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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard System 10.6
Snow Leopard only hintThis hint is the result of an experience I tried in the last few days. It involves disabling the dynamic pager daemon and stop using virtual memory at all in Snow Leopard. I don't recommend doing it in previous OSX versions, or if don't want to take risks. Advantages, in my case, are obvious, and, so far, with no issues at all.

My MacBook Pro, Core i5, 4 GB RAM, 320 GB HD, has been a real pleasure to use; my previous machine was an old PowerBook G4, as slow as you can imagine. But even with the MBP, some slowness seems to sometimes appear in everyday usage (Parallels 6/Windows7, Firefox, Photoshop, Mail, iTunes always opened), specifically related to the disk activity (a 5400 RPM 320 GB, Hitachi drive). I suspected the paging activities of OSX to be responsible for the general system slowdown. If so, no doubt the disk drive is the weak side of the MBP 2010, as everything slows down when OSX is creating a new swap file. So one move I planned was to buy a 7200 RPM drive, or even better, an SSD drive.

Meanwhile, I've been trying to minimize disk swap activity. Last week, I discovered this page at OSXDaily.com, where virtual memory is shown to be easy to disable in Snow Leopard. To disable it, the solution is quite simple. In Terminal, type this line and restart:
sudo launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.dynamic_pager.plist
To re-enable it, just repeat above command with the 'load' option.

The difference for me was quite impressive and immediately perceptible. As soon as I disabled the dynamic pager daemon, I restarted and notice a huge difference on how fast any application opens, that Windows 7 (in Parallels) reacts almost natively, and how the whole system now feels so much more responsive. I would estimate the difference is about 20-30% between enabling and disabling VM. Win7 launches in about 20 secs, even Firefox opens and responds much faster than before.

No swap files in Private/var/vm, 0% cache hits and about 800-900 MB RAM still free (3 GB used) during peak usage.

I can testify that, after a week of tests, having opened as much as 30 simultaneous applications (in fact all the Apps folder), I have notice no slowdown, no bug, no kernel panics, no unusual log file error reporting. I tried running some PC game demos in Parallels/Win7 (with 2 GB RAM allocated). There was still no panic, no issues. I was working at my academy this week, using Windows servers, online printers, and virtual private networks, with no issues at all. The MBP is okay, except faster than before (and even faster when waking from sleep).

So, if you have OSX 10.6 with as least 4 GB RAM, disable your virtual memory and rediscover your Mac.

[crarko adds: I haven't tested this one. I will echo Rob's advice from this previous hint; I do not recommend disabling the virtual memory subsystem on any version of Mac OS X. However, if you have sufficient physical RAM and want to eke out that last little bit of extra speed, you can try this at your own risk.]
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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: lsequeir on Jun 08, '11 07:58:42AM

I had never considered that this might be possible.

Using Windows 7 under Parallels with only 4GB of real memory was painfully slow in my MacBook Pro - but it ceased to be a problem whem I maxed out the ram at 8GB. Adding RAM is in my mind be the safest way to counter the slowness of swapping virtual memory around; but one of these days, when I feel bold, I may just try and see how much faster my mac will be with virtual memory turned off.

---
LuĂ­s



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: beanzos on Jun 08, '11 08:10:22AM

Just did this on an iMac (3.06 core 2 duo with 8gb ram). Apps are launching faster right away and haven't noticed any problems at all.

I launched VMware Fusion running XP and 3 browsers open, photoshop and illustrator on the mac side with documents open(not huge ones though), and 3 safari windows including one with a flash movie. This is my typical load at work on this machine also. Illustrator opened a file a lot faster than normal and the windows browsers are a bit faster to load then normal. Activity monitor is still showing just over 4gb of ram free.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: cyberspread on Jun 08, '11 08:31:34AM

How can we tell if this worked? I ran the terminal commands>Restarted>Opened Activity Monitor>Chose the System Memory Tab>VM Size: around 190.55GB… Shouldn’t this be 0?



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: Superboy on Jun 08, '11 08:37:46AM

This is quite a 'dangerous' hint, in regards to system stability.

