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Why do this?
Authored by: Sven G on Sep 02, '02 02:50:44AM

No particular advantage from a performance point of view (at least AFAIK); it just might make things a little more "ordered" (for example, no visible OS 9 System Folder at the roor of your hard drive)- and, above all, it feels somewhat "geeky" to have Classic load in a manner similar to Virtual PC (an entire OS on a disk image) and make it depend on OS X for it's "existence" (no autonomous booting)...



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Why do this?
Authored by: Sven G on Sep 02, '02 02:52:48AM

... Damn! Root, not "roor"... :-)



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Why do this?
Authored by: houchin on Sep 03, '02 10:47:05PM

The best reason I can see for doing this is dealing with the installation of Carbon apps that want to set themselves up to run both in X and in 9. The Adobe apps are good examples. They put all of their application support stuff in your OS 9 Application Support folder, then put aliases in the OS X folder. If you were to delete your OS 9 system folder, you'd loose a lot of stuff.

With your Classic folder in a disk image, you can ensure that it's not mounted when you install any Carbon application, and keep the OS 9 system clean for just use as Classic.



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