Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!


Click here to return to the 'A simple trick to conserve laptop battery power' hint
The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
A simple trick to conserve laptop battery power
Authored by: avarame on Dec 08, '05 07:38:59AM

I Am Not A Display Engineer, But...

My understanding was that LCDs require power to go opaque. Thus, switching to black-on-white would take *more* power than normal white on black. However I base that knowledge only on a very basic understanding of LCDs mentioned briefly in Physics last year. (Something along the lines of, "This is an LCD. When you put current through it the crystal lattice twists. It polarizes light through a full 90 degrees, so no light gets through. So it's dark. Moving right along...") Real life LCDs might be completely different for all I know.

In any case, I definitely can't argue with the numbers. I'll try it; my TiBook's battery isn't what it used to be. Thanks for the tip!



[ Reply to This | # ]
A simple trick to conserve laptop battery power
Authored by: anakin on Dec 08, '05 08:18:35AM

You're thinking of a simple LCD like one you'd find in a watch or calculator. And you are correct. In order to display that black bar a current is required. But the color LCDs used in laptops, are black by default. So the more black on the screen the less energy that would technically be required.



[ Reply to This | # ]
A simple trick to conserve laptop battery power
Authored by: bill_mcgonigle on Dec 08, '05 12:39:40PM

Yeah, he may be thinking of the old Powerbook 1xx series. I had a 170 and bugged the guy who wrote the Basic Black screensaver to add a 'white' mode for Powerbook users. It make maybe 10 minutes difference on battery.



[ Reply to This | # ]
A simple trick to conserve laptop battery power
Authored by: RideMan on Dec 08, '05 06:04:52PM

It depends on how the polarizers are set. In a pocket calculator, you can invert the display by simply reversing the polarizing filter in front of the LCD

I got a reminder of this last week when I was servicing an LCD data projector and got one of the polarizers installed backward in the light engine...!



[ Reply to This | # ]