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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup Install
I thought I'd share the details of how I successfully managed a "non-standard" installation of Boot Camp in 10.5. Basically, I wanted three partitions on my startup drive: System, Users and Windows. (I don't want a debate on the merits of partitioning; it works for me, and the one time I didn't do it, I lost a ton of stuff due to 10.1 weirdness).

So, Boot Camp Assistant will not allow this. Full credit for the workaround goes to AxL over at Apple Discussions. I just tweaked the original a bit, and included some additional details. Read on...

Assuming you're all backed up, and ready to wipe your disk, here's how to do this:
  1. Start up from the Leopard CD
  2. Don't go in to the Installer when it appears, instead launch Disk Utility from the menu bar.
  3. Set up your partition scheme, leaving the disk format as HFS+ (Journaled). You may need to resize the Disk Utility window, as I couldn't slide it to less than 50GB, but I only wanted 30GB for Windows. Windows will eventually reside on the last (bottom) partition, which I named BOOTCAMP, just in case that might be required voodoo later.
  4. Now go to the Erase tab, and erase your Windows partition, formatting this as MS-DOS/FAT32.
  5. You can now install Leopard, ideally on the first (top) partition, and set that up how you like.
  6. When you're ready to install Windows, simply insert your Windows Install disk, and reboot holding down "C" key.
  7. You should then start to see the slick old-school text of the Windows installer sliding down your lovely screen.
  8. Eventually, you will be prompted to select a disk; your Windows partition will helpfully be the only one with FAT32 written alongside it.
  9. The first time around, I chose to proceed without any further formatting of the partition, but the install crashed after a few minutes, and my machine restarted in Leopard.
  10. The second time around, I chose the Format as FAT32 (Quick) option, and it went peachily. (The glaring visual disparity between the Leopard install process and the XP one, seen in quick succession, is quite something).
  11. Eventually, you will see the rolling green hills of Windows, at which point insert your Leopard Install Disc, and "setup.exe" should auto-run to install your drivers.
That's it, you're almost done. I had problems connecting XP to my WEP-128bit network. This Apple Knowledge Base article, about using only 13-character passkeys across multiple platforms, solved that. And then it's just the small matter of 86 patches (as of now, 63MB) required to bring XP SP2 up-to-date.

[robg adds: I haven't tested this one.]
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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup | 23 comments | Create New Account
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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: vineetb on Nov 14, '07 08:52:11AM

So with this can I create 3 partitions for Leopard, Vista and Ubuntu?

---
rock on\\\'



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: hobohmuwe on Nov 14, '07 10:16:41AM

Very interesting, but at which point did you create the third partition ?

I repartitioned my disk (160GB on MBP) to allow Tiger (80GB) and Leopard (77GB) sit side by side, so the former Tiger partition was shrunk using Disk Utility from Leopard Install DVD and Leopard installed on the second partition. That works fine, provided you give the Tiger partition at least 30% free space. Than using Bootcamp 2.0 from within Leopard I wanted to split the second partition. However, Bootcamp stops at the second window saying "The startup disk must be formatted as a single Mac OS Extended (journaled) volume or already partitioned by BootCamp Assistant for installing windows".

I than built a third partition using Leopard Disk Utility, erased and formatted it FAT32 and tried to install windows on it. I had no problem with the FAT partition but Win did not want to boot from it. At some point in the installation process Win tries to reboot and than stalls with "Media failure" or something, no matter whether you press C or Alt or nothing upon reboot.

One difference I see is that I did not wipe my disk beforehand, but that will hardly make a crucial difference.

So, there is still the need for a hands-on procedure to get partitions for all wonderful worlds Tiger, Leopard, Linux AND EVEN Windows (the latter for your tax programs and mobile firmware updates), with the chance to drop Tiger later when everything is stable under Leopard. Anyone ??!



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: marineblue on Nov 14, '07 10:46:05AM

Hobo

I started from a clean disk, then partitioned x3, and erased the 3rd Partition, freshly formatting that partition as MS-DOS/FAT32, all within Disk Utility.

You can then install Windows without using Bootcamp at all, by following the rest of the steps.

hth



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: mike3k on Nov 14, '07 11:55:04AM
I did something similar (which I described here) to set up my system to triple boot Leopard, Tiger, and Windows. I started with Leopard occupying the entire drive, used Boot Camp to install Windows, and finally used Leopard's disk utility to resize the Leopard partition and create a new partition for Tiger. This works since Leopard's disk utility can non-destructively resize partitions.

