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Use a laptop as a mobile wireless power meter
Authored by: dankna on Apr 08, '10 01:00:12PM

They're not microwaves. They're radio waves. Microwaves would cook you!

But very useful tip, thanks!



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Use a laptop as a mobile wireless power meter
Authored by: ALT147 on Apr 08, '10 05:56:31PM
Actually, they are microwaves, and, interestingly, they are at almost the same frequency (2.45 GHz) as those in your microwave oven. I'm not sure why that band was chosen.

But, in any case, the power present in your oven is in the hundreds of watts to kilowatts, whereas the power level sitting a metre away from a strong wireless router is less than -20 dBm, which is 0.00001 W. The power from the router I'm connected to now is -84 dBm, which is less than 0.00000000001 W. So we're probably OK.

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Use a laptop as a mobile wireless power meter
Authored by: barko192 on Apr 08, '10 07:43:30PM

Just because EMR is in the microwave band, doesn't mean it will warm food. The 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz frequencies that wireless routers operate on are actually in the microwave band of 300 MHz to 300 GHz, the microwave band is a subset of the radio band of 3 kHz to 300 GHz.

Only microwaves of a specific frequency warm food, because the energy per microwave photon corresponds to a ro-vibronic energy transition in the water molecule.

For more info check out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microwave_oven



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Use a laptop as a mobile wireless power meter
Authored by: ALT147 on Apr 11, '10 03:51:26PM
Only microwaves of a specific frequency warm food, because the energy per microwave photon corresponds to a ro-vibronic energy transition in the water molecule.
In fact, microwaves of anywhere from 1 GHz to a few hundred GHz will warm food. See this page for far too much detail. I just thought it odd that the frequency of a microwave oven coincided with channels 7, 8 and 9 of the 802.11 standard. Even though the power levels may be way too low to heat anything (or anyone), surely you'd choose a band far away from any commonplace, powerful source like a microwave oven for the sake of interference?

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