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Fix slow mobile user logins Network
A mobile user account can take forever to login if you are at a different location, but have an internet connection. To login a mobile account, OS X will first try to connect the Open Directory server. If you have a domain search list in your network preferences that lists your company's domain, this can cause long timeouts.

To fix this, remove the company's domain from the DNS search list, and ask your company's administrators if they can specify this as a DHCP parameter.
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Fix slow mobile user logins | 3 comments | Create New Account
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Fix slow mobile user logins
Authored by: jyu on Apr 10, '08 08:11:24AM

First of all, the Search Domains shouldn't be entered manually. It should always be provided by DHCP server -- centralized management and less headache.

Second, the internal (company) DNS server should provide a different domain than public. Say your company is 123 and the public domain name is 123.com. Your internal DNS domain should be 123corp.com or something different than 123.com. Your Mac server will be server.123corp.com.

Therefore, your laptop won't be able to resolve server.123corp.com when it's outside of the office and won't cause any delay at logon.



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Fix slow mobile user logins
Authored by: brett_x on Apr 10, '08 09:04:00AM

"Therefore, your laptop won't be able to resolve server.123corp.com when it's outside of the office and won't cause any delay at logon."

I think the hint is suggesting that this is the cause of delay... because it is trying to reach an unreachable address when the user logs in from outside the company.



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Fix slow mobile user logins
Authored by: mike666 on Apr 10, '08 01:10:49PM
I always set up internal domains without an extension so there's absolutely no possibility of conflict with external domains. Works perfectly fine to have your internal domain simply be company and is easy to set up - at least with OSX Server :).

As far as a conflict like the hinter is illustrating though, a better solution would be to get in the habit of creating locations for non-work sites - a Generic DHCP location without any directory bindings, domain prefs or DCHP specifics would speed things up quite a bit and is easy to switch to. Much easier than trying to get your rock-obstinate network admin to make any changes to his/her carefully crafted and delicately balanced server or router setup.

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