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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine System 10.5
Time Machine backups are not bootable and require the Install DVD to serve as a restore. And you don't always have that disk handy. So just partition your Time Machine backup drive and copy the Install DVD to the first partition! This way, your data and the way to restore it stay together.

The easiest way to do so remains SuperDuper!. Be sure to give the DVD's name to the destination partition.

[robg adds: Disk Utility will also do this, as will CarbonCopyCloner 3.]
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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: cowinabox302 on Oct 26, '07 09:15:01AM

I'm not sure I follow. So you can restore a backup from time machine using super duper or disk utility or whatever?



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: DanFrakes on Oct 26, '07 09:51:26AM

Here's my interpretation of the hint ;-)

You can't restore a drive directly from Time Machine; you need a Leopard OS X Install disc. Instead of carrying around your backup drive and the Install disc, you can partition your backup drive into a backup section and a bootable section for the Install disc. The hint means that the easiest way to clone the Install disc to a partition on your backup drive is using SD (although CCC and Disk Utility work just as well for this purpose).

---
Dan Frakes / Senior Editor, Macworld / Senior Reviews Editor, Playlist



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: kbradnam on Oct 26, '07 10:08:17AM

Though if you have SuperDuper, then it makes more sense to me to use that to make a bootable copy of your hard drive. As a user of SuperDuper (for my home machines and the work network that I administer) I'm curious how I will integrate Time Machine into our backup strategy when we move to 10.5 server.

If I use Time Machine for our /Users folder that lives on the server, will individual users (logged into a different client machine) be able to use Time Machine to restore files themselves???



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: jiclark on Oct 26, '07 11:07:56AM

Sorry to veer off-topic, but the one thing I've never been able to figure out how to do with SuperDuper (and is exactly what TimeMachine does) is to save files that have been deleted from the source volume... Doesn't SuperDuper just maintain a backup that is a mirror of the source? In other words, doesn't it delete files from the backup that have been deleted from the source?

Back on topic, I can imagine Time Machine simply becoming another element in my backup strategy, as opposed to a replacement. I will definitely keep my external drive (cloned with SuperDuper, and updated daily with ChronoSync), so that I have an immediately bootable solution, and then use TM as a redundant backup of changed/deleted files...



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: kbradnam on Oct 26, '07 11:15:33AM

I use SuperDuper to make two sets of backups. One is a nightly backup which makes the backup an exact copy, so this will delete files from the backup if necessary.

I also backup to a second partition using the 'Copy Newer Files' option. This only ever adds to the backup, and can actually quickly take up a lot of space if there are lots of large temporary files that you only ever work with for a day or two. But this backup helps if you delete a file and don't realize for a day or two. This is an inelegant backup strategy to say the least, so I'm hopeful that Time Machine will make this part of my backup strategy redundant.



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: Anonymous on Oct 26, '07 10:38:07AM

How big should the partition be?



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: morespace54 on Oct 26, '07 01:02:48PM

I'd say, at least the size of the Leopard DVD(s)... ;)
(+/- 5GB per DVD)



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Dual layer = 8GB
Authored by: arru on Dec 13, '07 02:59:50AM

Actually Leopard ships on one dual-layer DVD, using > 7.6 GB so there you go



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: Hal Itosis on Oct 26, '07 11:26:29AM

This hint seems to imply partitioning is necessary, in order to
accomplish the task. While I am a *huge* fan of partitioning,
I thought I read somewhere that Time Machine backs-up into
folders. So --while partitioning might offer some advantages--
is it really a requirement? [ I ask on behalf of those newbies
and/or diehards, who deem partitioning highly undesirable.]

Also, the hint just says "copy the DVD". Does that make the
backup disk bootable? Did it mean to 'clone' perhaps? What?

-HI-



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: Hal Itosis on Oct 26, '07 11:31:34AM

Wow... editing would be nice. Especially since
-when we post- we CAN'T SEE the page we're
replying to. (SHEESH! What a system!).

Anyway, just ignore the last paragraph in my
previous post (since I can't edit it), and focus
on the FIRST paragraph. Okay? Thanks.

-HI-



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: osxpounder on Oct 26, '07 02:52:14PM

I seem to recall reading that Time Machine requires a drive of its own. I suppose that "drive" really means "volume". My point is that TM was said to be unable to backup to a folder -- it wanted the whole drive.



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: lodewijk on Oct 26, '07 11:57:46AM

3 partitions!!!

1 bootable copy of 10.5 install dvd (8gig?)
2 nightly superduper backup (as much as is needed)
3 time machine (rest of the disk-space)

use 1 to install 10.5 on machines, or restore time machine partition.
use 2 for superduper, but i guess 1 and 3 together make 2, so you don't even need superduper? and can use 2 partitions?



