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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad iOS devices
Sometimes when calling other countries, I have trouble getting through. For some reason, my phone provider seems to not like numbers with the 00 prefix (the international access code from France), though I never have problems with numbers beginning with + saved in my Contacts.

Rob Griffiths, during a chat the other day, found that if you press and hold the 0 button on the number pad, it types a + character. So to make an international call, all I need to do is press that button, then enter the country code and the number. This will make my international calls a bit easier, at least for people who are not contacts, and who I don't want to make contact cards for.

It's worth noting that pressing any of the other keys, the ones that show letters, such as ABC, only types the number. I guess the fact that the + is on the 0 button makes one think there's a way to get it to display; I had tried in the past, but didn't hold it long enough.
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'0' equals '+'
Authored by: flmiller on Jan 21, '13 07:46:15AM

Holding the '0' key to get the '+' symbol (the common international phone access code in many countries) is normal behavior in most phones. There may be some phones sold for US only use that do not do this, but certainly all GSM phones I have encountered function this way, and have for many years.

Frank



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: Reaperducer on Jan 21, '13 07:53:27AM

This isn't exactly an iPhone feature. This has been standard on almost every cell phone for decades. I remember doing it as least as far back as my Ericsson in 1997. Of all the cell phones I've had over the last 20 years, I can't think of any that didn't have this feature.



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: Arcank on Jan 21, '13 08:06:59AM

As a best practice, I enter every phone number with +(country code) (phone number).

That way, wherever you are in the world, your phone numbers remain valid. Also calling any international number from your location gets through.

---
Louis | Arcank



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: Azathoth on Jan 21, '13 08:37:08AM

This is a hint? ALL of my contacts numbers are saved with a + prefix and the country code, even the ones that are local numbers (in case I call them from out of country). Most of them I put in on directly on my phone. How else should I type the + char then holding the 0 key?



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: seika7 on Jan 21, '13 08:57:14AM

Thanks for the tip; I never knew that.

Here are the photos to go with this hint for Arrested Development fans:

http://www.commutercars.com/bryan/images/2013/ArrestedDevelopmentForBritishEyesOnlyCallMe1.png
http://www.commutercars.com/bryan/images/2013/ArrestedDevelopmentForBritishEyesOnlyCallMe2.png
http://www.commutercars.com/bryan/images/2013/ArrestedDevelopmentForBritishEyesOnlyCallMe3.png
http://www.commutercars.com/bryan/images/2013/ArrestedDevelopmentForBritishEyesOnlyCallMe4.png



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: robtain on Jan 21, '13 09:35:01AM

My wireless provider here in Canada, Bell, actually suggests the inclusion of the '+' when storing numbers. For example, a number in NYC might be stored as:

+1-212-555-1212

Ensuring that the '+' and the country code for NA (1) are there means I never get delayed by warnings about long distance calls, and I can be sure that I can dial all numbers from virtually any country that I travel to.



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: mountainbiker on Jan 21, '13 12:28:17PM

I enter all my contacts into Contacts with their appropriate country code (and drop the leading zero), e.g., USA 717-555-1212 becomes +1 717-792-1866, a landline in London that is 020 1234 456789 becomes +44 20 1234 456789, a mobile in UK is +44 7812 345678, a landline in Germany +49 6123 4567890, etc.



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: f00b4r on Jan 21, '13 12:30:45PM

FWIW when using the normal keyboard on an iOS device, holding one of the letter keys down will give you access to the special characters associated with it.



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: Jools912 on Jan 21, '13 02:46:23PM

Storing phone numbers (especially mobile numbers) in international format using the + prefix has been standard and recommended throughout Europe for as long as there has been GSM mobile phones.

For people who travel from country to country, it means they don't have to edit phone numbers before dialling either locally or to another country.

All the mobile numbers, and any numbers I dial whilst travelling are all stored in this way.



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: michelle_eris on Jan 21, '13 03:54:46PM

Holding the # key will produce a semicolon, and holding the * key will produce a comma.



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Press the + key on the Phone app number pad
Authored by: lairdo on Jan 21, '13 08:20:19PM

Yes, + is generally considered the symbol for the international dialing prefix. So, in the US, it represents 011. In most other countries, it's 00. When the iPhone passes that along to the carrier, the carrier knows to substitute it.

Also, the carrier is smart enough to ignore it for calls to the same country. It is a little less obvious in the US, Canada and few countries that use 1 as their country code and also as their in country long distance code. But in the UK, for example, dialing +44 xxxxxxxx is the same as dialing 0xxxxxxxx (as the UK uses a leading 0 to dial within country). When I lived in the UK, the Vodafone rep told me to store all my numbers with the + designation, and I have used that format for 10 years.



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