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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: hobohmuwe on Nov 14, '07 12:19:06PM

Solved. Following a suggestion above I tried to install Windows on the third partition again, now formatting FAT32 (quick) A SECOND TIME from within the Win installation procedure. Flawless.
mike3D: I wanted to retain my Tiger installations untouched, but good to know there are several ways. People will love this.



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: isumeet on Dec 02, '07 01:11:53AM

Thanks mike3 for the comment.

I did as you suggested and it worked like a breeze on my macbook. on a machine already setup with MacOSX (10.5 - Leopard) - a> setup windows using bootcamp b> after windows setup completes resize mac partition using diskutil after that.

It is much simpler than modifying using command lines. I have 3 partitions now Mac-40GB, Windows Vista-40GB, and Data (Fat32)-70GB accessible from both which stores my files, music, etc.

Note that Vista takes some time to boot and unlike OSX it shows a blank screen during that time. But boy! Vista rocks on a Macbook.



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: isumeet on Dec 02, '07 01:18:16AM

One thing to add in step b> I resized mac partition by booting from the leopard OSX install CD and selecting Disk Utility from the menu bar. First resize the mac partition then add another partition of free space size. Bootcamp partition must not be touched.



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: cmac6126 on Nov 14, '07 08:31:22PM

Is there a limit to the number of partitions you can have?

I've always used successfully multiple partitions with my 8 prior Macs, but this is my first Intel Mac (MBP) and attempt at running Windoze on it.

I need 3 Mac and 3 Windoze for my work, but after installing 10.5 this way the first time XP would not see a partition to install to.
I then repartitioned using Disk Utility and moved the XP partition up the list one (to 3rd place) and was able to install XP. However the XP install will not see the other two FAT32 partitions (4th and 5th places).

I'm trying to setup a 10.5 'System', 'User' and 'Media' and a XP (FAT32) 'System', 'Data' and 'Oracle' for use primarily with VMWare Fusion so I can run my companies Windoze software.

Any suggestions?

Cheers



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: marineblue on Nov 15, '07 05:25:16AM

Hi

I'm not an expert on this aspect of things, but perhaps it's something to do with the way BIOS & EFI "interact" with each other?

If I was trying for your set up, my gut feeling would be to have Disk Utility create the 3 mac (HFS+) partitions and one big windows partition.

Then I'd either use the Windows installer to partition the windows volume (I think that's possible?) as required, prior to installation of Windows XP, or else use a windows-based utility to partition it after installation, although you may not wish to have some windows software performing low-level actions on your OS X volume...

hth



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Not Working For Me
Authored by: chedrcheez on Apr 28, '08 12:49:17PM

I tried installing Vista on my MacBook Pro. I ran through the usual Boot Camp assistant, then tried making partitions in Disk Utility per the original hint. After that Vista would not boot -- it couldn't find appropriate media to boot from. So I tried booting from the Vista DVD. I was able to boot from the DVD but I could not run the installation. "Can not install to this disk because it is partitioned in the GPT format."



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3 partitions - NTFS, FAT32 and HFS+ without reformatting! Possibly more...
Authored by: gabester on May 08, '08 08:46:44AM
I just accomplished this in a slightly similar way, but you won't need to reformat and reinstall OS X - although you will need to access the HD either via the Leopard Install DVD or another Mac in target disk mode:

1. Use boot camp to partition your drive. Set the size of this partition to equal the combined size of the partitions you want for Windows and your other partition.
2. In Disk Utility, select your BOOTCAMP partition, go to the erase tab, and reformat it as HFS+ (journaled) - as Disk Utility can only resize or split journaled HFS+ partitions.
3. In Disk Utility, select your drive, go to the partition tab, then select the partition you just erased and split it with the plus button. Be sure to size the last (lowest) partition to equal what you want for Windows.
4. Still on the partition drive tab, delete the "middle" partition (the partition that is not your intended OS X startup volume and not your intended Windows volume.)
5. In Disk Utility, select your intended Windows volume and erase it with a MS-DOS (FAT) volume format.
6. In Boot Camp you should now be able to continue installing Windows (i.e. it should think you again have a "normal" boot camp disk.)
7. When the Windows installer starts up it should only see the drive you intend to install Windows on. (I installed Windows XP but this should work for Vista as well.) Reformat this partition to NTFS if you desire, and install Windows.
8. Once your Windows install is complete, access your drive without booting an OS on it (i.e. boot from your OS X 10.5 Install DVD and/or use target disk mode with another Mac).
9. This is the tricky step - open Disk Utility and UNMOUNT (do not eject!) all the volumes on your intended disk. While Disk Utility seems willing to let you modify your free space partition, it was displayed out of order on top of the Mac OS X and Windows partitions which made me nervous - as did the warning "This disk appears to be partitioned for Boot Camp. Changing the partition map may make this disk unbootable using Windows." (Do keep Disk Utility open to unmount your hard disk after each of the next two steps.)
10. In terminal, use the command "gpt list disk{x}" where {x} should just be the disk number for the drive you want to view the partition table of - you can get this information out of Disk Utility. This command should list 3 active partitions; #1 is your 200MB EFI partition, #2 is your Mac OS X partition, and #3 is your Windows partition. There should be free space in 512 byte blocks between your Mac OS X and Windows partition equal to the size of your other intended partition deleted in step 4 above.
11. (Remember to unmount all the volumes of your intended disk again in Disk Utility before this step) In terminal, use the command "gpt add -b PARTITIONSTART -s SIZE -t hfs disk{x}" where PARTITIONSTART is the block address where your free space starts and SIZE is the block size of the free space as determined in step 10 - the free space starting after your Mac OS X partition and extending to your Windows partition. (NOTE: I added in Apple's preferred 128MB buffer on each size of this partition by adding that amount to PARTITIONSTART and subtracting 2*128MB in blocks from SIZE. (This buffer size number can be determined from the space between your EFI and Mac OS X partition.)
12. Use Disk Utility to reformat this new partition as desired - I made mine FAT32 to share files between OS X and Windows. It may appear "out of order" above your Mac OS X and Windows partitions in the partition tab until you reboot.

At this point I found that my Windows XP install would no longer boot continuously blue-screening - I took the lucky guess of figuring that the boot.ini file needed to be edited to reflect that the Windows boot partition was not now number 3 but number 4 in the partition table order. Counterintuitively, after step 11, the gpt index of the partition is still number 3 (your middle partition between OS X and Windows will actually have index id#4) but, apparently, XP just looks at the partitions in order in the MBR wrapper inside your GPT on your drive. To edit the boot.ini file on the Windows volume from OS X, I installed MacFuse and NTFS-3G and pico. I simply changed the 3's to 4's and saved the file. When I rebooted into windows this time it came up successfully, as did the FAT32 volume; since I'd updated my Boot Camp Drivers to 2.1 already it even sees the GPT partitioning of the drive correctly from Disk Management.

After testing this a bit (verifying these steps, seeing how many partitions I can create in what order and whether they can be bootable) I will write this up as a full hint. My goal is to be able to have at least 4 bootable partitions - preferably with 2 available for XP/Vista - which I think will work on this hint right now. Previously, I had luck with attaining this configuration by formatting my drive as MBR but the limitation there was that OS X will not install onto an MBR disk - I had to image clean installs onto their partitions from another (GPT-formatted) disk.

I would guess that the method outlined above could be used to make many more partitions, and as long as the partitions that you need to be able to boot windows are among the first 4 on the drive (you go crazy and delete the EFI partition at your own risk - when I had my drive MBR formatted I had deleted the EFI partition without apparent consequence to OS X updates from 10.4.6 to 10.4.11 and 10.5 to 10.5.2.)

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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: pbw on May 10, '08 07:55:51PM

I'd like to thank the contributors to this hint. I had Leopard and Boot Camp installed on a single drive in my MacBook. I replaced the drive with a 250GB HD and wanted to create 2 bootable OSX partitions and keep my Boot Camp partition. I did the following (using a combination of comments here):
1) Cloned my original OSX partition with SuperDuper.
2) Clone the Boot Camp partition with WinClone.
3) Formatted the new drive with Disk Utility (1 partition).
4) Restored OSX with SuperDuper.
5) Used the Boot Camp Assistant to only create the Windows partition then quit.
6) Restored my old Boot Camp partition with WinClone.
7) Used Disk Utility to resize the Leopard partition. Then created a new MacOS Extended (Journaled) partition with the new free space.
8) My Boot Camp partition failed to load with a blue screen and "UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME".
9) Installed MacFuse and NTFS_3G.
10) Opened the boot.ini file on the Boot Camp partition within OSX using TextWrangler. Changed the 3's to 4's. (Used Disk Utility to find out the new partition # assigned to Boot Camp after I created the new OSX partition).
11) Rebooted into Boot Camp and it worked!