If the system needs to increase the "wired" memory, and runs out of active, free and inactive memory, it WILL crash. Normally the "wired" memory is quite small, it holds things things like the contents of a text document, the current page in Safari and so on. It's data that can't be re-loaded from disk. Active and inactive memory can be re-created from the files on disk (temporary store for the UI images, etc), so the system can purge the active and inactive pages, and reload from disk later.

This is all find and dandy, until you start a virtual machine. Virtual machines are very foreign to the UNIX system, and so it can't intelligently read the virtual machine's RAM and decide what can be purged. So, it makes all the virtual machine's RAM non-purgable wired memory instead. This means that all of a sudden, the virtual machine's RAM has been mapped into wired memory, hugely increasing the size of this non-purgeable RAM type. Consequently, it means the system now has significantly less memory it can purge when the wired RAM size needs to grow further. If the system runs out of wired or active memory, it'll just purge old parts of the inactive and active types of memory to make space. If the system has no inactive or active memory left to purge and it requires more wired memory, it will crash. The system will lock up, and a hard reset will be the only option.

I disabled virtual memory on my 2006 Mac Pro when I got a SSD, but it's got 8gb RAM so has plenty to play with. I wouldn't recommend disabling virtual memory with less than 6gb, as the system can quite easily swallow up 4gb of wired memory, especially with Photoshop and Win7 in a virtual machine. If you've only got 4gb, and the system uses it all for wired memory, it'll lock up. I keep an eye on the memory usage (with iStat menus) so this doesn't happen.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: prijker on Jun 08, '11 11:27:46AM

I agree it's dangerous and at the begining I was expecting for some kernel panic as soon as all memory would be filled.
In fact, it's now almost 2 weeks, and still no KPs and the like, even when the 4Gb RAM limit is close.
Will keep swap file definitively off, but may be I'll go for 8 GB RAM soon.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: Superboy on Jun 08, '11 11:33:12AM

I have had one or two complete lockups since I turned VM off about a year ago, which I attributed to the system running out of RAM. No kernel panic, just a complete freeze when I had lots going on. It does speed things up significantly though, and as long as you don't go overboard on the number of apps running, you should be fine :)



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: beanzos on Jun 08, '11 12:06:00PM

I had to turn it back on. was wasting too much time tracking memory usage which started interrupting real work that needed to be done. As a web developer, I keep at least 3 browsers open, many many tabs, Fusion, etc. It just piled up real quick and began slowing down eventually. The speed increase was not worth the time loss in the end.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: cody121 on Jun 08, '11 08:53:06AM

I was having a real speed problem with memory and parallels, specifically, when you exit a specific parallels VM, the memory is marked "inactive" and not "free". And each different virtual machine that was opened, consumed it's own individual chunk of memory that stays inactive after close. So the more virtual machines that you open and close, the more inactive memory you will have. It adds up very quickly.

As soon as the system was out of "free" memory, EVERYTHING ran like dog crap. I dont care what everyone says about "free" being the same as inactive, it is NOT the same. I "think" that when you are out of free memory, and open something new, the inactive memory is then paged. Not real sure.

My solution was to monitor my memory in activity monitor, and when I was out of green/free, I would open up terminal, and run 'purge'. (installed with developer tools). It is not ideal, use at your own risk, but I hate rebooting, so it worked for me very well.

I know this is only half related to the post, but i am mentioning because if you are going to investigate turning off paging, you should know about inactive memory and purge as well.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: robreale on Jun 08, '11 10:32:24AM

Wait one cotton pickin' minute, this may be a tip that really turns out to be the best tip I could have ever had!!

I built an OSX machine with 8GB of RAM. Do you know that no matter what I run, I can never get the ram used to go above 6200mb or so? I'm using Menu Meters.

So I have 3 copies of Chrome open, Safari, Transmission, Skype, MailPlaine, Preview, Word, Excel and Parallels Windows 7 32 Bit...... and I never can get above 6.2gb of RAM and the system will just crawl after that... it will spin the wheel at me with 1800mb of ram free, and it's pissing me the heck off! The one issue I have with too many programs open is Java in Chrome. It will become unresponsive.

Maybe, just maybe I'll use more RAM! Normally I don't get above the high 3000's without Parallels running... as I write this email I'm creeping up, and at 4852mb RAM used.

