Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!


Click here to return to the 'How to make sure Mail sends font info with messages' hint
The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
How to make sure Mail sends font info with messages
Authored by: dmmorse on Nov 25, '08 08:25:48AM

Personally, I find it very annoying receiving messages from friends and family when the message dictates some odd font to display the message. I prefer to read things in my chosen font precisely because that makes it easier for me to read. I therefore very much appreciate the manner in which Apple has chosen to handle fonts within email messages.



[ Reply to This | # ]
How to make sure Mail sends font info with messages
Authored by: Anonymous on Nov 25, '08 08:48:03AM

I just tell people that if they want to send a Web page, send a URL, and I'll browse it in my own time. Email is for information, not nutty pictures and oddball fonts.



[ Reply to This | # ]
How to make sure Mail sends font info with messages
Authored by: sjmills on Nov 25, '08 09:29:58PM

Ya got that right. Email is for plain text. 18pt blue Comic Sans is for 7-year olds, not developer mailing lists or anything else work-related.



[ Reply to This | # ]
How to make sure Mail sends font info with messages
Authored by: Mac Berry on Nov 27, '08 12:39:59AM
E mail is a form of communication, that should be as expressive as any other, as far as the technology allows anyway. No-one would dream of suggesting that typed letters should all arrive in a default font, because that removes the writers right to express themselves as they see fit.

Of course the reader has the right to judge the sender based on his choices, so that if the senders presentation is poor, that should affect how the receiver responds, but that's up to the sender. If someone sending me grown up information is childish enough to think a silly font is appropriate for their message, I want to know that.

The benefit of the technology is that the reader can change things after receipt if that makes it easier for him, but I think it's wrong, in fact plain rude, to ignore the effort the sender has put into expressing himself right from the outset.

From a practical point of view, font changes etc can be used very effectively to help get a point across. I understand that if all you use e-mail for is exchanging technical facts, there's probably no need, but not all of us can limit our communications to that, and anyway, what's wrong with having an "e-mail voice" that's distinct from other people's?

If you accept the plain fact that presentation matters (and it should, even in this "u r gr8 m8" era), then the tools need to be there to allow presentation to be adjusted.

Mark

[ Reply to This | # ]