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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: alajuela on Apr 18, '03 10:46:02AM

Sorry, I jumped to the keyboard too fast. I now better
understand what you meant by "opening it," i.e., that it shows
in the Preview pane.

My comment missed your point and I am sorry. But here is the
one problem with either approach mentioned here: if you do
these things in an effort to avoid even viewing a piece of junk,
then you deprive the filter of the ability to learn what is junk. I
have found it invaluable when some junk arrives to turn Junk
back into Training mode, and then show it what I don't like.



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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: johnseal on Apr 18, '03 10:57:22AM

Does "showing the Junk mail filter what you don't like" require first opening the item, then marking it as junk? Or is just marking it as junk, without opening it, sufficient to show it what you consider junk?

---
Do quantum pirates make you walk the Planck?



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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: Han Solo on Apr 18, '03 11:07:25AM
Mail.app only updates its filter in training mode? Not according to Apple (Knowledge Base article #86190, updated 3/4/03):
In automatic mode, Mail will move messages to the Junk mailbox so they are out of your way and you can easily screen them. You should periodically review the messages in the Junk mailbox to make sure messages you care about are not being identified as junk. If a message is wrongly classified, click the Not Junk button. You should also periodically delete junk messages. Correcting misidentified messages and deleting junk messages improves Mail's ability to correctly detect junk mail.
So, no, you need not switch back to training mode to "teach" Mail.app about junk, and no, you need not view the message -- it need only be selected. Add the "Junk" button to the Toolbar of your Viewer Window (if it is not there already), and click that instead of viewing the message (using the above methods, such as pulling down the horizontal split window bar to the bottom of the Viewer Window to disable message viewing). See also KB article #107401. HTH.

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The filter is ALWAYS learning
Authored by: notmatt on Apr 18, '03 11:17:35AM

The junk email filter always 'learns' according to manual junk/not junk assignments, which is nice (do a quick search of the spam articles in the Apple KB for confirmation).

While I can't say for sure, it seems likely that dragging messages to the junk box will do the same; when they're dragged in, they're assigned junk status automatically.

As for the difference between automatic and training modes, if I had to guess, I'd assume that training mode used ALL mail, both automatically-assigned and manually to train on, while automatic mode used only the manually-assigned messages to alter the filter model. Might also be less sophisticated, and simply change a couple of constants.



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The filter is ALWAYS learning
Authored by: aranor on Apr 18, '03 12:51:53PM

From what I understand, Training mode is just like Automatic mode, except that instead of moving messages to the junk mailbox, it simply colors them tan. This way you can train the junk mail filter to act appropriately before having it auto-move stuff to the Junk mail folder.

If you'll notice, the junk mail filter settings (i.e. Training vs. Automatic) simply change a rule in Mail.app's rules list.



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The filter is ALWAYS learning
Authored by: notmatt on Apr 18, '03 01:43:56PM
If you'll notice, the junk mail filter settings (i.e. Training vs. Automatic) simply change a rule in Mail.app's rules list.

Yeah, but it's the "this message is junk mail" bit where all the magic happens, and anything could be going on behind the scenes.

What makes me think there IS something is that training sets for latent semantic analysis are generally a LOT bigger than the number of mails the typical person will click on as "junk" or "not junk" before turning it to automatic. Training with that level of supervision is also notoriously slow, and even though Apple gives a pretty good default model, it seems like you'd need something more intensive at first. Similarly, you would actually want to stop intensive training at some point, or it becomes very hard to adapt to 'new' junk mail. All this makes me think that there's something else going on behind the scenes besides switching what happens to the positive results.

I tried searches on google and citeseer, but couldn't find anything. I'm getting more and more curious.



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