Good Lord! Why isn't OSX ever hitting 6.xxgb of RAM used!?!?!?



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: gmachen on Jun 08, '11 11:23:49AM
metiure, please come back and say why you recommend against doing this in earlier versions. I just checked, and my Leopard 10.5.8 also has:
/System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.dynamic_pager.plist
Has something compelling changed in Snow Leopard?

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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: metiure on Jun 09, '11 03:13:59AM

AFAIK, disabling system daemons in Leopard in different, as they are launched differently from Snow Leopard. Sorry if I can't be more specific.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: OneCatFamily on Jun 08, '11 02:17:53PM

I've noted that after about three hours of work on my 2006 MBP with only 2Gb of RAM, swap has been reactivated, so I gather the system kind of protects itself against a potential shortage of memory by reinstating virtual memory after a while. That, or putting your Mac to sleep reactivates VM somehow... I did that, but I don't know if VM came back after my MBP woke up, or if it was already back before it even went to sleep...



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: kaih on Jun 08, '11 02:56:47PM

Having virtual memory on actually causes your OS to use less physical RAM.
With the dynamic pager active, if a program needs to load some code at some later time, it can nominate memory pages to load, but leave them on the disk and not actually load them.
If this memory gets used, then the dynamic pager automatically loads the code from the disk.

If you disable the dynamic pager, then the OS can't perform these tricks, so all code needs to be loaded into physical RAM, taking up more RAM.

Also, as other posters have mentioned, with a modern OS, you should never see an "Out of Memory" error - it can page some more. As a result most software doesn't do proper sanity checking in low memory situations - if you run out of physical RAM with the pager turned off, you will crash.

---
k:.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: aubreyapple on Jun 08, '11 08:13:32PM

Many of the comments about how dangerous it is to disable virtual memory suggest that it is impossible to run out of memory with VM on. This is certainly untrue as the real memory + swap can also run out depending on how much space you have on your disk. So, while it is less likely to crash due to running out of memory, it is FAR from impossible. If one can monitor carefully his usage and keep it well under the amount of real memory, this hint is very rational. If you do not wish to do that monitoring, then you should not disable VM (as other commenters suggest as well). The comments about a minimum of 6G is probably about right, but YMMV.

What DOES surprise me is that the system is faster when you do this. If the system is swapping when there is plenty of real memory it seems like there is a serious kernel bug. In my experience with linux this does not seem to be an issue... in fact we usually keep very little swap space because we do not really ever want to spill over into swap anyway. Note that on the old Solaris systems, you needed at least as much swap as real memory or you could not use the real memory. That was a real bummer but long since fixed in modern linux look alikes such as MacOS.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: patpro on Jun 09, '11 12:35:41AM

I've used this hint on my Mac Pro (12 GB RAM), and I see absolutely no speed gain. Running a large windows VM, re-computing some Bridge CS3 thumbnail, and other intensive task was as fast as usual.
That would be nice to provide a way to actually benchmark the effect of disabling dynamic_pager on Mac OS X.

---
http://www.patpro.net/



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: dr3do on Jun 09, '11 01:24:22AM

Well on several of my systems (servers and also clients) I see a huge difference using this tweak…

With activated "vm-swap" it looks like this:
http://cl.ly/3y0G0B1r2o1n0B2y2D41

With deativated "vm-swap" it looks like this:
http://cl.ly/1S3o0x0J1j3b3t1b141C

I already use very fast system, but even on a dual SSD system Safari used a lot of jumps in the dock - OK, compared to HD it's like no jump ;) - while starting up. Also Office 2011 took some jumps. But with this tweak they cant finish the first... peng open.

And yes, like some mentioned before. Memory management of OS X (a least 10.6) has a huge kernel bug and do not work very efficient. And also yes, inactive memory != free memory - at lest under OS X.

That's my experience, which hopefully HTH someone.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: patpro on Jun 11, '11 01:01:45AM

I'm a bit skeptical about the measurement of memory when pager is disabled. I fact I don't understand the result: why is active memory stays low when I'm running big software?

Take a look at these graphs:

http://patpro.net/~patpro/pager_memory_all-day.png
http://patpro.net/~patpro/pager_memory_all-week.png

First one shows memory usage for a day, after pager has been deactivated, on a Mac Pro, 12 GB RAM. The spikes of memory consumption are due to Left 4 Dead 2 (around Fri 8:00, Fri 23:00). Active memory stays about the same value.

