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Create quick-access ssh shortcuts
Authored by: baba on Aug 11, '06 09:47:53AM
I prefer to do this by saving terminal sessions to a term file. Simply set up your terminal window how you like it for a given remote host (background color, character set, window size and location, etc.) then save. The save dialog will give you the option to "Execute this command". Check that and add your ssh line:
e.g.,
ssh -Y username@some.server.edu
You can move the .term file to a central folder and even add aliases to have easy access from the command line:
e.g., in ~/.bash_profile (or /etc/bashrc):
alias some='open /path/to/folder/some.term'
In the terminal the command 'some' will open a new customized terminal window and run your saved ssh command.

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.term files not workin' on Intel iMac
Authored by: texlogic on Aug 11, '06 08:13:05PM
I prefer to do this by saving terminal sessions to a term file.
Yeah, me too, I have a bunch of them on my old Powerbook. But, strangely, .term files don't work for me on my Intel iMac. More accurately, a .term file will do as it ought only if I open it when Terminal.app isn't running. Once Terminal.app has been started, if I call a .term file via Launchbar or try to open one from the command line with "open foo.term", nothin' happens (even if no Terminal windows are up). .term files *do* work if I open them via Cmd-O from inside Terminal.app, but that's kludgy way to call them. I should note that the present Hint does work on my iMac, i.e., I can open an .inetloc file that points to a remote machine and an ssh session to that machine does faithfully open in a Terminal window. But that gives you far less flexibility, as all remote sessions so called look the same -- same font, same colors, same titlebar (ssh://remotebox.com), etc. When you're regularly ssh'd in to three or four machines, it's nice to distinguish them via different colors and such. (I reckon an Apple maven could write an Applescript to add colors and the like, but I'm just an old unix jockey and wouldn't know where to begin -- and I'd just rather that .term files worked! :-)

Anybody have any idea what's going on here with my .term files?

Texlogic

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