Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!


Click here to return to the 'Create a new user for high-CPU-usage apps' hint
The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Create a new user for high-CPU-usage apps
Authored by: NeutronMonk on Sep 17, '04 10:52:06AM

Yes, I've used this concept for graphic intensive tasks- e.g., I have a "PS7" account (with the logo as user icon) for Photoshop, etc. If you look at the Activity Monitor, you'll find the gains in memory and CPU impressive. My only wish is for a way to use this concept within one account as multiple workspaces- this would eliminate the need for entering a password.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Create a new user for high-CPU-usage apps
Authored by: spnyc on Sep 17, '04 10:58:51AM

i would even say you could use this for finicky apps as well as cpu intensive apps.i have used this trick as well to run Traktor DJ Studio (which is both finicky and cpu intensive) and have had a much better experience. the other upside is if you happen to crash or need to reboot into that user, however unlikely that is, you can boot much faster as well. occasionally traktor decides it's had enough and i need to reboot so this is definitely a good thing, especially when i am about to go on....



[ Reply to This | # ]
Create a new user for high-CPU-usage apps
Authored by: makip on Sep 20, '04 10:32:03AM

I can understand why someone may want to do this for running Quake, it saves the hassle of changing screen res, colour depth and locking the trackpad. Quake isnt something you will use to create data and interact with other applications. Its a game with drastically changed and very specific environment settings.

But for PS7 or other "CPU intensive apps"? Why are you getting memory gains and CPU useage? Because when you switch user you put any processes they are running into the background. If you dont need to run those proccesses then quit them! Or you could learn how to lower their priority.

Aside from the fact that you will be having to maintain user settings over many accounts, you are also creating files with different owners and permissions. Is that worth the hassle? And swithing b/w the multiple users isnt exactly the most convienient thing for work flow.

A seperate user per application is not how the OS was designed to run. It is far less efficient in both memory and CPU to have seperate users logged in to run diffent apps.



[ Reply to This | # ]