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perhaps research skin chemistry?
Authored by: sr105 on Apr 29, '13 12:03:49PM

The solutions posted seem valid. However, you might want to look into why your skin chemistry etches your keys while others' do not. Perhaps there is something you can do about that. I have seen keyboards with 10 years of daily use show zero signs of wear and I've known specific people who can erase the paint off of a keyboard in less than 6 months. It's something to do with the individual's skin.



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perhaps research skin chemistry?
Authored by: kirkmc on Apr 29, '13 01:01:30PM

How much do those people, with ten-year old keyboards, type? I write full-time, and I type fast. I write about a a few hundred thousand words a year, probably, between articles, emails and the rest.

---
Mac OS X Hints editor - Macworld senior contributor
http://www.mcelhearn.com



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perhaps research skin chemistry?
Authored by: sr105 on Apr 29, '13 01:21:13PM

I'm a programmer and I assume that there's some average level of typing that we all do. I have seen keyboards that look pristine (like mine) after years. I've known others to wear away the paint on the keys in under a year. I always figure it must have something to do with skin. If you've ever seen a laptop screen with a faint visible outline of the keyboard's center keys, you've seen the effects of the user's skin oils transferred to the keys and then chemically etching the screen. I think it's worth a look. Or pehaps, people who rub away the markings have drier skin than most and the lack of oil aids in the removal? It's all speculation.



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perhaps research skin chemistry?
Authored by: BiL Castine on Apr 30, '13 06:56:23AM

I agree that it's likely related to skin chemistry. I'm in IT and see a large sample of keyboards. Mine never seem to rub away the keys but I've seen others that are almost completely blank and glossy instead of matte. I've always thought it's related to the amount of oil on a person's skin which, over time, can dissolve the paint and fill in the uneven surface that provides the matte finish. I've noticed the effect is more pronounced for people who use a lot of moisturizer on their hands, my hands are relatively dry but not uncomfortably so. I'd suspect that just keeping the fingertips clean and dry would go a long way towards keeping the keys looking good.

I've used the membrane keyboard covers and find them mostly tolerable, plus since you use a Dvorak keyboard you could get one with the "correct" keymap printed on it so anyone who sat down to type at your computer would be a tiny bit less confused when the letters come out "all wrong". Just be sure to wash the keyboard cover, I've seen finger oil actually soak thru them and pool between the membrane and the keys.



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perhaps research skin chemistry?
Authored by: joelseph on May 07, '13 03:25:42PM
I've seen finger oil actually soak thru them and pool between the membrane and the keys.
Congratulations. I think that's the grossest thing I've ever read on macosxhints. =-P

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