Second one shows memory usage for a week: from 3rd to 8th of June, pager is active, after, pager is deactivated. Before deactivation, you can see the effect of playing Left 4 Dead 2 (every memory spikes). It clearly shows that playing L4D2 increases active memory usage by approximatively 2 GB when pager is active, and by nothing when pager is inactive. Note that on the 8th of June, uptime of the system was around 50 days, so active memory being so high is ok.

---
http://www.patpro.net/


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Sudo Permission
Authored by: halodos on Jun 08, '11 09:09:07PM

Hello,

I have a quick question. I am trying this, but sudo keeps asking me for a password, which I cannot figure out. After I go to /etc/ and getinfo on sudoers to give myself permission to edit it, it gives me a sudo is 0640 instead of 0440 error. I assume this is because of the extra privileges on sudo. Do you know how to get that sudo password easily, or how did you bypass it?

Thanks!



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Sudo Permission
Authored by: everkleer80 on Jun 09, '11 08:03:16AM

AFAIK the password should be the pw for the user you are currently logged in as (I think you have to be using an admin account.)



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Sudo Permission
Authored by: halodos on Jun 09, '11 08:24:02AM

Thanks for the fast response!

I tried that several times, and was only able to pull it off today. I may have typed my pw too quickly or something...

Now I get the error:

launchctl: Error unloading: com.apple.dynamic_pager

Does this mean that I am already using it so it doesn't unload, and if so, then I probably shouldn't use this hint, right? Thanks for the help guys! Didn't think it would be this complicated T_T



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Sudo Permission
Authored by: everkleer80 on Jun 10, '11 09:52:36AM

Hmm.. I had inadvertantly run the unload command twice and I think I got that error the second time (since it wasn't loaded anymore.) Maybe the command previously ran successfully and you didn't notice? If you run the same command replacing "unload" with "load" then it will either load it or say "already loaded," so you could try loading it and then unloading it again.

I don't think you should get an error due to it being "in use," but if that is the case then just try right after a restart (asuming you don't have a ton of stuff starting at login/startup.)



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: tsugaru on Jun 08, '11 09:25:12PM

I'm gonna have to try this on my new iMac. 16GB of RAM. I'm sure it's not going to run out.

Awesome tip. I'll see how this works.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: jakubgg on Jun 09, '11 01:15:28PM

Shweeet!!

Just applied that tweak - and for the last three hours haven't seen spinning beach ball even once! Still got 2GB free mem and everything works like a breeze.

I guess that users on MacBooks (pro/iMacs) will see a huge difference because of their default 5600rpm drives - that are not the fastest bunch. Mac Pros or those with 7200rpm might not see that much difference.
Right now it feels more like working o a Mac with SSD drive.
I've got 8GB of memory but I have put Activity Monitor in a dock to show my memory usage - and it is not that bad. After three hours of web surfing, film watching and photoshopping (photoshop has separate VM) still around 2-3GB free.
But seriously I have almost forgot how the spinning beach ball looks like :)

Will keep posting in case of unusual behaviour.

Cheerio.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: jakubgg on Jun 14, '11 02:45:09PM

OK Update.
So running Snow Leopard on MacBook Pro with 8GB mem, (Web development, Netbeans, Photoshop, VLC, iTunes etc.) Max mem usage was around 6GB.
After 5 days I have managed to kill the system trying to convert some mp3 to Wav's in MAX. No kernel panics, no complaints, just system freeze.

So beware if you intend to convert large files in MAX - it can kill your system if you do not have VM turned on (some weird memory management goes on there - from 1GB to 8GB + 3GB of swap file in 1 second).

Beside that one hiccup everything was just peachy - even opening three 150mb files in TextWrangler was absolutely fine.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: Pencilman on Jun 10, '11 11:12:22AM

Running Macbook pro 2011 i7 2.2 GHz, 8GB RAM with 750 GB 5400 rpm drive. OSX 10.6.7
Been disappointed with slow downs and beach balling, regretted not getting SSD.

