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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue System 10.5
When installing the the recent Safari 3.1 update, I had a 'heart-in-the-mouth' moment. I was viewing one of my other Macs using Leopard's Screen Sharing. With the remote Mac ready to install the update, I allowed Software Update to start the reboot process. By now, we've all seen how Leopard handles updates which install during a reboot: after the user has logged out, but before the reboot, the update installation is performed with a dialog showing the progress.

However, what I found out by accident when sharing the remote Mac's screen during this process was that the update pre-reboot progress dialog responds to the Command-Q key combination. In trying to close the Screen Sharing window, I accidentally sent my Command-Q to the update progress dialog, causing it to quit in mid-update. Installation of the Safari update was cut short and I was returned back to the login screen instead of seeing the Mac reboot.

Logging in (and even rebooting) confirmed that the update installation had been stopped early. In the case of the Safari update, many apps would crash on startup, with WebKit 'unresolved' errors showing in Console. In this instance, the system was still usable enough to copy across the Safari update package and reinstall it manually to fix things. However, hitting this problem during deeper updates -- such as a 10.5.x release -- could leave an unbootable system.

The upshot is, when the pre-reboot update progress window is showing, keep your fingers away from the Command and Q keys, and be particularly careful when performing the update within a Screen Sharing session.

[robg adds: I haven't tested this one, but if true, I hope that a future Apple update will block the use of Command-Q at this stage of an update (or at least provide a confirmation dialog and a safe recovery after a reboot).]
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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue | 14 comments | Create New Account
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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: pavao on Mar 25, '08 08:23:20AM
The hint submitter and anyone that confirms this bug should submit a bug report to Apple. That's the official way to make them aware of issues with their software.

Use http://www.apple.com/feedback/macosx.html (or http://www.apple.com/feedback/ for problems not related with Mac OS X). If you're a member of the Apple Developer Connection, using https://bugreport.apple.com/ is probably a better idea.

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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: displaced on Mar 25, '08 09:51:35AM

Absolutely -- and I've reported this via bugreport.apple.com.

Quite a nasty bug, assuming I didn't just catch an edge-case which revealed it. In general use you're not likely to trigger the bug... but it's definitely a risk during a Remote Desktop session.



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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: rmanke on Mar 25, '08 11:31:35AM

This is definitely an issue because I have mistakenly pressed command-q many times trying to quit the screen sharing app.

Personally, I would like to see command-q treated differently in screen sharing, so there is some sort of confirmation that you want to send it to the remote computer or something...



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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: 1macgeek on Mar 25, '08 11:41:11AM

Am I missing something here? The program is functioning *exactly* as programmed, yet the user is inputting the wrong command and it is to be considered a *bug*?

Wait about another 20 years and maybe we will have amazing Kreskin-like powers built into Macs so they will do what you meant, not what you typed.



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Breaking the OS is a feature!?
Authored by: kkL on Mar 25, '08 11:51:54AM

I bet you never ever had to use Undo, right? No application should have it, because that's just bending to error-prone humans.

Anyway, the command was "Quit", not "Abandon Update in Inconsistent State that Breaks the OS and Makes Apps Crash Randomly".



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Breaking the OS is a feature!?
Authored by: itistoday on Mar 25, '08 06:42:22PM

Thank you for that comment. Saved me the trouble. :-)



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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: conigs on Mar 25, '08 11:54:24AM

For something potentially system critical like the software update process, the user should not be able to interrupt the process. Finder does not (by default) have a "Quit Finder" command, neither should the Software Update pre-reboot process.



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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: rbsandkam on Mar 25, '08 01:12:43PM

I agree with the comments that this is not a bug.
When an ARD/screen sharing window is the main focus, the keyboard commands should go to that remote computer.

Having said that, I would simply ask for consistency.
Because if I command-shift-Q, then it does *not* invoke the log out command for the remote computer, it invokes it for your computer (at least it does with ARD).
If you are too quick to hit enter, then you will quickly find all of *your* applications quitting, including your ARD/screen sharing session.

So, why does command-Q go to the remote computer, while command-shift-Q does not?



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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: mm2270 on Mar 25, '08 02:53:57PM
I agree with you here, and have found myself in situations where I have accidentally logged out of my own account when trying to log out a remote systems account using ARD. But that isn't the issue here. Something like Software Update should never respond to the Command-Q action when it's in the middle of actually installing the update.

Take a look at good installers, and what you'll see is that buttons like "Cancel" become grayed out at a certain point in the install process, because the developer was smart enough to know that is the user hit cancel at that point, they would be left with incomplete software. Why should Software Update act any differently in this case?

For him, it was only Safari. What if it had been 10.5.3 that was interrupted in the middle of the install? You're saying OS X should just allow that to happen???

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Clarification
Authored by: displaced on Mar 25, '08 04:45:50PM
Just to clarify, since a couple of posters have questioned this:

I absolutely have no problem at all with Cmd+Q getting passed to the remote session. That is the intuitive behaviour when operating the remote system.

However, Cmd+Q – whether issued on a local machine or to a remote session – should absolutely not quit Software Update whilst it is installing updated files. Note how the 'installing' window (the one which appears when copying files during the reboot phase of the update) does not have a clickable red Close window widget. This suggests that the coder's intention (and, indeed the correct behaviour) is that it should not be possible to halt an update mid-install. Clearly this is a critical point where interruption can lead to a broken system. The issue here is that even though the UI indicates the process cannot be interrupted, the window still responds to Cmd+Q, upon receipt of which it does indeed quit mid-process.

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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: lstewart on Mar 26, '08 04:56:27AM

While I agree it's a bug that Apple's Software Update app responds to command-Q during an install, I don't think the problem extends to OS updates in Leopard, does it? Starting with Leopard, any update that requires the system to restart no longer runs in the regular Software Update mode, but instead requires you to quit everything first and pretty much appears to take over your computer during the update. I would be seriously surprised if this mode allowed you to command-Q, since there is no menu or Cancel button or anything available while the update is installing. Or maybe I'm remembering wrong?



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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: displaced on Mar 26, '08 06:08:09AM
It's exactly that mode which apparently takes over the screen which does respond to a Command+Q.

The updater quits immediately and returns to the login window (even on machines where auto-login is enabled and there's only one account).

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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: zifnab on Mar 27, '08 04:44:24AM

I have suffered from this issue as well.

To quit screen sharing without issue, I now use the Command+Tab app switcher,
this only works on the local machine and not across the screen share.
Once open I can keep Command held and press Q to quit Screen Sharing (or any other app).




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10.5: Be aware of a Software Update Command-Q issue
Authored by: bcometa on May 15, '08 10:56:52AM
consider this hint to gain full keyboard support with screen sharing/ard on your local network... basically, use Teleport in conjunction with screen sharing/ard and your keyboard acts as if connected directly. you can then use quicksilver, app switcher, force-quit, etc, all keyboard shortcuts - include apple+Q - on the remote computer just as you'd expect them to work. this may prevent something like accidently quitting software update in the future.
brian/corewerkz

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