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Add 'twiddle characters' support to Cocoa apps
Authored by: avarame on Oct 28, '04 07:48:33PM

Doesn't work like that on my computer. Ctrl-` just beeps.



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Add 'twiddle characters' support to Cocoa apps
Authored by: Han Solo on Oct 28, '04 11:22:00PM

Yes, that's because on a stock 10.3.x install, the "Rotate windows" feature is mapped to Command-`, not Control-`. "mistersquid" has either remapped the keys in System Preferences > Keyboard & Mouse > Keyboard Shortcuts (yes, it's there... scroll down a bit), or has mistaken the Command and Control keys. (Mentioning "alt-tab" -- which does not exist on a Mac: Command-Tab cycles programs -- may indicate "mistersquid" is a Windoze refugee, coming from a land that knows not of the Command key. Not that there's anything wrong with that -- the more Mac users, the merrier.)



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And you are who?
Authored by: mistersquid on Oct 29, '04 01:44:02PM

I'm sorry, but you get the "bozo" award for referring to me (or anyone, including Windows users) as a "Windoze refugee." I have been using Apple machines since 1982, Macintosh since 1992, have never owned a windows machine, and know very well the difference between Comamnd and Ctrl, thank you very much.

It turns out that in System Preferences > Keyboard & Mouse > Keyboard Shortcuts > Keyboard Navigation, one of the items is "Focus on Window (active) or next window". I don't recall changing this from Ctrl-F4 (default) to Ctrl-`, but there it is.

Anyhow, this option is the Windows equivalent of Alt-Tab. It cycles through ALL open (non-minimzed) windows in ALL (unhidden) programs.

Rather than dismissing people who know more than just a single platform (e.g. Mac users who also have worked with Windows machines), you might consider that what seems to be incorrect is actually a product of your ignorance rather than someone else's.



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