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DiskWarrior - A very useful disk repair tool
Authored by: ciurana on Oct 11, '04 02:00:50PM

Thanks for your reply, mm2270.

I checked the documentation about HFS, HFS+, and UFS, the Mac's file systems, and how they're mapped by the BSD core in OS X. Based on what I discovered, I believe that fsck should be as effective (if not more so) than Disk Warrior. The ability to restore files will depend more on the actual file system than the tool, i.e. things like the ability to create sparse files or to erase currently open files (safe under Darwin/BSD but unsafe under Classic Mac OS) that may have an impact on recovery.

These are the items fixed/check by fsck:

1. Blocks claimed by more than one inode or the free map.
2. Blocks claimed by an inode outside the range of the filesystem.
3. Incorrect link counts.
4. Size checks:
Directory size not a multiple of DIRBLKSIZ.
Partially truncated file.
5. Bad inode format.
6. Blocks not accounted for anywhere.
7. Directory checks:
File pointing to unallocated inode.
Inode number out of range.
Dot or dot-dot not the first two entries of a directory
or having the wrong inode number.
8. Super Block checks:
More blocks for inodes than there are in the filesystem.
Bad free block map format.
Total free block and/or free inode count incorrect.

Like someone else pointed out, Disk Warrior is probably the best choice for people who feel intimidated by Terminal.app. It seems like they both do the same thing.

Now, one of these days I should start an open-source project to build a Cocoa front end for fsck...

Cheers and thanks for your response,

Eugene


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http://eugeneciurana.com/musings/sushi-eating-HOWTO.html
San Francisco, CA USA



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DiskWarrior - A very useful disk repair tool
Authored by: bryanzak on Oct 11, '04 02:06:36PM
Quote: It seems like they both do the same thing.
Yes, but they do it differently. QuckDraw and Quartz both draw 2D graphics, which would you choose? OpenGL and QuickDraw 3D both do 3D graphics, which would you choose? Gecko and KHTML are both rendering engines for HTML/CSS/JavaScript/etc. Which would you choose?

Quote: Now, one of these days I should start an open-source project to build a Cocoa front end for fsck...
Already done. It's called Disk Utility and Apple puts it on every machine :). DU is just a wrapper around fsck.

Bryan

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DiskWarrior - A very useful disk repair tool
Authored by: tonyinsf on Oct 11, '04 02:49:30PM

"Now, one of these days I should start an open-source project to build a Cocoa front end for fsck..."


But isn't that that what Disk Utility is? Or does it do something else, or not enough as fsck?

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nomorebushit



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DiskWarrior - A very useful disk repair tool
Authored by: Rusty Little on Oct 11, '04 07:16:01PM

Eugene,

Sorry, but you are mistaken about DiskWarrior and fsck. DiskWarrior and fsck are VERY DIFFERENT. fsck was written for UNIX file systems. Apple took it's formerly known "Disk First Aid" and built fsck_hfs for Macintosh disks. When fsck is invoked for a Macintosh disk it just redirects to fsck_hfs. fsck_hfs is part of Darwin and therefore the source code is available to the public. As co-author of DiskWarrior I can tell you there is very little resemblance between the methods used by fsck_hfs versus DiskWarrior.

When a user chooses "Repair Disk" in "Disk Utility", fsck_hfs shared code gets executed. Additionally, fsck_hfs is automatically run on all Macintosh disks attached locally to a Macintosh when it is started after it has not been being properly shut down. Most Macintosh users run fsck_hfs often either unknowningly or intentionally while never having used the Terminal application.

Rusty Little
Alsoft, Inc.



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