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Automatically reclaim memory from leaky programs
Authored by: gmachen on Apr 11, '12 09:26:54AM

Please do NOT take down this hint!

When I bought more RAM expressly to address Inactive Memory paging, all it did was just put off the inevitable until later. No matter how much RAM one installs, when Inactive fills-up, the thrashing starts. This is just stupid to me; Inactive is supposed to reduce disk access, why turn around and let it page at all?!



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Automatically reclaim memory from leaky programs
Authored by: astrosmash on Apr 11, '12 11:55:42AM

Your computer will always try to utilize as much RAM as possible to make your computer run faster, and this shows up a "inactive" RAM. High inactive RAM is what you want.

You bought more RAM to make your computer run faster. Your computer runs faster when it caches data in RAM instead of on disk.

This script undoes all of that caching. This script makes your computer run slower. It is the exact opposite of what you want.



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Automatically reclaim memory from leaky programs
Authored by: gmachen on Apr 11, '12 12:15:55PM

^ Utterly fails to address one single issue I raised.
Yes, my "computer runs faster when it caches data in RAM instead of on disk," but I'm talking about when that Inactive Memory "cache" starts paging to disk. Seems to me that there's no excuse for Inactive Memory ever hitting the hard disk virtual memory scratch files; it should just be "forgotten" at that point. "High inactive RAM" may be what I want, but it is precisely when Inactive Memory becomes high that the disk thrashing & sluggishness begins. If running the script (or Purge, which is what I do when it happens) "makes your computer run slower," then why does doing so restore my robust performance to that of a freshly booted computer? Indeed, before I discovered Purge, I had to wait for a reboot to clear things up, when that wait became preferable to a miserable ongoing fit of usability-sucking spinning beachballs and accumulating scratch files.... And to repeat, no matter how much RAM one adds, it only delays the performance hit until Inactive Memory eventually fills up. (If you watch Inactive Memory, it often rises & falls with use, but sooner or later something you're doing will not occasion its reclamation, and when it "red-lines," that's when the usability degradation commences.)

Edited on Apr 11, '12 12:21:52PM by gmachen



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