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10.3: Mount and use NTFS disks natively
Authored by: bax on Nov 05, '03 11:09:13AM

NTFS volumes can be read in Panther but that's it. You still
need to prepare a FAT partition on your external drives for
Mac<->Win exchange due to the fact that NTFS support
is currently READ ONLY.



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10.3: Mount and use NTFS disks natively
Authored by: adaronoff on Nov 05, '03 11:14:05AM

I did set up a nice FAT32 partition (64GB) on external
USB2, BUT I can't get it to be writeable. It is "read only."

This is not an issue for my ZIP or LEXAR? Any suggestions



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10.3: Mount and use NTFS disks natively
Authored by: adaronoff on Nov 05, '03 12:18:26PM

I did set up a nice FAT32 partition (64GB) on external
USB2, BUT I can't get it to be writeable. It is "read only."

This is not an issue for my ZIP or LEXAR? Any suggestions



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10.3: Mount and use NTFS disks natively
Authored by: wipedaler on May 01, '04 10:17:39AM

I have a 200Gb drive in an external USB2.0 / Firewire case. It is formatted as a single FAT32 partition so that I can also use it with a Windows 2000 PC - great for backups and media.

I/O is read/write. The only challenge I have is that on power-up, the drive does not auto-mount. Looking for a script I can write to execute the command I use in Terminal to mount the drive manually: hdid /dev/disk1s1

I will paste the instructions that I used to create the drive. Instructions below are for multiple partitions, but you can easily adapt the steps to make one big partition. Hope this helps.
- - - - - -
--- BEGIN PASTE ---
I had exactly same problem, this is how I fixed it with my 160GB external drive.

The idea is to create partitions on target windows system and than format them on OS X.

You should be root and very carefull in terminal window on OS X.

1. Create two partitions in Windows (w2k in my case), first for HFS+, second for FAT32. No need to format them.
2. Connect drive to OS X. Befor switching drive on run this command from terminal

ls /dev/rdisk?

, you'll get list of current disks.

3. Switch on ext. drive. If OS X pop up with window about initing new drive press ignore.

4. Repeat last command. Now you should see one more disk in the list. Remeber it's number (f.e. 2).


5. Make

ls /dev/rdisk2*

You should get rdisk2s1 and rdisk2s2 - first is first partition, second is second.

6. Run command

6a. If the drives mount on the desktop, eject the drives

newfs_hfs -v VOLUME_NAME /dev/rdisk2s1

When it's done you have HFS+ partition.

7. Run command

newfs_msdos -v FAT_VOLUME_NAME -F 32 /dev/rdisk2s2

Now you have FAT32. It's not limited by 32G - I have 100G and it works at least with OS X 10.2.6.

7. Powercycle ext. drive.

8. In my case OS X picks up FAT32 partition, but doesn't recognize HFS+ (what an irony . Type

hdid /dev/disk2s1

and it will mount and show icon on display.
Pay attention - this time it's not rdisk2s1, but disk2s1.

9. On Windows go to disk manager and assign some letter to FAT32 drive. W2K works fine with partitions >32G, just doesn't want to create them.

This is it.
--- END ---



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