With this hint, launching apps and running iphoto noticeably faster.
Previously Word was taking too long too load, so much so I turned off Word Document Gallery at startup. Now the Gallery comes up more than quick enough, so I can leave it on.
No longer missing SSD as much.
Haven't had any probs running almost every app I have concurrently.

On activity monitor, seems to free RAM faster rather than holding it inactive.
I wouldn't say that it's disabled VM entirely, since I still have a 144 GB VM on activity monitor, but whatever it's done, it's working great on my system.
Thanks for the turbocharging tip !!



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: broomburgo on Jun 11, '11 03:28:58AM

I think this trick could work if you are lucky enough.

I did it: yesterday I disabled the virtual memory and checked the memory usage in real time with menumeters during an afternoon of work with xcode in iOS programming.

The wired memory kept to fill up the total memory available (8GB), and I didn't notice any speed bump, but I have an SSD, so I'm not sure, because memory swapping with an SSD could be fast enough to make the system sufficiently snappy on its own.

After some hours (3 or 4) the memory was completely full, and the system didn't crash: it simply stopped to work, I couldn't do anything, no kernel panic but the macbook pro was freezed. Actually I was expecting that (but I love to make experiments), so I shut off the macbook pro pressing the button for two seconds, and then I rebooted. Nothing happened right after that, but this morning OSX did some silly things, like resetting the system date to 2001, and asking for network permissions for all the system level services. Also, mail asked me again for all the account and passwords.

I don't know exactly what happened, but I suggest to NOT disable the virtual memory.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: sfgecko on Jun 11, '11 11:21:16AM

i tried this hint on a 2006 macbook pro with 3GB RAM (4GB installed, but only 3GB addressable on this model) with 10.6.7 and 5400rpm hdd. i applied the terminal command and rebooted. then i loaded a bunch of apps to use up all available RAM.

here's a screenshot of activity monitor:
http://i.imgur.com/pf2nu.jpg

i noticed everytime it got to 2.99GB used, i was still able to open apps. however, the hard drive was doing some major read/writing (i assume to compensate for the lack of RAM).

although it never kernel panicked and i don't recall it beachballing, the system did become unresponsive because the hard drive was super busy. while swap files were not created in /var/vm, there is some furious hard drive activity when you go beyond the physical ram allotment. i'd be curious to hear an explanation if anyone knows what is happening.

in conclusion, i think this hint is useful and i will continue to use it. will report back if i notice any irregularities with system performance.

Edited on Jun 11, '11 11:29:56AM by sfgecko



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: robh on Jun 18, '11 12:11:45AM

I've tried this hint over the last week on a top spec current iMac with 16gb of ram. I didn't notice any improvements.

A few minutes ago I ran out of memory launching Aperture. I've now disabled this hint and gone back to the default.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: raxremedy on Jun 24, '11 06:27:09AM

Let me share my experience.

I have disabled virtual memory on my macbook pro ( 2GB ram) for almost 8 months.
The applications loads fast on my day-to-day use, as compared to when the virtual memory is enabled.
The only problem I experienced was, the system freezes (but this rarely happens).
I guess it freezes when the memory is maxed out.

The very reason I disabled virtual memory is, I want to minimize disk access when using multiple applications like:
Itunes, photoshop, apache, mysql,php, transmit, ichat, mail, textwrangler, coda, and others.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: armandkarels on Aug 04, '11 06:07:58AM

This article has really helped me to find a solution to this constant problem of virtual memory. I appreciate you.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: leeiscoolcoins on Aug 05, '11 10:16:15AM

Has anyone tried this with Lion? I'm tempted but not sure if it's worth the risk since I upgraded.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: Dragon76 on Aug 09, '11 09:16:53PM

I did but I don't think it works as Activity Monitor stills shows apps using virtual memory, although my /private/var/vm folder just has the sleep image in it.

Lion does things differently as Apple prepares to eliminate virtual memory through app state freezing and I have not dug around in launchd's logs to see if it continues to load vm.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: leeiscoolcoins on Oct 03, '11 02:10:32PM

DO NOT DO THIS IN LION

Ok so I attempted to continue with disabled SWAP in Lion and for a few months, it went ok. I noticed things slowing down recently and then a day ago I started getting total freezes about 15-30 minutes after booting up. I couldn't figure out what was wrong until I decided to re-enable Swap. It fixed all my issues and my mac is way faster once more. Please learn from my 3 month trial and error. Happy Computing!



