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Why are people freaked by this?
Authored by: iRideSnow on Jul 07, '06 10:23:11AM

How is this significantly different from doing a software update? Hell, most third party apps now also "phone home" to check for updates. I've used Little Snitch for years. Great app. I love having it. But I have to say that there have only been a very few times when I've used it to permanently block an app's ability to make an outbound connection, and then I delete that app from my system shortly thereafter anyway.

The only thing that I think anyone has a legitimate reason to complain about is that Apple didn't explicitly say that they were adding this, or maybe that they didn't make it part of Software Update instead of a daemon running in the background. But really, what's the big deal?

As for the "on large networks" argument in the hint, that's ridiculous. I work in an environment where our network is making/handling MILLIONS of requests every day. If each machine happened to make one or two extra per day, that's not going to hurt anything. Give me a break.



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Why are people freaked by this?
Authored by: mstoops on Jul 07, '06 11:17:37AM

I will second this question, this is all just stupid worrying. My computer already checks for software updates once a day (although I wonder why Apple didn't just put this widget check in Software Update), and any tool that automates this process is good in my book. Additionally, every time I open up FireFox, BBEdit, Flip4Mac, Growl, or Synergy (which does not even tell it's set to do this) and others, they do version-checking as well. Sure, most of them let me choose to turn this functionality off. But so what, they to could be just as "insidious" as everybody is claiming Apple could be (but is not), but you don't here everybody up in arms about this.

This is all just ridiculous.



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Why are people freaked by this?
Authored by: wgscott on Jul 08, '06 05:28:51AM

I don't want Apple phoning home without my permission. I don't like services started on my computer without knowing about them. The mail and web servers aren't started by default. I never use widgets and hate them. I don't need this service.

But on a more fundamental level, I worry that Apple it testing the waters for spying on its customers in a very Redmondesque way.

I don't like the fact that ATT logs this and all my internet traffic to the NSA either, despite the fact that I am not a terrorist.

I'm happy to share information on my terms, not on the government's terms, and not on the Apple corporation's terms.



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Why are people freaked by this?
Authored by: rspeed on Jul 07, '06 01:01:23PM

I'm not freaked by it at all. The problem I have with it is that there is no notification that a network connection is being made, and that there is no way to turn it off. I have absolutely no need for this functionality and having it on is detrimental.

So I turned it off (using Lingon).



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Why are people freaked by this?
Authored by: Arturia on Jul 07, '06 01:37:31PM
quote: "But really, what's the big deal?"

* choice.

quote: "Hell, most third party apps now also "phone home" to check for updates."

* Great so lets them all phone home and say nothing.

quote: "The only thing that I think anyone has a legitimate reason to complain about is
that Apple didn't explicitly say that they were adding this, or maybe that they didn't make it
part of Software Update instead of a daemon running in the background."

* That's why I'm going to block this process -by choice- and express that Apple is wrong
doing this without giving me the choice. (À la Microsoft)

It reminds me that the same thing happened with iTunes. People did block the "feature" then
Apple reacted by giving the choice later with an update.

I think we must stop being bigots and protect Apple as if it were a Church.

amicably ;-)

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Why are people freaked by this?
Authored by: FenrisUlf on Jul 07, '06 05:29:16PM

The term "Phone Home" means that this process sends personally identifiable data back to some third party without your consent. The term's on the front burner of popularity recently because Microsoft is indeed phoning home your data to check on your valid licenses without your consent. They have since bowed to the pressure for now, but the cat's out of the bag over on the Redmond side of the fence.

This is nothing like that transgression. Not even if you squint. So being "angry" that Apple didn't give you a separate installer for the program is fine. Being angry for something perceived as an affront to your privacy (like WGA really is) is irrational. It's not nefarious. It's not required.

Coincidentally, WGA was required and was going to BE required to get updates for Windows. This is nothing of the sort. This is quite the tempest in a teapot.

Most people are not defending apple to the death (like it was a "church") in regards to this issue (and certainly this thread is nothing like some I've seen on this subject). We are merely pointing out the complete mischaracterization of the whole thing by people looking to lump Apple with the idiots in charge at Redmond. Claiming these two items as being the same class of privacy issue is indeed bigotry, and as Apple enthusiasts, we should be constantly ready to mention that.

There are far more important things to worry about than this with regards to privacy and the overreaching hand of corporations.

Just my $.02


---
Who are you that walk across the graves of giants at this late hour?



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Why are people freaked by this?
Authored by: Mattbot on May 24, '07 05:39:25PM

When managing a large number of Macs, using disk imaging tools or tools like Radmind is nearly mandatory. These tools will reset the client Macs to the state of the server image whenever they are run (nightly in our case), deleting any newly downloaded software such as Dashboard widget updates.

Being able to shut this feature off keeps every Mac on our network from downloading the same updates every day. And it keeps our install base stable so we can depend on it for production.

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