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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive System
Before cloning your boot drive to another drive ... add that other drive to Spotlight's Privacy list. That saves a lot of CPU cycles during cloning.

In hindsight, this seems obvious, but it wasn't at the time.
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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive
Authored by: MacTripper on Jun 08, '09 09:37:16AM

It's also advised to Disk Utility>Erase with Zero option any new drive before over writing any potential bad sector with your data.

In fact, I zero every new drive I get right away. It greatly increases the reliability factor.

If your original drive is potentially infected with malware, disconnect from all networks, c boot from the OS X install disk (write protected) and use Disk Utility to Zero the original drive BEFORE connecting and option booting/reverse cloning back to the original drive.

It's advised to keep at least two clones, on separate drives, one recent and one timed back to the last OS X update.

Always clone a boot drive before any major OS X changes/tweaks, updates and/or application/driver installs.

There are OS X exploits in the wild. Turn off your Java in browsers.

Run as a user and not as a admin by creating another admin, logging into it and turning your original admin into a user.

I don't advise TimeMachine except for novice users who depend upon others to fix their computer problems. It's not boot able, so it's limited in its ability to help you fix things yourself in time of trouble.



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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive
Authored by: jiclark on Jun 08, '09 01:06:03PM

I've seen several claims recently about zeroing a drive (even a brand-new one) to increase reliability. I think many would dispute the claim when talking about a new drive...

Anyone else care to elaborate?



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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive
Authored by: wallybear on Jun 08, '09 01:53:14PM

While zeroing a brand new drive can be wise enough to pinpoint bad sectors (it can happen, also on new drives; btw a surface scan can be more effective, if you own some utility that can do that), the other recommendations (original drive infected with malware, disconnect from networks, keep a timed back clone, clone a boot drive before OS X changes/tweaks/updates or application/driver installs, turn off Java in browsers) seem to me a little too paranoid or coming from a previously Windows user (no offense intended).

Currently we are not living in such a scary world of terror.

It's true that Time Machine cannot boot, but you can do needed recovery booting from your System DVD, it can use TM backups.
A good habit instead is to keep a small bootable partition (or even better another drive, if possible) in order to be able to boot from there in case of trouble. From there you can use repair utilities and your Time Machine backups more easily.



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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive
Authored by: TonyT on Jun 09, '09 07:37:08AM

>A good habit instead is to keep a small bootable partition (or even better
>another drive, if possible) in order to be able to boot from there in case of trouble.

Agreed. (I put my Leopard Install disks as a bootable partition on my Time Machine drive, so I can boot and restore from the drive)



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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive
Authored by: q3 on Jun 09, '09 05:11:29AM

Just a little paranoid, aren't you?

A good advice is OK but no need to scare people, is there...

Besides that your comment has little or nothing to do with the original hint postet here.
The tip regarding spotlight ist however quite interesting.



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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive
Authored by: TonyT on Jun 09, '09 07:32:50AM

"I don't advise TimeMachine except for novice users who depend upon others to fix their computer problems."

I don't advise only relying on a clone. If you're most recent clone is two days ago and you 'lost' files in the interim, you're out of luck if you only use a clone.

Use Time Machine AND clone regularly

Tony



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Reduce CPU workload while cloning boot drive
Authored by: Frederico on Jun 14, '09 11:40:34PM

What does any of this have to do with reducing CPU load when cloning???? Your zeroing of a disk just adds to CPU and actual time to perform this operation; why is there an assumption it is even on a new drive here??

Color me lost as to why you even bring this up for this hint; it seems pretty clear it's about making clone jobs go faster, not take up more time and be more complex to complete by adding (debatable) steps.

Also, Time Machine freakin' rocks. I've been using Macs since there were Macs, and a Certified Apple Consultant, to boot. Combine Time Machine with other backup strategies, and more often than not, Time Machine is your fastest, most reliable, and most current backup for lost data.

Yes, it's not bootable, but, if combined with targeted cloning of the System and related folders to the same drive, while at the same time excluding the very same System folders from Time Machine, you get a complete, up to the minute, *easily user-accessible* backup of your system and data without resorting to complex, multiple runs of Rsync-based utilities like SuperDuper and CCC.

Cheers

Rico



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