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: reidjazz on Oct 26, '07 01:18:13PM

Remember...redundancy, in terms of backups, is a GOOD thing. I'm keeping my SuperDuper! nightly backup bootable clone IN ADDITION to TimeMachine's mechanism.

---
"When you're finished learning, you're finished."



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: bugmenot on Dec 24, '07 06:44:34AM

I know that I'm late to the party here, but I would like to lend my experience :)

I like your strategy, since it would attack one problem that I had (where my drive became corrupted and superduper happily copied a new backup until it got to the corruption - overwriting my good backup in the process!). However, twice now I have experienced events that have killed both my regular AND backup drives. The first was lightning. Need I elaborate? :) The second was a bad case design, and the long and short of it was that one hard drive fell onto the one below it, killing both of them.

I now keep a local clone, but also subscribe to Mozy for $5/month. It has unlimited storage. It wouldn't be my first choice as a backup source, but I'm sold on offsite storage now!



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: 1amzave on Oct 26, '07 07:27:30PM

Though this is indeed a good point, hardware redundancy would be generally preferable to pure data redundancy, I'd think. Doing all these backups on separate partitions of the *same physical drive* strikes me as somewhat...unwise.



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: GfulDedFan on Oct 27, '07 09:50:25AM

With all this talk about using SuperDuper, which I love and have been a faithful user and backer-uperer..........has anyone bothered to pay attention to the fact that it isn't compatible with Leopard yet. They say it will be soon but until then, I'd say that TM is a safer backup.



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: jbarley on Oct 27, '07 03:04:11PM

Try as I will, when I clone my Leopard install disk to a partition on my backup disk, it will not boot.
Shows as bootable in prefs-startup disk, also shows when pressing Alt while restarting, but will not complete a boot.

jb.



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: dashard on Oct 29, '07 06:33:06AM

If you want to be able to 'clone' your Leopard install DVD to a bootable hard disk, you will need to do a couple of things.

- First, ensure that your target disk is in fact bootable. Check.
- Next, open up the Disk Utility and choose File>>New>>Disk Image from Folder. I have read that choosing (if available) New>>Disk Image from (Select a Device) actually does not copy everything, especially the niggling boot bits. (Feel free to correct me on this out there.)
- Once you have your Disk Image clone, Use Disk Utility to 'restore' it to your target drive. (Select your target drive in the left column list, choose the 'Restore' tab, set the Source to your newly created disk image, and the destination to your target disk.)

Voila! A DVD cloned to a hard drive that should be perfectly bootable if you followed above steps properly.



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upgrading TM drive?
Authored by: jspivack on Oct 29, '07 03:05:59AM

I am awaiting delivery of my Macbook with Leopard, and I an trying to plan a strategy for my external HDD use. Does anyone know if Time Machine allows you to gracefully "upgrade" your Time Machine drive? That is, if i start using TM today with an external 160GB HDD, and the in 6 months I want to upgrade to a 400GB HDD to have some more space, is there a way I can migrate the existing TM data and files to the new drive? For example, if I simply copy the TM folder to the new drive, will TM:
- recognize this and continue to use and increment it?
- ignore this, and start a new, non-incremental TM backup, leaving me browse access to the initial TM backup?
- ignore this, and start a new, non-incremental TM backup, leaving me no access to the initial TM backup?

Thanks
Jeff
[cross-posted from the MacWorld forums]



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upgrading TM drive?
Authored by: jspivack on Oct 29, '07 03:57:10AM
OK, I should have checked apple.com first:


"If you do run out of space, the best thing to do is to attach a new backup disk. After you attach the new disk, open Time Machine preferences and click Change Disk to choose it as your Time Machine backup disk."

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?path=Mac/10.5/en/15137.html

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upgrading TM drive?
Authored by: lssmit02 on Oct 31, '07 10:46:32AM

Except, the link you posted to Apple's site doesn't answer your question, which is whether you can copy your existing TM backup to the new drive, and then continue backing up to the copy as if nothing had changed. That would be great.



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upgrading TM drive?
Authored by: lssmit02 on Oct 31, '07 11:15:11AM
After doing a little digging, it looks like Shirt Pocket software may add this to SuperDuper!. See this discussion on their site: link

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One more thing…
Authored by: arru on Dec 13, '07 02:47:45AM

You will need to choose the proper partitioning scheme (GUID for Intel macs, APM for PowerPC ones) too. Unfortunately most external harddisks seem to have MBR (old PC legacy…) as pre-formatting. Click "options" in the partitioning pane in Disk Utility to select.



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10.5: Ease restore from Time Machine
Authored by: postglock on May 06, '08 12:57:34AM
If anyone is having problems starting up from their external hard drive, note that PPCs will not allow startup from USB drives, and certain FireWire drives may be unsupported by all Macs. Information from the SuperDuper! forums. I had problems where I could select my external drive as the startup volume in the system preferences, but restarting used my normal internal drive. Holding option at startup presented no extrenal drive either.

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