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10.3: Desktop screensaver trick breaks Exposť
Authored by: dmarkman on Oct 27, '03 07:48:40PM

actually it doesn't work in the same way as in Jaguar
here is what I noticed:
1. open terminal window
2. write there:
/System/Library/Frameworks/ScreenSaver.framework/Resources/ScreenSaverEngine.app/Contents/MacOS/ScreenSaverEngine -background &
3. close terminal window
and screensaver will stop

it didn't work in that way in Jaguar

here is what I did:
I created file startscreenserver.command with the following content:
#!/bin/bash
/System/Library/Frameworks/ScreenSaver.framework/Resources/ScreenSaverEngine.app/Contents/MacOS/ScreenSaverEngine -background >& /dev/null &

I 2click on that file and everything is working as before



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10.3: Desktop screensaver trick breaks Exposť
Authored by: jiclark on Oct 27, '03 08:59:13PM

Uh... Could you 'splain that again, in English? ;-}

Seriously though, for us know-no-unix-heads, could you give us a little more explanation of what you said, and how we might try it ourselves???

For instance, I always used to use OnMyCommand to invoke the desktop screensaver; is there a way to incorporate what you've done into the OMC command that does this?

Thanks, John-o

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10.3: Desktop screensaver trick breaks Exposť
Authored by: dmarkman on Oct 27, '03 09:16:31PM

I didn't know about OnMyCommand before
but I found info about that in the web

so now I understand why it continues to work for you:
I think it calls ScreenSaver from "terminalless" process
that's why



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10.3: Desktop screensaver trick breaks Exposť
Authored by: rae on Nov 14, '03 02:04:41AM
I think this may have stopped working for you because the default shell environment changed for Panther to bash instead of tcsh, and I *think* the default bash behaviour is to kill all background processes when you exit the shell.

Can anyone confirm this? I'm a tcsh user myself.

If this is the case, then changing your shell (back) to tcsh would fix it (using the chsh command). If you prefer bash, I am sure there is an option you can set to prevent this behaviour. Perhaps someone can post this info for people who prefer bash?

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