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10.5: Create a third NTFS partition with Boot Camp
Authored by: chazsconi on Jun 13, '08 11:06:18AM
Thankyou PWB for these simplified instructions. However I wanted my extra partition to be NTFS, which with MacFuse and NTFS_3G will be accessible from Leopard and XP. To do this I did the following:
  1. Followed all of PWB's instructions to step 11.
  2. Checked XP still booted.
  3. Went back into OSX and used Disk Utility to format the new partition with NTFS instead of MacOS extended. (This option is available if you have got MacFuse/NTFS_3G installed)
  4. Step 3 will report an error due to a permissions problem
  5. Go to the terminal
  6. Change the ownership of the disk: sudo chown user_id:operator /dev/disk0s3 Replace user_id with your logged on user id.
  7. Re-do step 3 in Disk Utility which should now succeed. Change the ownership back to root: sudo chown user_id:operator /dev/disk0s3
  8. Done. You should now have 3 partitions: MacOS with Leopard; NTFS with XP installed and between the two an new empty NTFS partition
The only minor problem I have found with this is that within Leopard if I go to start-up disk within settings it cannot see the XP partition, so I can not reboot to XP from within Leopard. I have to reboot, hold down the Option key at startup and then select Windows from the menu manually.

Something else I have learnt from this exercise, which involved an lot of trial-and-error and rebooting, is that it's not a good idea to create or change any partitions from within Windows using the Disk Management snap-in in Computer Management. This either fails, results in partitions that OSX cannot see, or causes Windows to fail to boot once the partitions are created. It may be possible to do this successfully using the extended options available from the command line in Windows, but I didn't try this. In summary only use OSX to mess around with the partitions.

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10.5: Create a third NTFS partition with Boot Camp managed to get it to work on 10.4 too
Authored by: davejcb on Nov 25, '09 06:07:05AM

Using this a great big thanks to these guys.

Have edited with *******

10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: pbw on Sat, May 10 2008 at 7:55PM PDT
I'd like to thank the contributors to this hint. I had Leopard and Boot Camp installed on a single drive in my MacBook. I replaced the drive with a 250GB HD and wanted to create 2 bootable OSX partitions and keep my Boot Camp partition. I did the following (using a combination of comments here):
1) Cloned my original OSX partition with SuperDuper.
2) Clone the Boot Camp partition with WinClone.
3) Formatted the new drive with Disk Utility (1 partition).
4) Restored OSX with SuperDuper.
5) Used the Boot Camp Assistant to only create the Windows partition then quit.

***Didnt do this as i was starting from fresh***

6) Restored my old Boot Camp partition with WinClone.

*** Ignored 6***

7) Used Disk Utility ***from cd*** to resize the Leopard partition. Then created a new MacOS Extended (Journaled) partition with the new free space.
8) My Boot Camp partition failed to load with a blue screen and "UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME".

***(mine actually went into a constant restart loop)***

9) Installed MacFuse and NTFS_3G.

***(I didnt do this as i was happy for my 3rd partition to be fat32***

10) Opened the boot.ini file on the Boot Camp partition within OSX using TextWrangler. Changed the 3's to 4's. (Used Disk Utility to find out the new partition # assigned to Boot Camp after I created the new OSX partition).
11) Rebooted into Boot Camp and it worked!


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10.5: Create a third NTFS partition with Boot Camp
Authored by: chazsconi on Fri, Jun 13 2008 at 11:06AM PDT
Thankyou PWB for these simplified instructions. However I wanted my extra partition to be NTFS, which with MacFuse and NTFS_3G will be accessible from Leopard and XP. To do this I did the following:

1. Followed all of PWB's instructions to step 11.
2. Checked XP still booted.
3. Went back into OSX and used Disk Utility to format the new partition with NTFS instead of MacOS extended. (This option is available if you have got MacFuse/NTFS_3G installed)
4. Step 3 will report an error due to a permissions problem
5. Go to the terminal
6. Change the ownership of the disk: sudo chown user_id:operator /dev/disk0s3 Replace user_id with your logged on user id.
7. Re-do step 3 in Disk Utility which should now succeed. Change the ownership back to root: sudo chown user_id:operator /dev/disk0s3
8. Done. You should now have 3 partitions: MacOS with Leopard; NTFS with XP installed and between the two an new empty NTFS partition

The only minor problem I have found with this is that within Leopard if I go to start-up disk within settings it cannot see the XP partition, so I can not reboot to XP from within Leopard. I have to reboot, hold down the Option key at startup and then select Windows from the menu manually.

