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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: DougAdams on Dec 06, '06 08:05:19AM
This may not be the best alternative, but you can convert (Advanced/Convert Selection to...) the selected podcast tracks to another format or even the same format at the same bit and sample rate (your feelings about audio quality may come into play here) and they will appear in the Music library. Then you can delete and/or trash the original podcast episodes, if you want. I do this fairly regularly using the Quick Convert AppleScript. Your encoder settings must be set beforehand since bit and sample rates are not 'scriptable.

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Doug's AppleScripts for iTunes
http://www.dougscripts.com/itunes/

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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: synosure on Dec 06, '06 08:34:46AM

Okay, this is definitely the easiest suggestion so far, but I do worry about losing some audio quality. I subscribe to the They Might Be Giants Podcast (as should you all), which is little more than 30 minutes of awesome free music every couple of weeks. Converting mp3 to mp3 has to lose some quality. The iTunes MP3 converter sucks, which is why so many of us use the iTunes-LAME applescript for CD imports. For a 'standard' (aka speech) podcast I wouldn't care, but this is good music...

As for the original post/suggestion, does anyone know whether turning off podcasts in the Preferences (albeit briefly) causes you to lose the 20+ other podcasts that you actually still want to be subscribed to?



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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 06, '06 09:34:34AM
The iTunes MP3 converter sucks,


No, actually it's very good. I run the online music store for a somewhat well known, somewhat underground singer, and we use iTunes for some of the conversions (Spark XL is used for the rest), and I've A/B'd them with the original tracks, and I can't hear any difference 99% of the time.

Personally I like the sound of AAC better than MP3, but we post MP3's on the site for compatibility (for the minority of people not using iPods). ;)

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com

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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: DougAdams on Dec 06, '06 10:22:15AM
[I truly did not want to introduce this sort of discussion with my post, but...] Correct me if I am wrong: An MP3 is not an audio file, it's a file that contains compressed audio that an MP3 player extracts. Re-converting at the same bit and sample rates should produce no noticable loss of quality. I've always thought of it using the Lawn Mower Analogy: you've already chopped off the tops of the blades of grass; going over the lawn again won't chop any more off; there's nothing to chop off. Try it yourself. Convert an MP3 file in iTunes using the file's bit and sample rates; convert that converted file with same; then convert that converted file...and so on. Hear any difference?

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Doug's AppleScripts for iTunes
http://www.dougscripts.com/itunes/

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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: hamarkus on Dec 06, '06 04:18:04PM

If you used exactly the same MP3 conversion algorithm, this might be true. However, using a different algorithm most likely will chop off other tops of the blades of grass.



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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: derrickbass on Dec 06, '06 08:32:10PM

Although, in theory, you could write an MP3 compressor that would adhere to the "mowing the grass" analogy, in practice every time you compress an MP3, even with the exact same algorithm, you lose a little more quality. (If you have some time on your hands (or Doug's scripting ability), compress a file over and over 10 or 20 times with iTunes. You'll hear the difference!)

The trouble is that with mowing the grass, there's only one parameter, length, whereas with MP3 compression (or AAC or any other lossy scheme) you're taking raw audio and doing complicated math on it to produce thousands of numbers, then deciding which of those numbers to throw away and which to keep. If you feed the now modified audio back into the compressor, and do the complicated math again, you get a somewhat different set of thousands of numbers, so you'll probably end up throwing some away that you didn't before, and even the ones you keep will be a little different than they were before.

"Lucky" for me, I have a tin ear, so it takes three or four recompressions before I can hear any difference, even if I'm explicitly listening for it.



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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 08, '06 08:30:20AM

Think of JPEG compression. If you re save a JPEG as a JPEG, it will re compress the file, and since it is lossy compression, you will lose data.

MP3's (as well as AAC) are the same way.

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com



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How to convert a podcast into a normal iTunes entry
Authored by: graemeaustin on Mar 15, '07 06:06:43AM

The Convert to AAC method worked for me!

No script, no messing, just got a Grinderman podcast track into my library so that the podcast can be deleted once I've had enough of it.

Cheers to everyone - and respect to Douglas Adams as always.

Graeme



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