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What's being sent
Authored by: avramd on Jan 11, '06 09:03:05AM

Here is what iTunes is sending when I click on "One Week" by BNL:

GET /WebObjects/MZSearch.woa/wa/ministoreMatch?an=Bare%20Naked%20Ladies&gn=Punk&kind=song&pn=%3CUnknown%3E HTTP/1.1

That's it. Strictly speaking, we have no way to prove whether they are tracking this info or not. Logically speaking, if they were going to track info, they'd track a lot more than this.

One thing people seem to forget is that iTunes is free. It's hard to justify complaining about something being free including some advertising, and it would be a little stupid for that advertising to be completely unrelated to what I'm doing.

I don't agree that this counts a "spyware" because it is not watching anything *else* I'm doing. It is only concenred with my use of this product itself.



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What's being sent
Authored by: kirkmc on Jan 11, '06 09:26:57AM

Looking at tcpdump output, there is clearly a cookie being sent (there is text saying "cookie" that is sent after the music info). So, no, it's not as simple as you suggest.

---
Read my blog: Kirkville -- http://www.mcelhearn.com
Musings, Opinion and Miscellanea, on Macs, iPods and more



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What's being sent
Authored by: kirkmc on Jan 11, '06 09:33:45AM

Oh, and this:

"One thing people seem to forget is that iTunes is free. It's hard to justify complaining about something being free including some advertising,"

Are you serious? iTunes is free? Well, its cost certainly enters into the cost of any Mac or iPod I buy, and it is sold as part of iLife. What about iPhoto? Hey, that comes with a new Mac, so why not some ads in there too?

---
Read my blog: Kirkville -- http://www.mcelhearn.com
Musings, Opinion and Miscellanea, on Macs, iPods and more



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What's being sent
Authored by: mozart11 on Jan 11, '06 10:19:30AM

Just because something is free, then it's right to monitor the user use of the thr product. WITHOUT telliing the user. So you don't mind how Sony his how it's DRM music CD's installed and modified the OS or computers.

You use a companies software, so you tacitly or unknowingly give the company the right to monitor your computer and your use of it?

Not me. And by the way it's not that the software does this, it's that Apple or Sony or whomever install it as a sneek without informing me.

It's arrogant and spying. And use to be above Apple Computer. Not anymore. Steves Jobs self-righteousness is beyond the pale.



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Sony's DRM fiasco is NOT comparable
Authored by: shavenyak on Jan 11, '06 11:27:07AM

Sony's CDs weren't free, and they affected the entire computer. iTunes is free, and the ministore, which can be easily turned off, only affects iTunes itself and reports only on activities occuring within iTunes.

If Sony gave their CDs away free, and their software only told Sony when the CD itself was being played, and there was an easy way to turn off the communication, that comparison might be valid. Even then, the Sony CDs didn't have the (arguable) value of providing useful recommendations to the listener like iTunes.



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What's being sent
Authored by: jmontana on Jan 11, '06 12:20:26PM

Since when has Bare Naked Ladies been punk?



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What's being sent.. is sent in plaintext
Authored by: onan on Jan 14, '06 11:01:56PM
I don't agree that this counts a "spyware" because it is not watching anything *else* I'm doing.
That's not related to most definitions of spyware, I would say for good reason. It's still sending your information to a remote entity without your knowledge or consent. The fact that that information is then used to fuel spam aimed at you is also not part of the definition of spyware, but certainly consistent with most common types of it.

It's also important to note that the string that was so readily visible to you is also visible to anyone with access to your network, or any part of the internet logically between you and Apple. I would imagine that the RIAA would find it worthwhile to pay off ISPs for access to these records, in order to search for any activity that they would deem suspicious. Apple's indiscretion has made it possible for your ISP (or your ISP's ISP, or Apple's ISP) to choose to accept money in exchange for divulging information about you that Apple wrongly exposed.

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