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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices OS X Server
Follow these steps to work around an issue that causes recurring password dialogs on iOS devices that are configured to connect to a CalDAV account hosted by Mac OS X Server 10.6.

The procedure involves turning off Digest authentication and enabling Basic authentication. Since all passwords will be sent in the clear, make sure that all traffic to the iCal server is encrypted. This can be done either by requiring users to connect via VPN or by using a valid SSL certificate and setting SSL to 'Redirect' in the iCal Service settings in Server Admin.
  • Log in to an administrative user's account on the server and open the Terminal application located in /Applications/Utilities/.
  • Type the following command to change to the directory containing the settings for the iCal service:
    cd /private/etc/caldavd
  • Make a copy of the preference file. You will be asked for the administrative user's password after entering this line:
    sudo caldavd.plist caldavd.plist.backup
  • Use the nano editor to edit the preference file:
    sudo nano caldavd.plist
  • You can use the arrow keys to navigate around the contents of the preference file. First, enable Basic authentication. Go past the line that reads <key>Authentication</key>, past <key>Basic</key>, stop at <key>Enabled</key> and change <false/> to <true/> on the next line.
  • Turn off Digest authentication by going past <key>Digest</key> and stop at <key>Enabled</key> and change <false/> to <true/> on the next line.
  • Press Ctrl+X to exit the editor, press Y to save changes, and press the Enter key to confirm the file name.
  • In Server Admin, stop the iCal service and start it again.
If you need to revert your changes. Issue the following command in the Terminal application:
sudo mv /private/etc/caldavd/caldavd.plist.backup /private/etc/caldavd/caldavd.plist

[crarko adds: I haven't tested this one.]
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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices | 6 comments | Create New Account
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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices
Authored by: poenn on May 26, '11 09:31:00AM

Nice! I’d love to see more OS X Server based hints like this one.



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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices
Authored by: adrian.nier on May 26, '11 01:59:09PM

Unfortunately there’s an error in this hint. The third to last step that involves turning off Digest authentication should say <true/> to <false/>. Not the other way ’round. There are downsides to copy/paste, I guess.



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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices
Authored by: jcbeckman on May 26, '11 02:48:06PM

Step 3 also has a problem.

sudo caldavd.plist caldavd.plist.backup

should be

sudo cp caldavd.plist caldavd.plist.backup



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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices
Authored by: jaydisc on May 26, '11 03:55:30PM

A few typos, but if this works, this a HUGE hint.



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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices
Authored by: KiwiGraham on May 26, '11 06:50:04PM

I think this hint either ties in with, or comes from, an Apple Discussions thread which has a lot of posts and from my reading indicates that your results may vary....
https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2613260



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10.6 Server: Workaround for recurring CalDAV password dialogs on iOS devices
Authored by: PeterMoller on May 30, '11 06:45:37AM

First: you should never run as admin, period. Admin-work can easily be accomplished with being root in a terminal window (su adminuser; sudo -i). I run as this since 10.5 came out -- in 10.4 it was a serious pain not to be admin.

Second: yes, you can easily run “softwareupdate -i -a” on the command line every now and then. The problem with the users at my department is that most of them don't do that even though they know they should. My script informs them and then they can choose to run “softwareupdate”.

Third: I have to admit I didn't find kapputtendorfs neat little information before I wrote SoftwareUpdateCheck, but having seen it now, I think my script is less “in the way”. Having growlnotify is real neat (and I do that for my users to inform them when the backup has run) but my script is a bit more quiet and also has a feature that I don't think kapputtendorf have: a negative report. That means that with SoftwareUpdateCheck you know that the script that is checking for updates is running and it has, or has not, found any updates.

And lastly: it was fun writing it! :-)



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