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Huh?
Authored by: frgough on Jan 09, '12 12:11:46PM

"used by advertisers" suggests you don't understand the actual issue. The size reported by your computer AND by the hard drive manufacturers WAS EXACTLY THE SAME. Too many people, including technical types, have been confused by the fact that the two DIFFERENT units use the same name. It would be like saying advertisers were being misleading because they sold gold in 16 ounces per pound while a goldsmith sold it in 12 ounces per pound. All your complaint would demonstrate is that you don't know the difference between ounces Troy and ounces Avoirdupois. It's the same thing here with drive size pre Snow Leopard.



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Huh?
Authored by: Jaywalk3r on Jan 10, '12 09:47:06AM
The two different units do not have the same name, nor do they have the same abbreviation. According to IEEE 1541 standard (as well as similar standards), 1 kilobyte = 1 kB = 1000 bytes, 1 megabyte = 1 MB = 1000 kilobytes, 1 gigabyte = 1 GB = 1000 megabytes, etc., and 1 kibibyte = 1 KiB = 1024 bytes, 1 mebibyte = 1 MiB = 1024 kibibytes, 1 gibibyte = 1 GiB = 1024 mebibytes, etc. There is nothing wrong with using either base 10 or base 2 units in Finder, provided the correct unit abbreviation is given so users can easily recognize which base units are being used for measurements.

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Huh?
Authored by: everkleer80 on Jan 12, '12 08:23:42PM

That's interesting... I have never seen the different names, and I doubt many other people have either. I have seen the different abbreviations (ie. GiB vs. GB) but it never really dawned on me what each one meant. I'd be curious to know the percentage of computer software that actually uses the correct abbreviations/terms - I think I've only seen *iB in some bit torrent programs .. and maybe also in some Linux environments. I know Windows doesn't use it, as the 95,737,000,000 bytes free on my Windows machine are reported as 89.1 GB, and I'm pretty sure previous Mac OSes didn't (I only have Lion machines, but I verified this in the screenshot on the Disk Utility Wikipedia page.)

But regardless of what's correct, I agree that the base 10 reporting of sizes should be the standard. If a drive is advertised as 500 GB, I want my computer to report it as 500 GB.



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Huh?
Authored by: _Gekko_ on Jan 17, '12 11:00:07PM

The kibi,mebi etc stuff are quite recent units specifically created to tell the difference between the two.
Before their existence the difference could be shown by using kb or kB, but that didn't really work out very well ...



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Huh?
Authored by: Jaywalk3r on Jan 18, '12 01:08:15AM

The binary unit prefixes aren't terribly recent. They've been around for awhile (~15 years, IIRC) albeit not the centuries that the base ten unit prefixes have existed.



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