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Click here to return to the 'Disable Firefox's Command-Arrows page jump shortcuts' hint
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Disable Firefox's Command-Arrows page jump shortcuts
Authored by: bengarland on Jan 23, '09 11:09:51AM

This hint is not really needed. The author is using the wrong key commands. You shouldn't be using CMD-Arrow to move around in text boxes. Using the Control key commands below is more efficient and thorough.

The correct commands are (originally from Emacs)...

CURSOR MOVEMENT:

<CTRL>f move the cursor forward one character.

<CTRL>b move the cursor backward one character.

<CTRL>e move the cursor to the end of the current line.

<CTRL>a move the cursor to the beginning of the current line.

<CTRL>p move the cursor to the previous line.

<CTRL>n move the cursor to the next line.

TEXT MANIPULATION:

<CTRL>o open a new line at the cursor.

<CTRL>d delete the character at the cursor.

<CTRL>k kill from the cursor to the end of the current line.

<CTRL>t transpose the character at the cursor with the one to the left of it

<CTRL>y yank back (restore) the most recent deletion done by any of the above kill commands or by a copy.



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Disable Firefox's Command-Arrows page jump shortcuts
Authored by: palahala on Jan 23, '09 01:11:09PM
Ok, you may have a point here: if these shortcuts work for all programs then learning them might be a good idea. But the text input that I am using right now to write this very comment, does not recognize Ctrl-O, Ctrl-T and Ctrl-Y -- not too important to me, but: why? Furthermore, I simply feel that Command-Arrow should behave the same in each program.

Those who're following the labels on small keyboards might use Fn-Arrow rather than Command-Arrow to get Home, End, Page Up and Page Down. However, those will soon find that programs behave differently for Fn-Arrow. For example: TextEdit seems to ignore Fn-Left (while Command-Left goes to the start of the current line), and Fn-Up scrolls without moving the caret (while Command-Up moves the cursor to the start of the document). Some programs handle Fn-Up as "start of document", while others make the cursor move the start of the line. While still using NeoOffice, I have often swapped two lines by hitting Command-Arrow or Fn-Arrow... So yes, I should have learned the Ctrl shortcuts ;-)

In my experience, Cmd-Arrow behaves the same in many programs I use today. If not, then it's never too destructive -- apart from loosing text in Firefox.

As for robg's remark: when using the example at http://tinymce.moxiecode.com/ then one might indeed not really lose any text when, after accidentally moving away from the editor using Command-Left, one goes back to the editor (using Command-Right). However, many of those editors are populated using JavaScript. Using, for example, rich text editors in the TYPO3 CMS I have lost my changes many times, as moving back to the editor simply loaded the existing content from the database.


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Re: Disable Firefox's Command-Arrows page jump shortcuts
Authored by: Uncle Asad on Jan 23, '09 06:24:30PM
This hint is not really needed. The author is using the wrong key commands. You shouldn't be using CMD-Arrow to move around in text boxes.

"Wrong" says who? Cmd-Left Arrow has always moved to the beginning of the line (and Cmd-Right Arrow to the end of the line) in the "classic" Mac OS and in Mac OS X.

There's no reason why users shouldn't expect standard Mac OS X key bindings to work everywhere; this is clearly a bug in Firefox.

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Re: Disable Firefox's Command-Arrows page jump shortcuts
Authored by: palahala on Jan 24, '09 05:05:25AM

Thanks for that great link to the Apple Human Interface Guidelines.

I assume that holding down Fn on small Apple keyboards, while pressing Left Arrow or Right Arrow, will in fact send a program the keycodes for Home and End just as the key labels show. In other words: I assume programs do not need to detect Fn themselves. This makes me wonder why even Apple's TextEdit does not follow the guidelines for those keys...

Home, End

Pressing the Home key is equivalent to moving the scrollers all the way to the top and to the left. In a text document, for example, pressing Home scrolls to the beginning of the document; in a spreadsheet, it may scroll to the beginning of the spreadsheet or to the beginning of a row. These keys should also work in scrolling lists to display the top or bottom of the list.

End is the opposite of Home: It scrolls to the end of a document.

If the beginning or end of the document is already reached, pressing Home or End produces a system alert sound. Pressing the Home or End key has no effect on the location of the insertion point or selected data.

I also find it odd that Apple has introduced new keyboard layouts on 2nd or 3rd generation MacBooks and the aluminum keyboards, using F3 for Exposť and F4 for Dashboard -- while the guidelines still only mention F9-F12 as being reserved.

And finally, I never understood why Apple cannot sell the US keyboard layout in Europe -- not even when specifically asked to do so. I know, layout and keycodes are not the same thing. But here in the Netherlands we get a very tiny Return key, and an odd location of the backtick, to the left of the Z-key.



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Disable Firefox's Command-Arrows page jump shortcuts
Authored by: ret on Jan 28, '09 05:23:50PM
What an outrageous idea! It's not the user doing the wrong thing when FF breaks conventions used (virtually) everywhere else. Adherence to HIG principles and conventions is a big part of what makes the Mac experience.

Now, if the key-bindings matched Vi instead of Emacs, that would be another story. ** He says, ducking for cover ;-) **

---
perl -e 'require Signature.pm; srand; printf STDOUT "%s\n", $Signature[rand @Signature];'

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