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10.7: View Linux SMB servers in Path Finder UNIX
I use Path Finder for some fancier features, but since upgrading to Lion, I could not see my Linux SMB server in the side panel. After waiting for their Lion patch with no change, I figured out a very simple solution.

For whatever reason, Path Finder can't find or list Samba servers like it did in Snow Leopard. But, if you either install or modify an Avahi daemon on the SMB server, and advertize SMB services, Path Finder will see the server again.

After installing the Avahi daemon in a manner appropriate for your distribution, just create and save this simple file to /etc/avahi/services (on the server):
<?xml version="1.0" standalone='no'?>
<!DOCTYPE service-group SYSTEM "avahi-service.dtd">

   Samba Shares on %h
   
       _smb._tcp
       139
This worked as is for me, and the server popped up in Path Finder within seconds, and remains in the side panel even after all the shared mounts were removed.

Hope this helps someone else who is sick of opening a Finder window just to connect to another share, or is sick of hitting Command-K every few minutes.

[crarko adds: I haven't tested this one. I'd guess this is because Lion no longer uses Samba for SMB support. Note: there was originally a link in the hint to a Gentoo Linux wiki as a source for this fix, but that site seems to have crashed. Avahi is a multicast DNS zeroconf (Bonjour-compatible) service discovery system. As the hint suggests, you should be able to find it for most Linux distributions.]
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10.7: View Linux SMB servers in Path Finder
Authored by: blinkintosser on Sep 26, '11 09:13:52PM
You can probably announce the Linux SMB services from the Mac itself using OS Xs built-in dns-sd to advertise it. Under Snow Leopard, which I still use, I have a few slapped-together LaunchAgents to announce the availability of remote Windows SMB servers that are on the far side of routers VPNs mostly where broadcasts cant cross, causing them to show up in the garbage bar on the left side of (at least regular, if not also Path-) Finder windows like local servers would. Here is one that I have modified slightly to redact private info:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
<plist version="1.0">
  <dict>
    <key>Disabled</key>
      <false/>
    <key>Label</key>
      <string>org.mydomain.ssh.smb_server.domain_announce</string>
    <key>KeepAlive</key>
      <true/>
    <key>ProgramArguments</key>
      <array>
        <string>/usr/bin/dns-sd</string>
        <string>-P</string>
        <string>server.domain</string>
        <string>_smb._tcp.</string>
        <string>.</string>
        <string>445</string>
        <string>192.168.249.65</string>
        <string>0.0.0.0</string>
      </array>
  </dict>
</plist>
SMB servers announced this way show a Mac icon instead of the blue-screen CRT, but it all works the same.

[ Reply to This | # ]
10.7: View Linux SMB servers in Path Finder
Authored by: dfoss on Sep 27, '11 05:24:11AM

The files for ahahi-daemon require properly formatted XML, which this wasn't. See http://tob.io/post/8383529336/fix-avahi-samba-with-os-x-lion for the full text of what this file should look like.

Note that when copying text off of the page, the line numbers mess things up, so paste it into text editor, strip off the line numbers, then save it to your linux box.



[ Reply to This | # ]
SMB...
Authored by: jethro1138 on Sep 27, '11 06:42:58AM

I do have to point out that if you have a Linux machine and you're sharing large volumes of information with your Mac, you should switch to NFS. It is CONSIDERABLY faster than SMB.



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