can develop tools and applications for.

If the decision was made to sell the device as it is without carrier lock-in and only with the standard GSM support what would the customer lose? It would seem to me that the sacrifice would be the out-of-order voice mail which supposedly needs some smarts within the center of the network.

What would the customer gain? I would argue that he would be given greater value than his loss. A choice of carriers and data plans would be at his disposal, a wealth of freely available tools assembled piecemeal as needed, and a step into the wireless IP world where its potential is to do the same to traditional wireless voice providers what the Internet did to the networks and practices of Ma Bell.

If Apple chose this route they would have to sell the device beyond the shelves of the carriers. But any GSM customer from around the world could use the device upon its immediate availability. Cingular and T-Mobile customers could equally come to Apple's counter with hard cash in hand. I think they would gain more sales in shorter time even foregoing and passing on the cost to the customer of perhaps as much as 100% subsidy that Cingular is fronting on the device.

Would you buy an iPhone for $1000 if it were all that it is now as well as having no carrier lock-in and a growing wealth of professional and community developed software? I know I would.

And for the tripe of Jobs saying that it has to be a closed and/or centrally controlled platform to protect the fragility of the wireless network?! Does this "foreign attachment" argument have any legs at all?! Maybe all those dropped calls are because of the Treo owners sshing or whatever dastardly deeds they're up to with their contraband java apps.

The iPhone appears to be a great device cut off at the knees by a tragic lack of vision and perhaps the misguidance of myopic greed. It could be a new platform. But now it's only an expensive and nicely polished toy.

The only constant is change. Let's hope change is in the iPhone's favor.

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We've secretly replaced his regular signature with Folgers Crystals®.



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