Something else I have learnt from this exercise, which involved an lot of trial-and-error and rebooting, is that it's not a good idea to create or change any partitions from within Windows using the Disk Management snap-in in Computer Management. This either fails, results in partitions that OSX cannot see, or causes Windows to fail to boot once the partitions are created. It may be possible to do this successfully using the extended options available from the command line in Windows, but I didn't try this. In summary only use OSX to mess around with the partitions.

*******************************************************
FOR 10.4 i found that the same procedure didnt work. I had to change the system clock to allow bootcamp to work as it was a beta (try 07.06.07)
Then used bootcamp as normal and setup windows (i had done this back in 2007 but used NTFS as windows and wanted to reduce the size)

Once windows was installed I used a 10.5 install disc 1 to access the disc utility. i was then able to do the same steps as before from steps 7 of PWB's post

I now have an XP (Fat 32) SERVICE (FAT 32) and Macintosh HD (Macintosh Journaled) Partitions on 10.4 and 10.5 OSX

This means i can now save a norton ghost image of windows to the service drive, when i want to reinstall windows i can boot from the ghost boot CD and recover the XP image from the service drive.



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: Macbie on Nov 13, '09 11:50:13AM

Hello all,

I am trying to follow these instructions, but I am running into a difficulty which has not been documented here yet.

Hardware is a Macbook Pro 15" 2.0GHz

I am trying to install OSX 10.5 Leopard as a main system, Windows XP for the unfortunate times when Windows is a must (You don't believe the amount of crappy software that teachers are forced to use sometimes...).
In addition to that I want to have two data partitions, the main one for Mac use, the little one to be used by both OS to simply share data. I have a 250GB drive, so my proposed partition looks like

OSX 10.5 50GB
Data (HFS) 140GB
Dual (FAT32) 30GB
WindowsXP 10GB

Now I understand that people write that Windows ought to be the third partition, which is ok with me. To begin with I tried to make it simple, with three partitions.
I followed all the steps above, but from step 7 onwards it does not play ball. Of course step 7 complains as described with "if you do that, bootcamp will fail" and I expected that. But... when I hold down the Alt-key on booting... it does not even show me the option for Windows. There is only the symbol for the Mac option there! So I don't even get to the bluescreen, it simply does not acknowledge any other installs.

I installed both rEFIt and bootpicker (not at the same time of course) and rEFIt did tell em that the partition table looked a bit wrong and fixed it. yet still no chance of seeing a Windows boot option.

Now according to the rEFIt website, I can just build the entire disk with an MBR partition table, which would make this all easier. But then I'd not be able to install OS X again off the disk.

Overall while I admire the ease of use of Disk Utilities, it is infuriating how it insists on re-allocating space in your partitioning all the time. I ahve not found how to make sure that the bootcamp partition does not end up at the bottom (i.e. 4th). Is there a better partitioning tool available which is known to work well with OSX? Given that it is based in Linux, it is a bit sad to see the partitioning so crippled...

Any hints for partitioning my disk to enable my scheme would be massively appreciated! Thank you!
MacNewbie



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: martini on Dec 06, '08 10:06:02PM

Need Help!!

I tried the steps and it was going fine. Booted up from the windows cd and did the inital setup (blue screen mode). After this is when i had the problem. When it restarted the macbook to go into the GUI installation stage to finish it off it just reboots into os x or if i hold c/option and pick the windows cd it just starts over and does the inital setup stage and not the 2nd stage with the GUI.

