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Mountain Lion update
Authored by: zpjet on Aug 30, '12 04:36:36AM

As an original author of this hint, I feel I should add an update for Mountain Lion.

It turns out that ML does updates via the same swscan.apple.com but using HTTPS.

Managing OS X: Mountain Lion and Software Update

So far it looks like it's the end of this hack. You would have to have signed certificate to swscan.apple.com which is impossible. Self-signed one won't work - that's why Apple used HTTPS in the first place to protect user against fake software updates.

I don't see you could also combine to server older updates and sending new to Apple because software updates via IP address won't work either. If only Apple used another server but it looks it's using the same swscan.apple.com - the only way I see using a proxy server inbetween clients and SWUS.

Pity, I had fun setting this up a couple of times but I also appreciate Apple's attempts to protect against malware.



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Mountain Lion update
Authored by: _Tom on Sep 24, '12 05:59:58AM

What a shame. This was incredibly useful for me in an environment containing ~10 client computers, most of which were also used on other networks. I wonder if there's another solution.



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Mountain Lion update
Authored by: zpjet on Sep 24, '12 06:39:05AM

If the clients have "defaults" modification, they will try to use the local SWUS and if they won't find it, then they will fail-over to Apple's SWUS.

So if the clients are "yours" - eg people working for your company do the BYOD or sometimes take work machines home - it's not that serious issue. Just do defaults.

Or write a little Automator or AppleScript to flip the switch. Or use one of the freebie system preferences.

The original setup was the best solution for something like Apple repair shop (which it actually was, AASP in North London I worked a few years), where you wouldn't like to modify users' machines at all but still loved the convenience of SWUS.



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