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10.4: Make the Dictionary safer and easier to use
Authored by: Bioinformatics on Nov 09, '05 12:12:24PM

Yes and no. A hierarchy of apps provides the same benefit that menus does: it reminds you of what apps (options) you can choose from for a particular class of tasks. Working via Spotlight has the same "fault" as command line use of computers: you have to remember the (command/app) names. This is the same basic reasoning people moved to GUIs in the first place...

I prefer the Dock/Hierarchy split with commonly-used apps in the Dock (no hierarchy to negotiate) and a hierarchy of "menus" for the others to remind me of what's available.

I also make use of the fact that you can rename the aliases and generally append the version number of the app to help maintenance.



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[non-]hierarchical access/organization
Authored by: sjk on Nov 10, '05 01:25:19PM
I prefer the Dock/Hierarchy split with commonly-used apps in the Dock (no hierarchy to negotiate) and a hierarchy of "menus" for the others to remind me of what's available.

I prefer a similar personalized "best of" hierarchical and non-hierachical organization/access style, too. Apps with frequent launch/quit cycles are my favorites candidates for the Dock, although I also use it as a "top-level" reminder for a few important items I access less often.

My general recommendation (at least for more novice users) is not to reorganize apps directly in (and out of) the primary Applications folders and instead create desired custom "virtual" organization/access for them using whatever "resources" are required.
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On multi-user systems a "personalized virtualization of the shared system environment" often becomes a necessity, or at least a cooperative agreement. It's pretty annoying when location becomes too much of a moving target for some users because other admin users decide to shuffle shared apps/data around for their own "selfish" convenience.

On OS X, understanding and heeding the distinctions and boundaries between system and user "space" helps keep both running healthier. Even with experience that's not always an easy, black/white issue.

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