Anyone had this problem? Solutions? Im guessing maybe because os x partition is the 1st on the drive is whats causing problems. If the windows partition was the first one it would work? But that defeats my purpose of being able to install without formatting anything (ie. using bootcamp method as i already had 2 partitions)



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: RaveMsTr on Jan 13, '09 04:05:58AM

Followed some of the steps here and it works! On Vista at least.
How to:
- erase all other partitions other than Machintosh HD.
- run Boot Camp.
- create a partition for Windows
- follow Boot Camp instructions and install Vista
- after install is done(all of it, Boot Camp drivers and all in Vista) restart in Leopard and using disk utility resize your Leopard partition how you want(i curently have one more, Vista is third)
- restart in Vista
- Vista's boot loader will give you some messages about how it can't find the partition, that it's not formatted corectly... just let it be and it will boot.
Problems:
- in Leopard, Startup disk doesn't see the Vista partition so you will have to get into Vista via Restart+press Option Key.

Other than that it's running great. Will add a new Leopard partition to see if it still works!
This was done on 3.06(24") iMac, 500 Gb, Nvidia 8800GS running 10.5.6 and Vista Ultimate



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: scaine on Feb 17, '09 12:56:58PM

I followed these instructions to create 5 partitions on my MacBook: Leopard, Tiger, Windows XP, and 2 data partitions.

The key was to make the WinXP partition the THIRD partition (not the last, as most Boot Camp hints insist) because XP will only look in the first four partitions for its system code -- including the 200MB GTP 'protective' partition that GUID formatted disks put at the top of the drive.

It only took me three tries (the third after I learned of the XP limitation); I hope this helps others do better!



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: sci_spi on Apr 18, '09 10:19:55PM

I tried the procedure given but I did not get success. The only thing I changed as hinted in the last post is that I used the 'upper' or the 'middle' or the 'third' partition and not the 'last' one.
Now I am going to try the 11 steps exactly as stated. But please somebody provide me suitable procedure for the following:
I want to have 4 partitions in my only 320 GB hard disk. One for Mac OS X, 2nd for Mac_data, 3rd for WinXP (NTFS) and most important, the 4th for Win_data (NTFS). At the same time the WinXP/Windows should be shown in 'Startup Disk' in System Preferences. Also when I am running my iMac 20" (C2D, 2.66GHz, Mac OS X Leopard 10.5) in WinXP, the Boot Camp (installed from Mac OS DVD for drivers) in XP should also show Macintosh and Windows options for restart of the computer. Most importantly, I should be able to see my 'Win_data' partition in WinXP. In fact all the 4 partitions would be viewable from Mac OS and even readable. Of course for proper read/write something like NTFS-3G may be needed.
Kindly note that I cannot format the entire hard disk and start from install of Mac OS X. I also observe that 'iPartition', etc. may not be needed for the present requirement. I wish to create the 4 partitions with the existing Mac OS X intact and preferably without third party software.

Please somebody help. I have tried several times, installed XP and removed due to the problem coming with another NTFS data partition. (On erasing and creating the third partition for 'data', XP stops working with 'hal.dll not found' problem. If 3rd data partition is again deleted and reverted as 'free space', XP returns back. Finally in desperation, I created extended partition and logical drive of 'unallocated space' from XP's disk management. On restarting now, the computer neither boots in Mac nor in XP. Every time I have to press option button and go to Mac OS. Machine no more boots in XP now in any manner.) I am tired now. I am desperate for a proper solution.



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: sci_spi on Apr 21, '09 12:53:26AM

I also observed the following w.r.t. the problem stated earlier. I start in Mac OS X (using 'option' at start). I confirm in 'disk utility' that the data partition I made in Windows is still shown as 'free space'. So I just delete it again.
Now the Windows starts working without the error of 'hal.dll'.

There is another observation. When I used the 'gpt' command (gpt -b PARTITIONSTART -s SIZE, etc.) by booting from OS X DVD and used disk utility, there was a message saying something like 'Suspicious sector at MBR 0' (don't remember exactly). The partition of unused space seemed to have got done but this rather 'suspicious' message too was there.

Editing the boot.ini and changing 3's to 4's doesn't help. In my case '....(3)' works fine till I do not try to make an NTFS 'data' partition too.

Please help.



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: theosxman on Aug 22, '09 08:56:58AM

I have read all the above posts with their 3 partition set up for windows and mac. My question is this. . . . As a computer tech who has clients using both Vista/Windows 7 RC and XP and Mac OS X 10.5, it would be nice to be able to have a 3 partition set up to run Mac OS X, Windows 7 RC and Windows XP (pro or home), and as an added bonus, Mac OS X 10.4. And If I wanted to shoot for the moon, have a mac bootable partition for Snow Leopard when it comes out. So that's potentially 5 bootable partitions. I am not an under the hoot terminal guru, but more of a how to solve this or that type of problem in terms of using the os's themselves. Any help would be most helpful.

