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10.5: Reconnect Time Machine backup after drive swap
Authored by: only_solutions on Mar 20, '10 10:00:28AM

I don't have a Time Capsule, so I cannot say much about the details.

This hint is somewhat crude in how it deals with the extended attributes, by disabling their observance for the entire drive, then making changes and finally restoring normal operation.

This might be where you're running into a problem.

In principle it should be possible to directly disable the change protection attribute of the respective folder, then make the UUID change as described and after that re-enable the protection attribute again.

I admit that this will be a necessary update to this hint which I just have not had the time to do so far.

On the other side, I actually think changing the UUID of your system disk should work.

You should just be absolutely certain that the original drive is truly gone and will never be connected to the same machine again. And I would recommend a restart right after making the change.

Having a current backup is of course absolutely mandatory, but since you've restored it from your backup, that should be the case.

I can't vouch for this being without hickups it is possible that there are some mechanisms which might have registered the present UUID and which might act up a bit. But it might just work.

Good luck! :-)

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There are no problems...



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10.5: Reconnect Time Machine backup after drive swap
Authored by: rich k on Mar 21, '10 06:23:15PM

Thanks for this.
I still have the external CCC backup, but since I've been using the internal drive for a few weeks now, they no longer match. I think what I will do is another CCC clone before I try changing the UUID on the boot drive. Question though - if changing the UUID on the new internal drive DOES cause major problems, will CCCing back the contents of the external drive also revert the UUID of the new internal drive, or would I still need to change that back?
I'm suspecting the UUID won't revert, since otherwise it would have reverted when I first moved the cloned drive back.



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10.5: Reconnect Time Machine backup after drive swap
Authored by: only_solutions on Mar 21, '10 07:04:06PM
I can't be certain, but I would also expect CCC to leave the UUID alone, so in case you needed to restore the backup with CCC, you might have to revert the UUID as well (be sure to make a separate note of the original UUID on the backup drive before changing it on the system drive).

I would also recommend you to make the fresh backup to a different drive than the original CCC one if at all possible.

I know I sound paranoid, but that is only proper when dealing with the entirety of your data.

Don't Panic! But nevertheless be cautious! 8-)

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There are no problems...


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10.5: Reconnect Time Machine backup after drive swap
Authored by: rich k on Mar 24, '10 03:31:03PM

Now I have to confess to being Terminally illiterate. So:
- do I boot from a different volume when I attempt to change the UUID on my normal boot drive, or can I do it while booted from that volume?
- what is the full path to the root of a boot drive?
- do I need to log in as root admin, or can I log in via my usual user account?
- is there an easier way to change this UUID?
I've searched extensively and haven't found references to any of this online - is there a reference book or source, no matter how wonky, that I can but?
Thanks so much for tolerating me. I can make a dozen major apps dance and sing, but Terminal is NOT one of them.



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10.5: Reconnect Time Machine backup after drive swap
Authored by: only_solutions on Mar 27, '10 04:48:07AM
- do I boot from a different volume when I attempt to change the UUID on my normal boot drive, or can I do it while booted from that volume?

That is probably a good idea in order to avoid potential confusion, although it should not be absolutely necessary. If you do it while running from that same volume, just be sure to complete the change and then restart the system right away so the change will take effect.

- what is the full path to the root of a boot drive?

Just / .

All other volumes are mounted under /Volumes/ . You can find the path by simply dropping a file, folder or even a drive into a Terminal window: The respective path is then automatically inserted into the current input line.

- do I need to log in as root admin, or can I log in via my usual user account?

Calling the respective functions via sudo already takes care of that (your account must be enabled as an admin account for this, and you will be asked for your password on execution). But there is no need to explicitly log in as root.

- is there an easier way to change this UUID?

Not to my knowledge. Normally it is not supposed to be done, so it shouldn't be easy, really. ;-)

I've searched extensively and haven't found references to any of this online - is there a reference book or source, no matter how wonky, that I can but?

I'm not aware of a book (which could well exist), but for some of the background the articles by John Siracusa on ars technica about Mac OS X are quite interesting.

Thanks so much for tolerating me. I can make a dozen major apps dance and sing, but Terminal is NOT one of them.

No problem I always recommend anyone to be careful about treading unfamiliar ground, but I'll try to help where I can. :-)---
There are no problems...

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There are no problems...
Edited on Mar 27, '10 04:56:34AM by only_solutions


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10.5: Reconnect Time Machine backup after drive swap
Authored by: rich k on Apr 15, '10 12:08:59PM

Final outcome:
I restored the FSACLCTL command using Pacifist from my 10.5 install disk. I then attempted to change the UUID of the backup sparsebundle file on my Time Capsule. This appeared to work, but didn't.
SO, after running one more CCC backup of my boot drive for safety, I changed my boot drive UUID to match the back up UUID. That nailed it. Unfortunately, in the meantime I had lost many of the older back up iterations as Time Machine, thinking the older backups to be from a different Mac, erased them one by one while methodically bringing the data "up to date". But at least I have back ups from Oct. 09 forward, instead of none at all.
Bottom line - if at all possible, use Time Machine to restore into a new drive, rather than Carbon Copy Cloner or another drive-to-drive copy. But if, like me, that is not an option, and you've been using a network-based backup scheme like a Time Capsule, changing the new drive's UUID will work.



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