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Not the first time
Authored by: earthsaver on Jan 11, '06 08:00:28AM
"This is the first thing Apple's done with iTunes and the store that's really struck me as going 'over the line.' In past iTunes releases, the store and your library were always distinct."

I disagree. The MiniStore is not the first case of iTunes knowing what we listen to. OK, so it's now actively listening to what we're actively listening to, but the Just for You section that debuted in the last revision to the iTunes Music Store sends to Apple info about the music we've bought or own to construct itself.

It all works the same way Amazon does. How many of you don't use Amazon?, because you don't want the company to try its best to make your browsing/buying experience easier. Isn't this what customer service is all about?!

Anyway, this "hint" is one more piece of proof that iTunes has made your appreciation of music a less social experience. Before iTMS and DRM, how many people didn't share the music they bought on CD with their friends and family?

Now, you're saying you don't want anyone else to know what you're enjoying? How better can we spread the word about great artists? than to rate and review music we like so others will buy and enjoy it too. I think we ought to contentedly use iTunes as a resource and a conduit for music appreciation.

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- Ben Rosenthal
Q16 1.25 - Tiger

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Not the first time
Authored by: kirkmc on Jan 11, '06 08:26:14AM

You say:

"I disagree. The MiniStore is not the first case of iTunes knowing what we listen to. OK, so it's now actively listening to what we're actively listening to, but the Just for You section that debuted in the last revision to the iTunes Music Store sends to Apple info about the music we've bought or own to construct itself."

You're wrong. The Just For You depends on your purchases, not your listening habits. As can be seen, iTunes sends no info if the MiniStore is hidden. If it did, then what you say above might be correct...

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Read my blog: Kirkville -- http://www.mcelhearn.com
Musings, Opinion and Miscellanea, on Macs, iPods and more



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Not the same as JUST FOR YOU
Authored by: morespace54 on Jan 11, '06 09:24:13AM

Actually, the "Just for you" section of ITMS needs you to:
a) buy a song or album or
b) tell them that you "already own it" or "don't like it".

Which means that YOU NEED to do something for the store to know what or who you are. The "mini-store" do it by itself, which is completely different and wrong IMO...

go Rob, go!



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This IS different from "Just For You"
Authored by: JimAkin on Jan 11, '06 08:42:45AM

It's true that Just For You uses information about music we've purchased and own to make suggestions, but only information we've given Apple proactively, by making a purchase or clicking the "Already Own It" button.

Collecting information about my personal library on the sly -- without a clear explanation of how that information will be used, whether it'll be stored or associated with my iTMS account information, etc. is intrusive and troubling.

Which makes this a doubly stupid move on Apple's part, IMHO: I actually like the idea of having a recemmendation engine that's aware of my total library, because the number of tunes I've purchased through iTMS is only the tiniest fraction of my music collection -- and Just For You therefore generates loads of skewed or irrelevant recommendations. I'd be willing to give iTMS a look at my library, as long as Apple gave me clear assurances that the information would be kept confidential; that any profile it generated would be kept separate from my personal info; that it wouldn't be sold; and that I'd be able to purge my profile if/when I wanted to, or if Apple's usage policy ever changed.

Unfortunately, this ministore thing is probably going to set back any efforts at getting people to share their libraries for use in what could be a really amazing music-referral resource (especially if Apple didn't confine recommendations to stuff it carries in the music store).

Cheers.

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Jim

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This IS different from "Just For You"
Authored by: Barney-15 on Jan 12, '06 05:50:08AM
Collecting information about my personal library on the sly

But it doesn't. It looks at what you are playing and offers something you might also like. I know it isn't comparing what I own to a database of what I've bought because it offers me the same album the song came from. As Robg said, Apple is not collecting information. Could they? Sure. Are they? No.

I think it is a great service, for me. When I get tired of it offering me stuff I already own, I guess I may turn it off. Perhaps they could collect data so that it only showed me what I don't own. Now that would be a service ;)

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Jim

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Not the first time
Authored by: Blah on Jan 13, '06 01:52:38PM
It all works the same way Amazon does. How many of you don't use Amazon?, because you don't want the company to try its best to make your browsing/buying experience easier. Isn't this what customer service is all about?!
Me.

I don't use Amazon at all because I find the harvesting and aggregation of customers' personal information completely vile. This is not specific to Amazon, but it was an easy reply to your question. Yes, I am in the minority, but as people become more mindful of the long-term ugly side to loss of privacy in the commercial world (and eventually government, don't fool yourself, they're not dumb. When enough information they want is accumulated, they will get it), things will change.

The problem is that once the information enters "the system", it's very difficult, sometimes impossible, to remove it. Now you're stuck.

Instead of the myopic view of what's in it for me today, you need to look at the curve and extrapolate. If people embrace commercial gathering and use of their personal information, it will continue to get worse. At least until the point people rebel. If it's not too late.

Think. At 37 you find some extremely important community issues and decide to run for public office. But wait, somewhere there is aggregated information from various sites about things you read or did or listened to 10 years ago. Guess what? It's not going to be a secret for long. Can you rebuff it? Pooh-pooh it as something you did when you were young? Perhaps. But do you want to risk it? There are a thousand scenarios of potential problems, and all of them will exist because people cared about the momentary gratification of having something thrown in front of their face that they might like better than an alternative.

I'm not saying the goal of any of these companies is evil - they just want to sell more products! But face it. You're falling into the marketing machine's ugly grasp when you kowtow to this stuff....

Okay, enough ramble-ranting. Hopefully at least someone gets the point.



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