Here are my MBP's spec's......

MBP Intel 2.33 Core 2 Duo
2 GB RAM,
500GB Hard Drive
SuperDrive
the usual airport/bluetooth.

The size of the partitions I would prefer are as follows

Mac OS X 10.5.x 30GB
Mac OS X 10.4.x 30GB
Mac OS X 10.6.x 250GB
Windows 7 RC 100GB
Windows XP 50GB

I think that's all the important stuff. Thanks for any help anyone can provide.



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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: cstgermain on Sep 25, '09 04:06:30PM
I just managed a triple boot setup on a new MBP. I now have Snow Leopard 10.6.1, Leopard, 10.5.8, and Windows 7 RC and can boot easily to any of them with the option-key at power on. These are the steps I followed:
1) I installed the windows 7 RC via Boot Camp as per this recipe:
http://www.simplehelp.net/2009/01/15/using-boot-camp-to-install-windows-7-on-your-mac-the-complete-walkthrough/

2) Formated an external FW drive with 3 partitions: Clone, Backup, and Media.

3) Used Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) to clone a 10.5.8 installation I have on a mac-mini onto an external FW drive. (Even though I have a Leopard family pack install disk, you can't boot from it - at least I couldn't and anyway, most of what I wanted was on the mini anyway).

4) Used Time Machine to backup the 10.6.1 onto the FW drive Backup partition (I guess I could have used CCC but I was familiar with Time Machine and not with CCC until today).

5) Used WinClone to make an image of the BOOTCAMP partition on the external FW drive (just in case)


6) I booted the MBP from the Clone of 10.5.8 to make sure it would work and that there would be no driver issues (trackpad etc) - it worked just fine.

7) Now comes the scary part: (I have read a lot of posts about the challenges of doing a triple boot with a Boot Camp Windows partition already installed that result in XP or Vista not being bootable. Lots of folks have found workarounds to solve this I know). With the machine booted from the clone of 10.5.8 -RUNNING ON THE EXTERNAL FW DRIVE, I launched the disk utility and and resized the 10.6.1 partition to half what it was. (click on the 10.6.1 partition and then click on the + sign at the bottom left - this will allow you to keep the contents of 10.6.1 intact but free up some space). Call the new volume whatever you like and format it Mac OS Extended (Journaled).

8) Used CCC to copy the clone of 10.5.8 onto the new partition created in step 7.

9) Shut down and Power-up with the option key and all was well. All three OS's available. No modification of the Windows 7 bootmgr or any other boot parameters.

10) Boot to the 10.5.8 partition and change the computer network name to something else other than the name of the mini.

Worked for me and wasn't as difficult as some of the other approaches.

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10.5: Create a three-partition Boot Camp setup
Authored by: Zultner on Dec 23, '10 05:35:36PM

I wanted a three partition Boot Camp setup: one OS X partition, one NTFS data partition, and one Windows 7 partition. After trying some of the other comments, I found a very easy way to accomplish this:
1. Run Boot Camp assistant and install Windows 7 as per the installation and setup guide.
2. Purchase Coriolis System's iPartition software (about $36). Upon downloading it, you are directed to create a bootable CD. Boot with this CD, and use iPartition to resize the Macintosh HD and Bootcamp partitions to whatever size you want, and create a new partition for Data with whatever format you want (NTFS in my case).
3. Reboot and run Verify Disk Permissions and Verify Disk, just to make sure everything is OK.

Yes, iPartition costs money, but this is one of those times where EASY beats FREE...

The Bootcamp and Data partitions show up as disks and can be read by OS X. For read/write access, you can purchase and install Paragon Software's NTFS for Mac on the Macintosh HD, and HPS+ for Windows in Windows. Then all disks are fully accessible to both operating systems.

I also suggest immediately making sure Time Machine has a fresh backup, and getting WinClone to make an image of the Windows partition, as a further backup. If there is any problem, you can delete the Windows partition, recreate it, and restore it from WinClone. [In my experiments before finding this solution, Restoring Windows from WinClone was so much easier than doing a re-installation of Windows!]



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