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard (Lion in this case)
Authored by: Michelasso on Aug 06, '11 03:52:32AM

Ok, I have tried this hint in OS X Lion. I disabled the VM. After leaving the MB (3GB RAM) on overnight, surfing a couple of hours today I decided to re-enable it again. Well, it freed 300MB of RAM. Not sure were it took it from. Safari's processes have the same size and OS X created swap area of 50MB.

I tried this hint because in some HW OX Lion with Safari 5.1 fills large swap areas (1-3GB) even having plenty of inactive memory (>1GB out of 3GB total RAM in my case). I really would like to understand how virtual memory works in Lion because to me this doesn't make sense at all.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: paczor on Oct 12, '11 01:03:50PM

I've tried it for 3 months on Macbook Pro 2.16GHz Intel Core 2 Duo with 4GB RAM (only 3GB visible for system) and OSX 10.6.8.
It's quite save and converted my Mac into the very fast machine.
But...
there's one disadvantage: a human will become a memory manager. ;-)
That's it!
If you use memory hungry apps like Photoshop you should reconfigure them to not eat all memory,
if you open many tabs in Chrome or Firefox they could eat up a lot of memory,
if you have a thousands of messages in your Mail.app it also could eat too much,
etc.
Sometimes having opened Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Terminal, Chrome and MAMP is way too much and then you have to cold reboot.
But I'm still happy with that trick.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: rrodriguezNT on Feb 23, '12 06:50:13AM

Hi everybody!

After a couple of years "suffering" high disk access rates on my "impressive" Mac Pro running 10.6.8 / 8Gb RAM, this solution seems magical! I've applied it less than one hour ago, so I've not a clear idea yet about what kind of problems could arise in the near future! But the "usability" of this box has improved a lot. I've now the feeling of being working with a really fast computer. This feeling had been talked away during these last two years because of bad movement of windows, cursor stopped here and there... in general, a behavior I'd never associated with a Mac, and much less of these characteristics.

I'll be back here with any problem it could arise in the future. I guess an update to Lion could also be of great usefulness, but I'm quite happy with my plain old 10.6.8. The only problem "was", I hope, this intensive disk read/write activity. I'll also keep looking for another solution to avoid disabling any system component.

Thanks!

Ricardo



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: idontwanttoregis on Jul 01, '12 10:56:34AM

I would highly recommend NOT doing this if you use highly ram hungry applications such as Motion.

I have 16gb of ram and during a render, motion used up all my Free and Inactive RAM, which completely locked up the system with beachballs and required a hard power down. I re enabled paging and everything is fine now.



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard -- follow up
Authored by: petersconsult on Jul 04, '12 01:22:09AM

Well, it seems like everyone's getting wildly different results with this...
For my part, i've tried it on two different unibody MacBook Pro's (both running 10.6.8 and 8GB RAM) for and extended period of time, and got *exactly* the same results:
Nothing...
It makes no difference whatsoever whether VM is on or not.
No performance increase or decrease, in any regard.
No stability impact whatsoever. In fact, it baffles me that the system still manages to page out when VM is off (and, believe me, i quadruple-checked to make sure it was).
So, after several months of running these machines with VM off, i've decided to turn it back on, and... ...well... ...Nothing -- all the same, all the time.

I have to say that i expected *something* to happen...

Hope this helps,
Peter



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10.6: Completely Disable Virtual Memory in Snow Leopard
Authored by: petersconsult on Dec 03, '12 08:22:39AM

Pre-Scriptum:
i *do* realize that i'm the only one here interested in following-up on this post...

But i must warn you that disabling Virtual Memory in Mountain Lion (10.8.x) comes with *huge* performance penalties...

Indeed, i finally updated to Mountain Lion this week and was appalled at the lags in nearly every task performed by the OS..
Then i remembered (when looking through the Cocktail tweaks) that i had disabled VM and, evidently, Mountain Lion had not turned it back on.
So i turned it back on, and the system was instantly (well, after a restart anyway...) snappier...

i Hope this helps...
Peter



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