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Save on mobile bandwidth by disabling remote images in iOS Mail iOS devices
I've just moved from a country where I had unlimited (really) data on my iPhone contract to one where data plans are metered and expensive. So this recent article by David Chartier, on the Finer Things in Tech web site, comes at the right time. It points out the simple setting in iOS to turn off automatic loading of images in Mail. As with Mail on OS X, you can load images later, but you won't need to load them for every message, saving download time and bandwidth.

To change this setting, go to Settings > Mail, Contacts & Calendars, and toggle Load Remote Images to OFF. If you get an email with images, and want to see them, just tap on Load All Images in the message.

This setting would make more sense if it only affected image downloads when using cellular data. But it's an all-or-nothing choice, so even when you connect via Wi-Fi, you'll need to download images manually, if you use this setting.
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Save on mobile bandwidth by disabling remote images in iOS Mail
Authored by: cpragman on May 04, '13 06:28:35AM

This has a side benefit as well. When opening an e-mail from those mass-marketing types (spam) that use URL tracking for their embedded images, they don't get a confirmation that you read their e-mail, and thus don't get confirmation that they are sending spam to a valid user.



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This is a privacy option!
Authored by: fab23 on May 04, '13 06:34:39AM

Hello Kirk

This setting is a privacy option and the bandwidth saving is just a nice side effect. As I understand, it does disable the loading of remote images in HTML e-mail (if they are not sent with the e-mail itself), which is a good thing anyway. If you allow the loading of such remote images, then this is used to track you if and when you are reading the message. The remote images are loaded through an URL (link) with an unique ID directly from the website of the entity sending you the e-mail.

bye
Fabian



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