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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: macslut on Feb 08, '06 08:47:19AM

If you've already burned to CD, why don't you just import them back from CD as MP3s, you'll end up with better quality than using Audio Hijack (which is still a really great app for other purposes).



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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: Jwink3101 on Feb 08, '06 09:14:40AM

really? I was under the impression that with any of the sound recording programs that record what is going out like Audio Hijack and WireTap are 1:1 of the music. I thought you lose quality with the CD because you are converting it and re-encoding it many times.



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Surprised no one has replied to this…
Authored by: jiclark on Feb 08, '06 11:23:50AM

As this question seems to be the crux of the entire issue: how to make an unprotected copy of the file that has no loss of audio quality. Burning to CD, then reimporting *definitely* results in loss of quality (whether or not it's noticeable, and aside from the issue of losing all metadata).

I would assume that AHP could make a recording of iTunes' output in such a way as to avoid any further compression, and hence, no loss of quality. I don't know if this is right or not though. Does anyone here know for sure?

Thanks,
John-o



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Surprised no one has replied to this…
Authored by: brainzelda on Feb 08, '06 12:20:56PM

You would lose quality in both the cd burning case and in the ahp case. When the music is burned to CD the aac is converted to wav in the decoding process in order to be burned. The reimport is obviously then of lower quality of the original. In the AHP case, the aac is still being decoded when played through the computer, even though it's not being burned. So the aac>wav>mp3 will still result in quality loss. I don't think there is any way to avoid this in any case.



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Surprised no one has replied to this…
Authored by: kirkmc on Feb 08, '06 12:23:45PM

Why is it of lower quality? If you burn a CD, then import in the same format and bit rate, the quality should be the same. The algorithm for compressing the music doesn't change...

---
Read my blog: Kirkville -- http://www.mcelhearn.com
Musings, Opinion and Miscellanea, on Macs, iPods and more



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Surprised no one has replied to this…
Authored by: brainzelda on Feb 08, '06 12:30:22PM

That's exactly the point. When the aac was first ripped at wherever Apple rips its music, it used an algorithm(codec) to compress the cd to aac. That in itself result in quality loss because the algorithm inherently removes data from the original wave. That's why an aac is much smaller than the original wave. When you burn that aac to a cd and rip it again, it loses even MORE data since youre using a similar algorithm again. The original data lost is not recoverable. Everytime you rerip you're losing more and more data. That's why people try to stay away from reencodes of files already encoded in the first place.



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Surprised no one has replied to this…
Authored by: el bid on Feb 10, '06 01:44:57AM

This is strictly accurate, but the argument against recompression is easily overstated.

Audio compression systems combine lossless compression with psychoacoustic compression. For present purposes we can ignore the lossless element. The psychoacoustic compression is carried out differently with different compression systems, but is essentially based on the same set of rules derived from our understanding of how the human ear hears. Eg, ignore all data above such and such a frequency. Eliminate data for particular frequencies occurring at the same time as other particular frequencies, because they'll be masked anyway. And so on.

AAC -> WAV/AIFF incurs no loss -- we're simply expanding the compressed data

WAV/AIFF -> MP3 will technically lose data, but (providing the squash isn't too tight) will mostly be throwing away data that isn't there anyway, because it's operating by much the same filter/masking rules as the original AAC compression.



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el bid



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Surprised no one has replied to this…
Authored by: jpmack on Feb 09, '06 04:16:18PM
As this question seems to be the crux of the entire issue: how to make an unprotected copy of the file that has no loss of audio quality.

JHymn will do this.

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JHymn does *not* work with iTunes 6.x!
Authored by: jiclark on Feb 09, '06 05:28:42PM

They're working on it, but saying it will take some time!!



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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: mozart11 on Feb 08, '06 09:27:04AM

The problem is iTunes doesn't burn track name, album or any other info of protected music as an audio cd. I bought Toast Titanium 7 and even this app will not burn protected music (even though I called Roxio prior to purchase to ask and was told it does. Roxxio LIES folks).

I have about 2 thousand purchased songs. My kids like to play their iPods through the xBox 360, so I wanted to burn the music and import as mp3's into a new user account. I burn the music, NO INFORMATION IS BURNED! Holy crap. What good is iTunes the application?

Anyone know how to burn protected music to an audio cd and retain the name, album and all other information?



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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: Eukaryote on Feb 08, '06 10:09:56AM

The only way that I've found out how to do this is with whole albums. If you burn an album that you've bought from iTMS to CD, then re-import it, it will ask if you want to replace the music from iTMS. This retains all of the information and data with it.

I bought a few CD-RW's and did this with all of the albums. Now I just have to get around to burning and re-entering data for the singles.



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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: Coumerelli on Feb 08, '06 10:56:31AM

The CD Name/Track info is only just queried from CDDB database and only "knows" what CD you have because it compares number of tracks and length of each track against its very large database. Correct me if I'm wrong, but there's no track information embedded in music CDs at all - only mp3 CDs and in formats that can retain or hold metadata. The time invested inputing track/album/genre etc into each track (for WAVs and AIFFs) can be gone in a flash if the iTunes database file becomes corrupt.

Am I wrong?

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"The best way to accelerate a PC is 9.8 m/s2"



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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: sjmadsen on Feb 08, '06 08:33:53PM

All music CDs include a 32-bit ID. The track info lookup services use this ID as a key to the artist, album and track data.



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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: JimMueller on Feb 10, '06 01:14:19PM

Huh. First I heard of an actual ID string on audio CDs.
I recall in the mid '90s that the CD cataloging apps (and the pre-buyout CDDB) used a "magic number" unique to almost every CD that involved the checksums of each track and the total length of the CD. I say 'almost' because even now we still can get multiple wildly different hits on a commercial CD: "Select correct info - 'Best of Coltraine' or 'Tenjo Tenje Original Sound Track Vol 1'"...



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Re-record iTunes protected AAC music to MP3
Authored by: Coumerelli on Feb 08, '06 10:47:02AM

because this way, it's hands-off scripted. You can't keep putting CDs in while your sleeping.

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"The best way to accelerate a PC is 9.8 m/s2"



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