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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Robert McMahan on Aug 01, '12 09:23:11AM

RSS was removed. Using an RSS reader slows me down--it is slower and takes more steps on certain web pages, like when I want to save a page to Evernote for reading later.

My late 2009, Core i5, 27" iMac seems slower--I seem to get a lot more spinning beach balls.

It also use more RAM--when I open the usual apps, I have less free RAM available and have to use Memory Cleaner sooner and more often. The only positive here is that with no RSS in Safari, I don't have so many windows/tabs open at one time, so it does not grab so much RAM.

Apparently Spotlight searching of network volumes hasn't been fixed.

I like Messages, notifications, more iCloud syncing, dictation, improved Address Book (Contacts).

Overall, its a solid update, numerous improvements, but, for me, the feature removals and decreased performance drops the grade from an "A" to a "B+".



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: lowbatteries on Aug 01, '12 01:29:51PM

Free RAM is wasted RAM. Ideally, free RAM should be as low as possible, to make everything you use snappier.

See http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1342?viewlocale=en_US - "inactive" ram is available to apps just like "free" ram is, but has the added benefit that it might hold data you'll use again shortly. So freeing it up has no benefit.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Robert McMahan on Aug 02, '12 10:26:16AM

"Free RAM is wasted RAM. Ideally, free RAM should be as low as possible, to make everything you use snappier."

That may be true in some cases but certainly not all. If i'm sitting here with 14 MB of free RAM and a spinning beach ball while the system is paging large chunks of data in/out, it is definitely not snappier.



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Aug 01, '12 09:23:31PM

I'm on an early 2009 Core2Duo iMac. Mountain Lion is much faster than Lion was.

Regarding RSS, I was initially very disappointed with that being removed. But that lead me to search for a new RSS reader. Now I'm using Vienna. And you know what? It's way better than doing it in Safari. It's not slower and doesn't take more steps. It actually takes less steps.

I can see all my RSS feeds in one window. I can see which of those has updates. If I click on a feed, I can see a list of all the articles. Clicking on an article shows the story. Vienna, as well as NetNewsWire will even display the web page with no need to switch to Safari. I have it set up so clicking on the story header opens it in Safari.

When I was using Safari as an RSS reader, I would have to look at the feeds in my bookmarks bar. Some of them were not visible without me clicking on the bookmarks menu. That took more work.

Safari was my introduction to RSS, but using a separate reader is a better experience IMO.

---
iMac 2.93 GHz Core 2 Duo, 8GB, 1TB, Mac OS X 10.8
www.david-schwab.com
www.myspace/davidschwab
www.sgd-lutherie.com



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Mountain Lion grade
Authored by: Robert McMahan on Aug 02, '12 10:24:51AM

"I'm on an early 2009 Core2Duo iMac. Mountain Lion is much faster than Lion was."

I'm happy for you. I wish mine was.

_________________________
"Regarding RSS, I was initially very disappointed with that being removed. But that lead me to search for a new RSS reader. Now I'm using Vienna. And you know what? It's way better than doing it in Safari. It's not slower and doesn't take more steps. It actually takes less steps. "

Everybody's work flow is different. In Safari, I would go through all my RSS feeds and just command-click on a link to save the article to a new tab behind the current tab. Then I come back and read it later. In RSS reader, when I create a new tab for an article, it takes me to that tab and then I have top click back to the feed list--extra click. Plus, my RSS reader is much slower opening a page than Safari is.

Then, if I want to save to Evernote for future reference, I then have to open the article back in Safari to do that--extra click. Then, If I want to click a link to iTunes App Store or Mac App Store, again, it takes me to Safari and then to the appropriate app store--switch app, switch app again. Really not efficient for my preferred work flow. I'm glad it works for you, but just because it works for you doesn't mean it works for everyone.

The question asked was to give reasons for the grade I gave. These grades and reasons for them are completely subjective and different for each person.



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