Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!


Click here to return to the 'Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance' hint
The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 11, '06 09:02:26AM

Exactly. There's no reason at all to move applications around and put them in folders. The reason I say this is if you have to go into your applications folder to launch an application in the first place, you aren't working as efficiently as you can.

Moving applications in OS X is not a good idea in general.

There are any number of ways to organize groups of aliases... folders in your dock, or things like third party apps like DragThing, and FruitMenu (two of my favorites).

I also use my Mac for audio, and my most used apps (Cubase SX, Spark XL) are planted firmly in my Dock (along with Photoshop, Illustrator, etc.)

---
G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com



[ Reply to This | # ]
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: mistersquid on Dec 11, '06 09:49:09AM

Well here's a couple of self-important prescriptions for telling people how to work.

Thanks so much!



[ Reply to This | # ]
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 11, '06 01:00:19PM

And that was a self-important bit of judging?

More self-importance comes from Apple who advise not to move applications from their default locations or put them in folders.

We gave our opinions and advice... you read too often people complaining when a recent system upgrade doesn't work and leaves half updated folders masquerading as applications in the Applications folder due to things being moved.

Since this was posted as a "hint", which is defined as "a small piece of practical information or advice" we followed up with more practical information and advice, which in my case of using Macs since 1990, I think is well worth heeding.

And what useful bit of information did you contribute to this discussion? ;)

---
G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com



[ Reply to This | # ]
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: Peganthyrus on Dec 11, '06 09:40:16PM
And yet we have this handy "go->applications' shortcut in the Finder, with the easy-to-remember apple-shift-A shortcut. Got that application you use once every quarter, can't remember its name, don't want it cluttering up your dock? Apple-shift-a and dig around. Except Applications is a mess. So we make folders in it.

Yeah, I know, this is the age of tagging and smart search and we're not supposed to ever care about the file structure on our disk any more. Sometimes folders work for a memorable scheme.

Some stuff works in a folder off of Applications, some doesn't. I've gotten used to Adobe's apps not being able to launch their own help since CS2, for instance, since I keep them and their annoying standalone help application in a 'gfx' directory of my applications along with my other graphics tools...

[ Reply to This | # ]

Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: palsyboy on Dec 11, '06 10:52:01PM

It's a lot easier and more elegant to use a combination of Quicksilver and HimmelBar.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: Peganthyrus on Dec 12, '06 09:55:13PM

Actually, I mostly launch stuff with QS and the Dock. Popping open a reasonably-organized Applications folder is for those now and then apps that don't get permanent space in either the Dock or in my brain...



[ Reply to This | # ]
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 12, '06 03:16:02PM

That's fine, but you still have to dig through folders. I hate digging through folders. I rarely open the Applications folder, being that it is such a mess, if I don't have to. I don't even open my hard drive very often.

The Go menu is a lame excuse for the fact that Apple decided that the Apple menu was out dated.. but it was a good place to put aliases. I do use the keyboard shortcuts, but the rest of the Go menu is somewhat redundant, as you have these folders in your sidebar. I use Fruitmenu, and many of my often, and not so often used apps are lunched from there.

I think the OS X Finder is poorly designed in general. I dislike the column view as it's implemented in OS X (Greg's Browser was better) and I REALLY dislike the column view in file dialog boxes, since there's too many columns, you have to resize them to see long names (without hovering over each file), and it takes you too far back in the file path. Once you open a new window you have to start all over again! GRRR! Then of course you can't sort the column by date modified, etc. I use list view almost exclusively, unless I need previews.

If you can get away with applications being in sub folders, that's great. I certainly did that in OS 7 through 9. What I do now is use Dragthing for groups of apps (Music, Graphics, Web Design, Utilities, etc.). I can get to them from any application... My DragThing palette hides, except for its tabs, when I don't need it, and pops up from the right hand side when I hover my house there... no need to switch to the Finder, open a new window and start digging... LaunchBar is another goodie for some things. PITA for others. I know Apple thinks SpotLight is a launcher... Good for finding files though.

You can easily do this by making a folder and filling it with aliases, which can then be put anywhere.. desktop, Dock, or even in your Documents folder, and then drag it to the tool bar on a Finder window, or the Sidebar.

These are my ways of doing things, and I'm not trying to get others to do it my way (my wife for instance...she has her own way, as backwards as it might seem to me, it suits her) :) But some people might find other ways of working helpful. Like learning keyboard shortcuts. (especially Command-delete.. sure beats dragging things to the trash!)

The point being that there are many ways around OS X's limitations that don't inhibit the operation of applications.

---
G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net



[ Reply to This | # ]
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: chucky23 on Dec 13, '06 09:18:02AM

"Moving applications in OS X is not a good idea in general."

What a maroon.

Only a VERY few badly programmed apps and updaters have problems with putting apps wherever you desire. Users with a tad bit more brain power are free to put apps wherever they please.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 13, '06 10:05:30AM
Only a VERY few badly programmed apps and updaters have problems with putting apps wherever you desire.

Like all the Apple stuff? If you look into it, it's quite a list, and not only Apple apps. If anything, the programmers are following Apple's guidelines.

Do you know the definition of asinine?

I agree it shouldn't be that way, but it is. So the advise stands on its own merits.

---
G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net

[ Reply to This | # ]

Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 13, '06 10:15:05AM
What a maroon.

Oh I forgot... that's not actually a word, as used in the Bugs Bunny sense.

So either you are speaking of a color, or you are stranded somewhere...

---
G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net

[ Reply to This | # ]